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What buisness bachelors degree would be the most beneficial for an MBA?


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I’s Answer

Hi there! Looking at the class breakdowns at top schools, no bachelors degree is ineligible for admission. What schools do care about is your GPA and quantitative ability. Do a major that will net you a higher GPA if you are deciding based solely on business school, otherwise do whatever major interests you. If you are going to school in the US, whatever major you choose, make sure to take and excel in a few quantitative classes as business schools want to see those and honestly, having that quant aptitude will help in business school. More than a major, business schools will want to see great work experience with increasing responsibility (promotions etc.) so keep in mind how to maximize your internships and post-college job opportunities as well.

I recommends the following next steps:

Look at the numerous MBA forums on the net
Research business schools

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Michael’s Answer

What you study in undergrad should help prepare you for your first job. After a few years of work you may very well learn that you don't need an MBA to continue on the path you want to go. Many business school students are pursuing a general business education to help switch careers, while others are continuing on a track like investment banking.

I completed my MBA almost a decade ago, and had done a double major in computer science and general business for undergrad. Most MBA students did not study business as an undergrad. One of the greatest values of going to business school is learning from your classmates, and having diverse backgrounds adds to this.

If you are confident in the need for an MBA in the future, a well rounded undergrad business degree may reduce some of the foundational classes you take in graduate school, and allow you to pursue more advanced studies. Some business schools require foundational classes like Accounting for all students, but even so your familiarity with the subjects can allow you to focus efforts on classes that are completely new. From my experience business school classes are much more in depth than undergraduate, so you may still want to take the same classes as you took in undergrad. One of the biggest differences is the case driven nature of MBA classes, and input from your classmates based on their real-world work experience.

My advice is to not over-prepare for attending business school, and instead focus on preparing yourself to succeed at your first job. If that is a business role, take classes that will help you get a head start there. You will learn a lot more on the job than in class. If you aren't interested in a business role immediately, then feel free to pursue another major, whether that is art history or computer science - as long as it helps you succeed in your first job. Business schools want to help students accelerate their careers, and so are looking for candidates that are already succeeding in their previous roles.


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Walt’s Answer

I majored in business management in undergrad and later pursued an MBA... If I could go back and do it differently, I would have chosen a different undergrad major. However, studying business in college did give me the skills that I needed to work for a bank for a few years before my MBA and that experience made me realize that I didn't want to work in investment banking. That realization gave me better focus during business school, which was beneficial.

So what? Ultimately, the reasons to major in business administration (or business management, economics, etc.) in college are: (1) you hope to launch a business after college and want to develop the fundamental skills to be an entrepreneur, (2) you're genuinely interested in the subjects and know you'll excel more academically in them than other fields, or (3) you go to a good - but not Ivy/top liberal arts - school and want to pursue a career in a field like investment banking, consulting, or something similar that will either require a business degree or an elite pedigree. On a related note - those types of careers can be a great foundation for your career, but are not for everybody, so do some separate research on the careers before making a college or major decision based upon them.

Good luck! Business is a fascinating career path and the fact that you're thinking a few steps ahead now suggests that you're someone who would be successful in it.

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Michelle’s Answer

Hi Taylor,

There are no limitations on what Bachelor's degree you should seek for your undergrad. I would recommend deciding what type of industry interest you. What are you passionate about? I obtained BS in Human Sciences with a concentration in Nutrition and worked in the medical field for 10 years. Later in life, I changed my career to Finance and went back for my MBA to gain and strengthen my skills in Finance, Accounting, Marketing, Leadership, Corporate resiliency, Networking, and Analytics. It was a great addition and added some diversity.
It was rewarding and I had a better appreciation for it.
All the Best!

Michelle recommends the following next steps:

Meet with a school counselor to discuss your career goals and interest
Research Business Schools (some offer BS/MBA combo degrees)
Look into internships or professionals in your industry of interest to gain insight and experience

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Jacqueline’s Answer

Hi Taylor,


I would say that any business bachelors degree would be helpful because you have to take quantitative classes like finance, accounting, economics in your undergrad as core requirements and these quant core requirements will come in handy once you apply and enter your MBA. For example I just finished my MBA degree and my business bachelors degree had a Marketing focus. My program was very quant heavy and it helped to have taken courses in finance, accounting and economics during my undergrad because the concepts we were covering were familiar but at an MBA level this time.


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Veena’s Answer

To add to what has been included by others:

There isn't any specific bachelors degree that is most beneficial for applying for an MBA. MBAs come from all academic and professional backgrounds. For example, I went to business school with people who had studied economics, biology, engineering, computer science, international relations, architecture, urban planning, etc. -- the list goes on and on.

However, it's important to:

1) Do your homework to understand if an MBA is the right path for you. I would recommend getting at least a few years of work experience to see if graduate school is something that you would be interested in and if graduate school could benefit your career path. Speak to individuals who are farther along their career journeys (those with and without MBAs) to better understand the value proposition of this. Were they able to progress to higher levels in their career with or without an MBA? Were they able to transition to a new career with or without an MBA?

