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How do I narrow my college search?

I've been trying in vain to narrow down my list of colleges, it feels like deadlines are around the corner and I have no idea what I would do in the best case scenario that I got accepted into all the universities I am applying to #college #search #help #choices #narrow

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Subject: Career question for you

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Anwar’s Answer

Deciding which college to choose can be a difficult choice, and trust me its a life changing moment. 


While some follow family traditions or friends advise to choose, others make decision basis field of study, majors offered, location, popularity, or those not requiring standardized tests, etc.


List of schools and colleges that matches your needs perfectly, but you'll also see the ones that come close.


To help you find colleges and universities you are looking for, you can find a list of the Featured Schools you will find here at below links


Perform your college search by clicking on a state/province.  

Anwar recommends the following next steps:

Additional Links: http://www.collegeview.com/collegesearch/index.jsp
or https://www.usnews.com/best-colleges/college-search
https://www.petersons.com/college-search.aspx
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Simeon’s Answer

Unless you are going into law or medicine, I would focus on affordability. Make sure to not discount community college, especially for a lot of the intro level courses. If you have a pick of places, I would make a point of visiting their campuses to see if it feels like a good fit. Plus, you often get the chance to see flyers and ads for groups, activities, and events that you don't get to see from just visiting the college's website.
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Charlie’s Answer

Hello!

Like other have said, this can be a difficult choice, but also a very exciting one. I would recommend taking some time to visit each campus. Take a tour—both with a tour guide and on your own. Think about how you feel. Doesn’t it feel like a good fit? Does it feel like home? Visit with the academic programs you’re interested in—talk to the faculty, staff and students. Do you connect with them? Visit some campus events and residence halls—does it seem like the place for you? Think about how you’ll get involved on campus. Campus involvement will enhance your academic and overall experience. Make the choice that is right for you—sometimes that isn’t where your friends are going. Whatever school you choose I hope you have a great time.

Charlie recommends the following next steps:

Plan a visit
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Ken’s Answer

It really does not matter what college you attend. The important things for you to do in preparation are

  • Get to know yourself as best as you can to determine an appropriate career path for you
  • Do the best work that you can do to get the best grades possible, so you will be attractive to employers
  • Do inter personal face to face networking to get to know people in your career area and learn what the inside view of the career area is to make sure that is comfortable and suitable for you

To make the transition to college much easier and get a great education at a reasonable rate, look at your local Community College. Many professionals, including me, got a great start at our local Community College. It is a much overlooked jewel and a great way to get a great start on your education/career journey.


Here is an interesting video regarding the choice of a college presented by someone who worked at Sanford University.

## http://www.ted.com/talks/julie_lythcott_haims_how_to_raise_successful_kids_without_over_parenting

Ken recommends the following next steps:

The first step is to take an interest and aptitude test and have it interpreted by your school counselor to see if you share the personality traits necessary to enter the field. You might want to do this again upon entry into college, as the interpretation might differ slightly due to the course offering of the school. However, do not wait until entering college, as the information from the test will help to determine the courses that you take in high school. Too many students, due to poor planning, end up paying for courses in college which they could have taken for free in high school.
Locate and attend meetings of professional associations to which people who are doing what you think that you want to do belong, so that you can get their advice. These associations may offer or know of intern, coop, shadowing, and scholarship opportunities. These associations are the means whereby the professionals keep abreast of their career area following college and advance in their career. You can locate them by asking your school academic advisor, favorite teachers, and the reference librarian at your local library. Here are some tips: ## https://www.careeronestop.org/BusinessCenter/Toolkit/find-professional-associations.aspx?&frd=true ## ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/9-tips-for-navigating-your-first-networking-event ##
It is very important to express your appreciation to those who help you along the way to be able to continue to receive helpful information and to create important networking contacts along the way. Here are some good tips: ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/the-informational-interview-thank-you-note-smart-people-know-to-send?ref=recently-published-2 ## ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/3-tips-for-writing-a-thank-you-note-thatll-make-you-look-like-the-best-candidate-alive?bsft_eid=7e230cba-a92f-4ec7-8ca3-2f50c8fc9c3c&bsft_pid=d08b95c2-bc8f-4eae-8618-d0826841a284&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=daily_20171020&utm_source=blueshift&utm_content=daily_20171020&bsft_clkid=edfe52ae-9e40-4d90-8e6a-e0bb76116570&bsft_uid=54658fa1-0090-41fd-b88c-20a86c513a6c&bsft_mid=214115cb-cca2-4aec-aa86-92a31d371185&bsft_pp=2 ##
Next, when you have the results of the testing, talk to the person at your high school and college who tracks and works with graduates to arrange to talk to, visit, and possibly shadow people doing what you think that you might want to do, so that you can get know what they are doing and how they got there. Also, talk to the Director of Alumni Relations at your local Community College and other colleges that you consider to arrange to talk to graduates who might be working in your career area of interest, so you can get the inside scoop. Here are some tips: ## http://www.wikihow.com/Network ## ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/nonawkward-ways-to-start-and-end-networking-conversations ## ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/4-questions-to-ask-your-network-besides-can-you-get-me-a-job?ref=carousel-slide-1 ##
Getting to know yourself and how your personality traits relate to people involved in various career opportunities is very important in your decision making process. During my many years in Human Resources and College Recruiting, I ran across too many students who had skipped this very important step and ended up in a job situation which for which they were not well suited. Selecting a career area is like buying a pair of shoes. First you have to be properly fitted for the correct size, and then you need to try on and walk in the various shoe options to determine which is fits the best and is most comfortable for you to wear. Following are some important steps which I developed during my career which have been helpful to many .
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Lynette’s Answer

As Anwar already mentioned, choosing a college can be daunting, and you'll have a much better experience if you get it right on the first try. Rest assured, most people come to love their alma mater, regardless of which one they end up attending! A lot depends on your unique situation and values. But, here's how I'd prioritize:

  1. Program of study: which schools have the best reputation for the program of study you plan to follow? If you're investing a lot of money and time in an education, you want to get the best bang for your buck. This can also pay off in the job search, later. Having a degree from a well-known college on your resume can help yours rise to the top of the pile.
  2. Cost: which ones are affordable, based on your financial situation? Don't get in over your head - make sure you're investing in an education that will pay off.
  3. Emotional fit: which schools feel good to you? choose a school that fits with your unique values, interests, and preferences. Some people prefer a smaller, more close-knit community, while others feel more comfortable in a large, diverse one. Some people love sports, outdoor recreation, and social life. Choose a school that offers the activities you love to do. The best way to get a feel for college life, is to visit in person. Walk around campus, and identify the colleges that feel like the best fit for you.
  4. Location: in-state schools are typically more affordable, and you'll save on transportation costs to/from home.
  5. Have a "plan B": make sure you have at least one application in to a college you're reasonably sure you will be accepted to. That way, if you don't get into your 1st/2nd/3rd choice schools, you'll have a backup.

Hope that helps. Good luck!

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