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What knowledge is required to wire buildings for electrical sevice?

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Sean’s Answer

There are many things you must be knowledgeable about in order to proper wire a building. You must learn to understand how to properly read the National electrical code(NEC), do load calculations for all the electrical device throughout the building, and you must learn the mechanical skills to do the work.
The best answer here might be another question. How do I LEARN the knowledge required to wire buildings.?

The Electrical Training Alliance is a nationwide apprentice program, with over 250 training centers throughout the states. The IBEW (electricians union) gets you a job during the week so you can learn the mechanical skills required to learn the trade. Then usual one day or 2 nights a week you go to school to gain all the knowledge how how to do load calculations, electrical safety, theory, and much more.
This Union electrical apprenticeship is also TUITION FREE!.So you earn money during the week, while learning a career at the same time, and it only takes 4-5 years. There is no better program in America to learn the electrical trade. 4 years of this apprenticeship program and you will be able to answer this question, and many more.

electricaltrainingalliance.org
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Kenneth’s Answer

There is vast knowledge that is needed to wire buildings for electrical services. Is the used for residential? Is this a commercial property? You must determine calculations that include load demand so that you have a big enough service (or power) to sustain the needs of the building. You must determine what type of devices will be utilizing the power brought into the building (i.e. lights, computers, HVAC units). I would highly suggest to get all the details you can about any electrical project and then cross reference the electrical needs with the National Electrical Code for proper and safe installation.
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Bob’s Answer

how to read blueprints
how to interpret the rules and regulations for building codes
how to interpret the NEC (National Electric Code)
how to use power tools
how to install switching devices, cables, tubing, and conduits, grounding, bonding etc. (many other items but this is just a few)
how to plan and complete an electrical installation for a dwelling and or a commercial building (The question was not specific but those are just two examples)
electrical safety rules and procedures, NFPA, OSHA etc.
Authority having jurisdiction for permits and their requirements which will supersede NEC as long as it is equal to or greater than in requirements
Licensing requirements for you as the installer (industrial does not require in most cases, public work will require)

Bob recommends the following next steps:

Get a sponsor and or what ever the requirment may be and go to school. 4 years of schooling and you can become a union (IBEW) and or non union. Your choice
Trade school
College for Electrical engineering
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Chris’s Answer

Hi Jean, This Chris from California. How’s it going ? It takes about 4 to 5 years of schooling over here from an apprenticeship. We have a few schools that provide that. You get paid to learn an awesome trade who helps everyone in need of power and lighting. It is a fun and challenging career but also dangerous if Safety is taken lightly. The knowledge of the NFPA 70 NEC and NFPA 70E is what we must learn to be a successful Electrician. Hope this helps with your question. Have a good one and God bless you and your family, be safe.
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Kevin’s Answer

A good knowledge of the electrical code, or knowing how to find the answers to your questions in the code is foremost if you're looking to do this as a career. Knowledge of industry practices and wiring techniques, and depending on the size of the job or crew you may have to do everything yourself from the conduit work and load calculations, to digging the ditch and driving the ground rods.
I'm with See on this one - a good 4 year apprenticeship will give you all you need so I'd recommend starting there if this is a career that interests you.

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Duncan’s Answer

To build an electrical service.

You should have clarified your question.
I hope this answer your question.

The knowledge you need to build electrical service is:

You need to be well experience in this field.
you need to identify your specialisation in electrical field.
you need to have required tool for the electrical works
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Stephen’s Answer

The knowledge you need to build electrical service is:

You must be a licensed electrician in your state or locality.

The licensing begins usually at
A) Apprentice
(1st 4-5 years or 8,000 working hours)
This person must be supervised by a
B) Journeyman
(Evaluation tested by examination and proof of working 8,000 hours)
All work done by this person must be supervised by
C) Master
(Evaluation after 4,000 working hours and must hold Journeyman license for 2 years, so total of 12,000 hours and roughly 7 years experience)

This is from a licensing standpoint.
The apprentice cannot work alone. The journeyman can work alone but must work under a master electrician that has an electrical contractor license as well with minimum liability insurance for the projects they take on.

The knowledge of building the actual service comes from years of experience and knowledge of the National Electrical Code.
The experience comes from hand-on work with someone who has done it before. This work can be hard and dangerous. This is why experience is valuable, and having it should get you a good paying job or contract.

