Skip to main content
5 answers
6
Updated 505 views

Does your career feel as rewarding as you thought when you went to school for the certifications required to work in this position? ?

Do you feel as though you can reach and help people on a personal level while completing the requested jobs?

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

6

5 answers


2
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Min’s Answer

It's ok to be unclear of what you want to do as a career. I would try to do research into a specific field whether it's finding information online, connecting with others, and/or utilizing your school's resources. I thought I wanted to be a doctor and started studying for it then realized I didn't want to be that so I pivoted to a business type of role. Be sure to keep an open mind and don't be afraid to make adjustments along the way if a role was not what you expected!
2
1
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Kari’s Answer

As I progress in my career and in my life, what I find rewarding changes. I have found that I am constantly reassessing my career to determine if it still fits my goals. Work is definitely not always rewarding, as every job has some parts that aren't going to match what you want to do. My advice is that you try something, and as you evolve you can evolve your skillset or learn from your job and grow into areas that feel rewarding.

For a specific field like psychiatry, there will be parts that you find rewarding (helping people) and parts that feel like work (the administrative stuff) but you also might find other activities like outside volunteering, family, etc. end up being what feels most rewarding.
Thank you comment icon Kari, thank you! William
1
1
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Madhumita’s Answer

During our school years, many of us are unsure about our exact career journey. It's important to choose classes that will help you land a job, but don't forget to also pay attention to what truly sparks your interest. Consider what you might love doing in the future, delve into subjects that captivate you the most, and identify those you really dislike...so you can steer clear of them.
1
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Eric’s Answer

William - yes, my job as
An internist and a pediatrician in medicine with a subspecialty in adolescent medicine definitely helps me feel like I reach people and make a difference. The important thing is figuring out what sparks your interest and your passion. I wanted to be a farmer when I grew up because I am an introvert. My parents pushed me and I joined a college program that was a lead in to medical school. I found that many patients didn’t understand the medical speak — especially teenager, that many MDs are afraid of. I worked for many years in gender affirming care and adolescent health and now I am providing adult and pediatric care in Guam where medicine is underserved. Find your interest and your passion and seek it out. Don’t be afraid to change your mind, especially if it feels like it’s not a good fit. I’m glad you’re thinking through your opportunities now.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

John’s Answer

Hi William!
Let me start by saying that it's important to remember that education and training are two different things. Getting a good education is an important, necessary part of life. Whether it's the basics like reading, writing, and general math (arithmetic, geometry, and algebra) or more advanced studies which teach more analytical thinking and theory - it's all good. Training develops skills and knowledge for performing a particular task or activity and can be taught prior to or while actually on a job that requires those abilities. Receiving on-the-job training and amassing actual experience at something can be equally as valuable as separate schooling away from the job. That said, people sometimes make the mistake of believing that a good education can replace experience or training, but nothing could be further from the truth.
As an employer, I've hired hundreds of people and done over a thousand interviews. On the job I've been a line worker, a supervisor, and a manager of large and small teams. The two year (Associate of Arts) and four-year (Bachelor of Arts) degrees I earned in college were not really related to the careers I've had in logistics, acquisition, operations, and management. The post-graduate degree I earned in Business Management was more directly related to my jobs over the years because I was able to apply the calculus, statistics, microeconomics, operations analysis, computer programming, research techniques, and report writing that I had learned getting that degree.
So now to answer your questions - the careers and life I've had turned out to be very rewarding, but not anything like I thought they'd be when I was going to school. In fact, the most rewarding career I've had is the one I'm doing now - which is not related to any school-based education I've ever done - I'm now a full time musician, music producer, and audio engineer. I'm mostly self-taught (I had eight years of formal piano, keyboard, orchestra, and vocal training during my early school years), but I do have more recent professional certifications in music mixing and mastering. I've produced five albums, two EPs, and a number of singles which all have brought me tremendous joy. And had I not done those other careers and earned retirement income for them - I would not be free to do music now because it doesn't pay as much as I'd like.
As to your second question, I've always felt like I could reach and help people in almost all the jobs I've had. And the few where I couldn't - I quit.
I think it's very impressive that you're thinking about being able to reach and help others in your future work. It's absolutely brilliant that you're beginning to focus on that as a criteria for your activities, education, training and jobs - because as someone at the other end of things from where you're starting out - I can tell you that it's the most personally satisfying aspect of life.
Good luck on your journey - you're going to do great!
Thank you comment icon your response made tears start to swell up. thank you the advice from someone who has lived as much life as you in priceless. William
0