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What are the best strategies for finding and securing residency programs for after pharmacy school?

For pharmacy students interested in pursuing a residency program after pharmacy school, it can sometimes be challenging. What are some effective strategies in going about the residency search? #pharmacy #pharmacy-student #pharmacy-residency


Applying in different hospitals Ereny sawirs

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Elizabeth’s Answer

American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) will have the most resources for starting a residency search. I would highly recommend going to your local or state society of health-system pharmacists for local residency showcases. The largest and most comprehensive of these showcases will be at the ASHP mid-year conference that is in December of each year in varying locations. There you are able to speak with representatives of each program and get more information.


As far as timing, the best time to go to these showcases is during your 2nd - 3rd year of pharmacy school. 4th year is too late since most students are already completing applications around mid-year and most programs have deadlines in late December/early January.


Another important thing is to contact programs that you are particularly interested in and set up casual visits (pre-interviews if you will). This helps you stand out from other applicants and also familiarizes leadership with your name and face. Use contacts when you can - professors, family friends, etc. because in a competitive environment, getting your name out there and having someone vouch for you is very helpful.


For Texas specifically, most Colleges of Pharmacy have their own local residency showcases that are less overwhelming that the one at ASHP mid-year. In addition, local chapters of ASHP usually have mentoring programs that you can sign up for and have a mentor in the field you are interested. Often this mentor can be quite helpful in advancing your residency search.


Good luck!

Elizabeth recommends the following next steps:

Research residency programs on ASHP website
Attend ASHP mid-year residency showcase and other local residency showcases as able.

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Sonya’s Answer

American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) will have the most resources for starting a residency search. I would highly recommend going to your local or state society of health-system pharmacists for local residency showcases. The largest and most comprehensive of these showcases will be at the ASHP mid-year conference that is in December of each year in varying locations. There you are able to speak with representatives of each and get more information.


As far as timing, the best time to go to these showcases is during your 2nd - 3rd year of pharmacy school. 4th year is too late since most students are already completing applications around mid-year and most programs have deadlines in late December/early January.


Another important thing is to contact programs that you are particularly interested in and set up casual visits (pre-interviews if you will). This helps you stand out from other applicants and also familiarizes leadership with your name and face. Use contacts when you can - professors, family friends, etc. because in a competitive environment, getting your name out there and having someone vouch for you is very helpful.

https://www.tldrpharmacy.com/content/how-to-stand-out-as-a-residency-applicant-an-insiders-guide

Sonya recommends the following next steps:

Basic things to keep in mind as you are putting together the application packet: CV- Your CV needs to find the happy medium between "sparse" and "inundated with excessive details on everything you've ever done." Don't pump it up with fluff, but put anything of real substance in there. Given the number applications submitted to a program, no one is going to read details in your CV about how many patients you worked up during your 'xyz' rotation. Have clear headings. Most places will look for things like education, work experience, rotation experience (list these in REVERSE chronological order), project experience, community service, etc. Work experience, especially in the venue that you are looking for a residency in (i.e. hospital pharmacy experience for a hospital based program) is always a plus and should be highlighted. Make it neat and readable (i.e. don't use a brush scripts font that no one can read). Cover letter- Be sincere, this is your chance to talk about YOU. Don't just re-list what's on your CV. You can have a generic "home base" cover letter template to work from, but make sure to include program specific changes for each program you are applying to. What specifically about that program interests you? Letters of Rec- Be sure they're from faculty and/or preceptors that know you well enough and will write you a good, honest, and sincere letter. The best letters of recommendation specifically talk about your qualities as a residency applicant. Most RPDs are not impressed if you get a letter from a 'big name' that happens to be your dean (i.e. Joe DiPiro) who doesn't really know you and writes a very generic letter. On-Site Interviews: As cliche as it sounds, be yourself. Be real and don't come off as robotic. Don't make it seem like you're asking a list of questions on a checklist. Demonstrate genuine interest in the program you are interviewing with. And show genuine interest in completing post grad residency training. If it appears that you are just going through the motions and it seems like you are applying for residency because its the "next step" in the process or means to an end, that will be evident right away. Remember the number of applicants each program gets every year. Even if you are completing residency training as a means to an end (i.e. pre-req for some fancy fellowship you want to eventually complete), don't make that obvious on the interview day or during the application/interview process. While I mentioned not being robotic, don't be too casual either (i.e. don't fist pump the RPD when you meet them). Attention to detail such as being on time, following any instructions you were given, dressing/grooming appropriately are all important aspects to the interview." https://www.tldrpharmacy.com/content/how-to-stand-out-as-a-residency-applicant-an-insiders-guide

