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What type of work environment would a Web Designer encounter

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1: what typical hours would be involved
2: a lot of traveling
3: would i require to relocate
#business #tech #web-design #design #career

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4 answers

Rod’s Answer

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Working in Web Design is a great choice. There are many ways to contribute and many ways that the work get done. So easier questions first:

  • Web design work is available every where so no relocation is necessary but on the other hand if you want to relocate you can.
  • Normally there is not much travelling until you get into a senior position and need to visit clients.

The environment:

You can work by yourself as a freelancer, in a web design company or as part of a big team in a multinational company. I suggest you start your working career in a smallish web design company where you will get the chance to try your hand on a wide range of skills. In the UK most people start in web design after going to university.


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Tejas’s Answer

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Hello Trevor,

<span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">Typically, web designer will spend most of their working day on a computer, this allows a certain freedom to the web designers work from home. </span>


<span style="color: rgb(93, 103, 106);">1: what typical hours would be involved : This is very relative question but typically 40 hours per week. Sometimes, you may have to work long hours to solve critical problems or meet deadlines. You have to w</span>ork in a moderately competitive atmosphere in which project deadlines must be met.

<span style="color: rgb(93, 103, 106);">2: a lot of traveling: There is no traveling involved here; many companies provide work from home / remote working option too. </span>

<span style="color: rgb(93, 103, 106);">3: would i require to relocate: Ideally no, but to get better opportunities you may think to relocate. </span>


<span style="color: rgb(93, 103, 106);">Web designer requires low to medium interaction with team members; mostly communication happens via telephone or group chat. Good Luck!</span>

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Tobias’s Answer

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I'm a software engineer but I've worked with quite a few designers and have seen their hours, locations, and travel vary from company-to-company.

At this point, there can be as little travel as you'd like if your company or clients are okay with you working remotely and dialing into calls via video conference. I've seen some companies require their employees, including designers, come into the office and work the standard 9am - 5pm so that they overlap as much as possible with the people in the office that may have questions. I've also seen some companies not care which hours you work or where you do the work from as long as you're getting your work done and can answer questions in a timely manner so the design process can run efficiently.

There are benefits and drawbacks to working from home or working in the office, but as someone who works in a creative field make sure you have the quiet space you need in order to focus and get your work done well. Interruptions are costly in the creative roles and too many can derail an entire day. There is research around that, so whatever your company asks of you feel confident in asking that they provide you a productive environment to do your work.
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Hao’s Answer

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This depends on the type of company you want to work for. Two examples include agencies vs a "standard" company. For agencies, your work maybe a lot more varied as you typically have many different clients and projects. Because of this, the pace tends to be quicker which can lead to working longer hours. There can be more travel depending if you need to visit the client's office. Relocation really depends on if you want to work for one of the larger agencies vs a smaller local shop. The size of the agency can also have an affect on all these things.

A "standard" company, in this example, is working in-house for any company (Google, Adobe, Amazon, etc) where you'll be primarily working on stuff related to that company. Because of that, there tends to be more processes and the pace and working hours is more consistent. You might be traveling less or not at all depending on how distributed your team is. Also, if remote work is not a thing, then you'll need to relocate to one of their offices.

This is just a general guideline but each company and agency is totally different. I've also worked for both types so this is drawn from personal experience and anecdotes from colleges.
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