2) If you determine that an MBA might be the right next step, follow the suggestions above to find out about the various types of MBA programs that are available.

3) Make sure that you have a clear view of how an MBA will help you in your career. This will be important to articulate in the application and interview process.


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Tatyana’s Answer

Hi Taylor,

To share my story with you, I decided to do my undergraduate degree in Business (BBA), followed by an MBA. If I had a chance to do it all over again, I would probably do my undergraduate degree in Science or Engineering first. Reason being is that I feel that it would be great to develop a foundation of technical skills, and then build business skills on top of that foundation.

That being said, if you do not have any interest in science, then please do not pick science. Pick a subject that you are really interested in to help you really excel in your studies. Good luck!

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Steve’s Answer

An MBA can be a great addition to your undergrad degree, so it rarely makes sense to major in business or econ as your Bachelors unless you truly expect to focus solely on those areas. Instead, pick a major that you are really interested in, and then add the MBA on top of that to enhance your skills, broaden your scope, and position yourself for career advancement.


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Kannan’s Answer

I personally don’t think any bachelor’s degree should be a hindrance to pursue MBA. I think MBA is more about what we learn from everyone in our class. So, if we have a vast experience among our batch mates that would be a blessing. But with regard to the skill set I would say its better to have an understanding of finance, economy and accounting.

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Hanna’s Answer

Hi Taylor,

I would choose something that interests you for your undergrad degree. I have a Fashion Merchandising degree and a minor in Business Administration. I then went on after to receive my MBA and am no longer working in the fashion industry. The MBA will just complete your understanding of all the ins and outs of running a business (any type of business). It allowed me to view things in a larger picture. I do believe that my minor classes in Business helped set me up for a basic understanding of the future MBA classes.

Hope this helps!
Hanna

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Ken’s Answer

It all depends upon you and how your personality traits relate. . The first step is to get to know yourself to see if you share the personality traits which make one successful in that area. The next step is doing networking to meet and talk to and possibly shadow people doing what you might think that you want to do to see if this is something that you really want to do, as a career area could look much different on the inside than it looks from the outside.  When I was doing college recruiting, I encountered too many students, who skipped these important steps, and ended up in a career/job for which they were ill suited.

Ken recommends the following next steps:

The first step is to take an interest and aptitude test and have it interpreted by your school counselor to see if you share the personality traits necessary to enter the field. You might want to do this again upon entry into college, as the interpretation might differ slightly due to the course offering of the school. However, do not wait until entering college, as the information from the test will help to determine the courses that you take in high school. Too many students, due to poor planning, end up paying for courses in college which they could have taken for free in high school.
Next, when you have the results of the testing, talk to the person at your high school and college who tracks and works with graduates to arrange to talk to, visit, and possibly shadow people doing what you think that you might want to do, so that you can get know what they are doing and how they got there. Here are some tips: ## http://www.wikihow.com/Network ## ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/nonawkward-ways-to-start-and-end-networking-conversations ## ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/4-questions-to-ask-your-network-besides-can-you-get-me-a-job?ref=carousel-slide-1 ##
Locate and attend meetings of professional associations to which people who are doing what you think that you want to do belong, so that you can get their advice. These associations may offer or know of intern, coop, shadowing, and scholarship opportunities. These associations are the means whereby the professionals keep abreast of their career area following college and advance in their career. You can locate them by asking your school academic advisor, favorite teachers, and the reference librarian at your local library. Here are some tips: ## https://www.careeronestop.org/BusinessCenter/Toolkit/find-professional-associations.aspx?&frd=true ## ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/9-tips-for-navigating-your-first-networking-event ##
It is very important to express your appreciation to those who help you along the way to be able to continue to receive helpful information and to create important networking contacts along the way. Here are some good tips: ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/the-informational-interview-thank-you-note-smart-people-know-to-send?ref=recently-published-2 ## ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/3-tips-for-writing-a-thank-you-note-thatll-make-you-look-like-the-best-candidate-alive?bsft_eid=7e230cba-a92f-4ec7-8ca3-2f50c8fc9c3c&bsft_pid=d08b95c2-bc8f-4eae-8618-d0826841a284&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=daily_20171020&utm_source=blueshift&utm_content=daily_20171020&bsft_clkid=edfe52ae-9e40-4d90-8e6a-e0bb76116570&bsft_uid=54658fa1-0090-41fd-b88c-20a86c513a6c&bsft_mid=214115cb-cca2-4aec-aa86-92a31d371185&bsft_pp=2 ##

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Hanna’s Answer

Hi Taylor,

I would choose something that interests you for your undergrad degree. I have a Fashion Merchandising degree and a minor in Business Administration. I then went on after to receive my MBA and am no longer working in the fashion industry. The MBA will just complete your understanding of all the ins and outs of running a business (any type of business). It allowed me to view things in a larger picture. I do believe that my minor classes in Business helped set me up for a basic understanding of the future MBA classes.

Hope this helps!
Hanna

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