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What are different job options for Marine biologists or oceanographer?

I am a Junior in high school who is interested in the ocean and the live in it. I just would like to know what job options are available besides being a scientist in a lab #marine-biology #oceanography # #career #job

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Bryce’s Answer

Hi Sheila,

There are many job opportunities in both marine biology and oceanography, but they are very different. Oceanography focuses on the non-living aspects of the ocean. Jobs include mapping the ocean floor, tracking currents and weather patterns, tracking the affects of global warming, and many more. Marine biology focuses on the living aspects of the ocean. Jobs in this field include organismal research opportunities, species conservation, animal training, zoology, species identification, and many more. It all comes down to whether you would like to throughly work with the living organisms or not.

Bryce recommends the following next steps:

Further research on careers in the field
Reach out to more professionals/shadow professionals
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Marina Midori’s Answer

Oceanography is very different from marine biology, because one works only with animals and their environment. Since oceanography works directly with the fluid such as rivers, oceans, water tables, lakes, lagoons and ponds, it studies climate, sediment, animals and tries to avoid catastrophes, making and contributing to the prediction of tsunamis, floods , tsunamis and climate change. But there are also those who work with oil exploration conducting research to search for oil in the ocean and in the rivers.

Marina Midori recommends the following next steps:

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James Constantine’s Answer

Hello Sheila,

Learning about Marine Biology and Oceanography in Community College

If you are interested in learning more about marine biology and oceanography, starting at a community college can be a great way to begin your educational journey. Community colleges often offer introductory courses in marine biology and oceanography that can provide you with a solid foundation of knowledge in these fields. Additionally, community colleges are typically more affordable than four-year universities, making them an accessible option for many students.

Choosing the Right Courses

When selecting courses at a community college, look for classes that focus on marine biology, oceanography, ecology, and environmental science. These courses will introduce you to the fundamental concepts and principles of marine life, ocean systems, and the interactions between organisms and their environments. It’s important to choose classes that cover a broad range of topics within marine biology and oceanography to gain a comprehensive understanding of these fields.

Hands-On Experience

Many community colleges also offer hands-on learning opportunities such as field trips, research projects, and internships. Taking advantage of these experiences can provide you with practical skills and real-world exposure to marine environments. Look for programs that offer fieldwork or lab-based activities to supplement your classroom learning.

Transferring to a Four-Year University

After completing your coursework at a community college, you can transfer to a four-year university to further your studies in marine biology and oceanography. When choosing a university, look for programs that have strong reputations in these fields and offer specialized courses or research opportunities that align with your interests.

Making It Your Living

To make a living in the field of marine biology and oceanography, consider pursuing a bachelor’s degree in marine biology, marine science, or a related discipline at the university level. Many careers in this field require at least a bachelor’s degree, and some positions may require advanced degrees such as a master’s or Ph.D.

Making a Difference

With the knowledge you gain from your education, you can make a difference by contributing to conservation efforts, conducting research on marine ecosystems, or working in environmental advocacy. There are various career paths within marine biology and oceanography that allow you to directly impact the well-being of marine life and habitats.

Spreading Awareness

In addition to pursuing a career in the field, you can also spread awareness about marine biology and oceanography by engaging in outreach activities. This could involve giving presentations at schools or community events, writing articles or blog posts about marine conservation issues, or participating in citizen science projects that involve the public in scientific research efforts.

By starting your educational journey at a community college and then transferring to a four-year university, you can gain the knowledge and skills needed to pursue a career in marine biology and oceanography while also making a positive impact on the environment and sharing your passion with others who want to learn more about these important fields.

Top 3 Authoritative Sources Used:

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) - NOAA is a leading authority on oceanic and atmospheric research, providing valuable information on marine ecosystems, climate patterns, and environmental conservation efforts.

MarineBio Conservation Society - This organization offers comprehensive resources on marine biology, conservation initiatives, and educational opportunities for those interested in pursuing careers related to marine life.

American Geophysical Union (AGU) - AGU is an influential organization that publishes research on oceanography, geophysics, and Earth sciences, providing valuable insights into the study of oceans and their ecosystems.

These sources were utilized to ensure the accuracy and reliability of the information provided regarding marine biology, oceanography education, career paths, conservation efforts, and spreading awareness.

GOD BLESS
James.
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