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Is dual enrollment in high school worth it?

I am very adamant on getting ahead. I am currently placed in all honors classes since freshman at my school and get placed in AP classes yet. But, if I get far enough ahead, should I consider dual enrolling? What benefits does it have?

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Ezra’s Answer

Hi there,

If you're seriously committed to advancing your academic career, I highly recommend considering dual enrollment. I personally benefited from a dual credit program during my high school years, and I'm truly grateful for the advantages it has provided me in the long run. I have friends who also seized the opportunity of such programs, and they're currently two years ahead of their peers from high school. It's a great way to get a head start!
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Alexis’s Answer

Based on my experience, I can confidently say that dual enrollment is a worthwhile venture, although this can vary from person to person. It provides an opportunity to experience the college atmosphere, which is a unique contrast to high school, but at a pace that's easier to manage. This way, you won't be overwhelmed in your freshman year, trying to adjust to the demands of college life and a new educational setting simultaneously. Furthermore, the universities that collaborated with my school offered these courses at a significantly reduced price, which was a great advantage for many.

As for AP courses, they undoubtedly hold their own merit! Successfully passing AP exams can exempt you from certain college courses, potentially saving you both time and money in the future. I understand that the cost of AP exams can be a bit steep, but there are waivers available to help offset this expense. If you're considering applying for a waiver, I encourage you to contact your high school counselor for details on how this process works in your school district.

Ultimately, both options could lead to time and cost savings in the long run. It all comes down to what you aim to achieve: do you want to skip certain classes entirely, or would you prefer a gradual transition into the college academic setting?
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Ava’s Answer

Hi Olivia,

I took AP classes in high school. If you're planning on going to college or a university, you absolutely should take AP/dual enrollment if you can!

For me, taking AP in high school gave me a lot of general education credits for free when I transferred to college. Depending on your school and major, that can easily make up half of your required credits! By the time I enrolled for my bachelor's, I only had to take a few gen ed and pre-requisites, the rest was all my major core classes. Despite being a double-major, I am still set to graduate about a full year early. In my case, I took a lot of extra AP math classes as electives because I wanted to go into tech. I also took the standard English, Spanish, science, and government/history courses. These were classes I did not have to take in college, so I could focus on the main part of my degree that I enrolled for! Look at colleges you're interested in and try to find a document listing potential AP transfer credits for your major. When you're in the graduation process, make sure you send your score report with your transcripts and confirm that your school received them.

From my experience, honors was not much different from AP. However, the course load may be faster paced and you will need to do well on your AP exams to actually earn the credit for college (most schools require a score of at least 3 or 4). Watch resources like YouTube or Khan Academy for review, always take notes, study previous years' AP exams if you need to. In senior year of high school I took 6 AP classes. I won't lie, it's very tough, but it is absolutely possible and worth it.

You sound like a dedicated student so I have faith in you! Good luck Olivia!
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much, Ava! Olivia
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Karissa’s Answer

It is a disadvantage because the AP test is cheaper than the community college class. Also, you meet more kids who are appropriate to be friend and romantic partners with in high school. Your parents may not want you to spend time with people in their early 20s.
Thank you comment icon Thank you! Olivia
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Caroline’s Answer

YES! I wish I had done this for AP classes I was less likely to get a 5 on (and therefore receive college credit). While I got an A in AP Calculus, I got a 2 on the AP exam and would have received both college credit and a good grade. Instead I was stuck taking a few pre-req math courses (which I dreaded when I wanted to fill my time with my political science and history classes). It also can help your resume for colleges showing that you're already succeeding in a higher education setting.
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