2 answers

What are some key study tips or advice you would forward to first year pharmacy students?

Updated Tallahassee, Florida

The first year of pharmacy school can be a very exciting, yet scary experience. There is limited time to adjust and it can be difficult to immediately find mentors that are overflowing with tips and help. Overall, what is some general for advice for first year pharmacy students?

#pharmacy #pharmacy-student #pharmacy-school

2 answers

Sheila’s Answer

Updated Washington, WA

Pharmacy school is exciting and demanding. My study tips are based on your learning style. I am a visual learner (color coding and charts). Several times a week, I would review that week’s classes and color code my notes in categories. I also created charts /grids to review. Each week I would review previous week’s material then start the new material. This was time consuming upfront but saved me study time near tests/exams. Due to the rigorous course load, it would have been too much to wait until a week or so before tests/exams to learn the material.

Some of my classmates just read the material every week, often recording what they read to listen to during down time (driving, waiting in line shopping, at restaurants- fast food of course- while waiting on order).

Study groups or studying with just one person also helps in courses that are more challenging.

Hope this helps. Best of luck.


Updated
Great tips as every student has their own style. I would definitely recommend that you find a group that studies similar to you and create a strong study group. Pharmacy school is very fast paced and you will learn a great deal. Working with others will not only help you talk through what you learn, but prepare you for group projects during and after school.

Mary’s Answer

Updated

Congrats on getting into pharmacy school! It is a hard journey but totally worth it. As the previous commenter said, I would definitely encourage you to organize and condense your notes. I would rewrite/reorganize my lecture notes and have a set of condensed notes for each exam per class. After the exam, I would go back and highlight what was asked/emphasized. For the final I only needed to look at my condensed notes instead of looking through each and every lecture.


One major thing I wish I knew as a P1 was to start a CV/resume. You do so much in pharmacy school and don't document it. When you're a P3-P4 applying for programs then you don't have to scramble and make a CV/resume.

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