2 answers

How do I know when it is time to transfer schools

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2 answers

Roger’s Answer

Updated
Your gut will tell you. I went to three different colleges before I graduated. I started at a California State University, transferred to a California Community College, and finished up at the University of Southern California. I was not happy at all in the Cal State system. My gut told me so right away. I lasted one year at Cal State Northridge. Then, I went to Glendale Community College for a year to figure out next steps -- on where I REALLY wanted to go to school which was USC. I graduated in 3 1/2 years with a degree from USC. You will know when it is time to transfer schools. Your head, heart, and gut will let you know if it is time to transfer. (And, by transferring, you are not a quitter. You are just looking for a better opportunity.)

Jennifer’s Answer

Updated

If the school that you are at is not meeting your needs then you should definitely look into other schools. But, not every school is the same so you should do some research before jumping from one situation that's not working right into another. There are a lot of factors to consider, including campus size, programs offered, cost, student life, and student support.

I recommend that you take the time to really identify your plan - what is your major and what are you hoping to accomplish. Also, take time to figure out your budget and how much college you can afford without going into excessive debt.

Once you identify a couple of schools then you should try to tour the campus and get a feel for what it's like there, before you commit.

And, if you need more time to consider your major or future goals then a community college is a really good option for getting the basics and required classes out of the way. They can also help you find your passion with out costing you a lot of money!

Jennifer recommends the following next steps:

  • Identify your goals, needs, and future plans and be clear about what you need in order to succeed. If your goals aren't clear then taking required classes at a community college may be a good option for now.
  • Consider your finances and what you can afford. Are there local schools that will get you to your end goal just as effectively as larger, big-name (expensive) schools?
  • Shop around the schools before committing. Take a campus tour, talk to students, read their ratings, etc.
  • Last of all - remember that college is not always a straight line. Do what is best for you and try to avoid pressure to do what everyone else is doing. Good Luck!