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How would you describe the level of stress being a registered nurse bring on?

#nursing #nurse #registered-nurses #medicine #healthcare #hospital-and-healthcare

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Monica’s Answer

Hi Gabriela,

The stress level depends what unit you work on. If you’re in ICU, it's usually critical situations that you're in, however if you’re in the general floor, most patients are stable so it's usually low stress unless you have many patients.

Overall, it can be stressful in the beginning, but once you get your muscle memory going, it get easier. Plus you're not the only nurse in your floor so you'll have folks help you out.

I would say the stress is worth it and could be very rewarding!

Best of luck!

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kathy’s Answer

Nursing is a very fulfilling and rewarding career. You will definitely make a difference in the lives of your patients. That said, it is a stressful job as you will be responsible for multiple patients ( each with their own needs) and you must be able to balance your time wisely. You will likely form strong friendships with your co-workers. Some settings are more stressful than others. In general, outpatient roles are less stressful than inpatient units. Nurses with long careers have learned how to manage their stress and take care of themselves so they can return the next day to take care of their patients. Good Luck
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Marie’s Answer

I feel like nursing is always stressful regardless of where you work. Peoples lives are in your hands. One simple mistake could end a life. I worked in Neonatal intensive care and my fragile patients lives could change quickly so you must be able to recognize the signs. Critical thinking skills is a must. A stay in the unit was a rolcoaster of emotions with patients and the parents. Codes and death can be difficult to process. Healthy copping skills is needed but not always available. Many nurses from my unit are on medication or in therapy to help process these emotions. I would say the stress is present but the positive out comes makes all the mental stress worth it.

Marie recommends the following next steps:

Develope copping
Seek help if needed(sharing stressors helps)
Thrive on positive outcomes
Take care of yourself
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