Look into local apprenticeship schools if you’re interested. Some of which are the NJATC and IEC in the United States.

I’m a Master Electrician in the State of Texas.
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Vern’s Answer

For the vast majority of projects, an engineer will determine the electrical load, and specify what size service will be required. A qualified electrician will take the information given, and determine the best installation method. Typically, this type of work will not be given to someone new to the trade. Often, an experienced Journeyman will be partnered up with someone learning the craft. It is their responsibility to pay attention to detail, and take what they have learned to further their knowledge and career. The National Electrical Code, which is NFPA 70, is the bible of the trade. I strongly recommend an IBEW apprenticeship program to anyone who is seriously considering being an electrician. This is a career, not a job. I've been working in this field for 35 years, and don't regret my choice.
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Ted’s Answer

Typically you would have to work as an apprentice for an electrical company for four years. After that you are eligible to test for your Journeyman's license. After two more years you would be eligible to test for your Master's license. You must read and understand the National Electrical Code (NEC), which is also known as National Fire Protection Association (NFPA)-70. Each state has slightly different requirements, but for Texas, you can visit the Texas Department of Licensing and Regulations (TDLR) at https://www.tdlr.texas.gov/electricians/elec.htm.

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Bob’s Answer

how to read blueprints
how to interpret the rules and regulations for building codes
how to interpret the NEC (National Electric Code)
how to use power tools
how to install switching devices, cables, tubing, and conduits, grounding, bonding etc. (many other items but this is just a few)
how to plan and complete an electrical installation for a dwelling and or a commercial building (The question was not specific but those are just two examples)
electrical safety rules and procedures, NFPA, OSHA etc.
Authority having jurisdiction for permits and their requirements which will supersede NEC as long as it is equal to or greater than in requirements
Licensing requirements for you as the installer (industrial does not require in most cases, public work will require)

Bob recommends the following next steps:

Get a sponsor and or what ever the requirment may be and go to school. 4 years of schooling and you can become a union (IBEW) and or non union. Your choice
Trade school
College for Electrical engineering
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Joseph’s Answer

First of all you need to have a stamped set of drawings for bid . Next you need to know where your local utility company service is derived from . Where it it enters the building and what type service it will Single phase or Three phase . We have just barely begun this answer . I need an RFI to the tenant , if any , for power distribution.
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Charles’s Answer

You will learn everything you need to know from starting as helper. Say these things at an interview and I'm sure you'll get a job:

1. I don't use my phone at work.
2. I work hard and follow instructions
2. I'm hungry and want to the learn the trade
3. I'm teachable
4. I'm responsible
5. I'm drug/alcohol free

And practice these habits and you'll succeed. There is no way anyone can tell you what is required to wire a building and you'd retain that information to actual perform the work. You have to learn by placing your hands on the wire, conduit, boxes, etc. Now once your working in the trade by day, be sure to study by night. If you want it bad enough, you'll get it. Licensed electricians can make up to 100k. The field needs people that follow the 5 rules above. Good luck.
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Marcos Miguel’s Answer

You necessarily have to study electricity, from the most basic, since in this way you will gradually understand residential, commercial, buildings and even industrial installations.
This is not overnight, do not let yourself participate with short courses of less than 1 year.
The minimum study I recommend is a degree in electricity, from a serious and qualified institute.
Talking about electricity could confuse you more, study and practice little by little. Once you finish your studies, look for people with experience and be an assistant, that will strengthen your knowledge.
Regards
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ulbano’s Answer

You must know the loads of the building in question and their types of supply and rating and you must be know how long those loads will be working,earthing supply and safety wise how many partitions will the building have most important were will the supply come from so you know the position of the intake
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Juan’s Answer

Blueprints, knowing where the wire plus piping goes, do not do this live it will hurt or explode if you make the hot wire touch the white wire be very cautious, use your extreme eye vision, learn in the blueprints where light switches, or lights go exactly, some Journyman will not teach, some will, some will give u an option or opportunities,
Some do not want failure, be careful how u wire the building like I said before dont wire hot make sure it is off because you will trip the breaker

Juan recommends the following next steps:

Make sure with blueprints where is goes
Measure the light switch or light or outlet
Your piping skill will be needed to reach a 4sq box
Don’t wire hot you will trip the breaker
Residential and commercial is not the same be careful
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