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Debra’s Answer

Hello! All of the above answers are great and provide great advice when looking for residencies. I'm currently a PGY1 Managed Care Resident and I believe the right residency finds you. With a lot of hardwork and dedication, you can make yourself a well-rounded applicant that will stand out on residency applications. While in pharmacy school, I worked multiple different jobs, participated in research, joined organizations through which I held several leadership positions and was a decent student (3.4 range). The best advice I can provide when going about sifting through programs is to make a list of your own requirements. What's the most staffing you would want to do? Do you want to have co-residents? Are you limited geographically? You may start to see the number of programs meeting this criteria may shrink quickly. From there, you can start to narrow down your top choices through talking to the current program directors or residents. It's a grueling process but it goes by very quickly and will go smoothly if you can stay organized.

Debra recommends the following next steps:

Visit the ACCP residency directory
Determine what you want out of a residency

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Maru M.’s Answer

participating in volunteer programs

Maru M. recommends the following next steps:

Participating in volunteer programs

Volunteer programs are great for employees where they can show their skills , and employers as well to get to know them Ereny sawirs

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Dmitriy’s Answer

I would look to ASHP for residency opportunities. Depending on your state of practice, opportunities may vary. For example in NY a residency is less common then other parts of the country, so you may be able to find a clinical position without a residency. Also consider board certifications can often offer similar positions as a residency can open.


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Devangkumar’s Answer

Contact ASHP ( https://accred.ashp.org/aps/pages/directory/residencyprogramsearch.aspx ) and ACCP ( https://www.accp.com/resandfel/ )

There are some non-accredited residency program with Academy of Managed Care Pharmacy ( http://amcp.org/Tertiary.aspx?id=9076 )

ASHP has resident matching program that could be most helpful.

check this webpage: https://natmatch.com/ashprmp/applicants/applications.html


I hope that this would be helpful.


All great answers above! There is also a book called "Get the Residency - ASHP’s Guide to Residency Interviews and Preparation" that I would recommend. It has all of the above advice in an easy to read and follow format. Mary Young

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Hatem’s Answer

Strengthen clinical skills, sharpen communication skills with other healthcare professionals such nurses,physicians...etc

constantly adapting to the new technological methods that help provide great healthcare service to patients.

staying up to date to all changes for laws or guidelines provided by state board or guidelines from various providers such as CDC, AHA...etc.


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Krystal’s Answer

The ASHP website is the best resource to find residency programs for after pharmacy school. Utilizing PhORCAS system through the ASHP website is the best tool used to apply to residency programs.


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Kristine’s Answer

The best thing that you can do is shadow a pharmacist in an area you think you would like to practice in the future. Then an absolute MUST is to attend ASHP midyear conference. Have one or two stellar questions that will make the person at that location remember you. It should show you have researched their program intensely. For instance, "One thing I would like to get out of my residency is the opportunity to have rotations with various specialties. If you know they have specialty rotations then ask how that pharmacist chose their's. Also what may them stay at the current health system or if they are leaving what drew them away?" Have business cards with up-to-date phone and email address to hand out.

Kristine recommends the following next steps:

Shadow or research your specialty
Attend midyear
Get your letters of recommendation and references together

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Michael’s Answer

While in school, you can do some internships at facilities or institutions and this will aid you get the right place for you so you can fit in easily.

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