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What is the most dangerous part of being an electrician?

I am a student in the 11th grade and from other studies about me I have the potential of going into the Electrician range and so I wanted to know what the job is like and how does it work. #job #career #electrician #electrical


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Robert’s Answer

Arc Flash or electrocution. Arc flash is when power short makes it's way to ground and the arc reaches the heat of the sun. Electrocution occurs when you become the path to ground. All electrical power is trying to get to ground and will follow the path of least resistance. For example: you have a motor load which is 5amps. If you are between the power source and the motor and provide a path to ground you have become the path of least resistance and the 5amp will flow through you. In most cases 5amps flowing through a person would result in death as the blood would boil and heart failure would occur. The person would also be badly burned.

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Daniel’s Answer

There are many dangers in field depending on the field you work in.
In my field, I work in the industrial chemical field. So as an electrician I need gas monitors to monitor the atmosphere for flammable vapors during my troubleshooting. These in the trade are known as class 1 division 1 environments covered in depth in both the NFPA 70E AND NEC.
The most common hazard faced by electricians are ergonomic and fall hazards as with most trades. Trade wise actual electrocution are rare in the trained electrician.
ARC FLASH/FAULT injuries and deaths are by far the most confusing statistic but also the most critical. The requirements from OSHA do not fairly represent the actual hazards of arc flash/fault injuries. Often requiring 3 or individuals to be hospitalized or atleast 1 fatality to become a recordable statistic.
At the end of the day, you have to realize you are the one who determines how dangerous the work is. If you are working with live voltage you are working with a force that is moving at close to the speed of light. In a catastrophic failure is hurling gases and ejecta at temperatures that rival that of a star. So as long as you are quick as that or tough as that, it's the safest trade in the world.

Great answer, and let provide the following on the same topic. There are two external trainings one can take at minimal cost for their safety and building their stackable skill. 1. OSHA 10 - This will cover in part essential parts of NFPA 70E Electrical Safety. The BEST deal going right now is CareerSafe. An online program and only $25.00 as true bargain. 2. NFPA70E - A good deal from WorksEd @ $39.95. It was I believe $25.00 as well, but prices increase, nothing ever goes down. These two courses when include in a resume are standouts. But more importantly, provide for your safety. Have a great day, John John R Smith Jr ¦ Facility Management

Good answer Stephen Van Dusen

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Shane’s Answer

The electrical field is diverse in environment, conditions, and disciplines.
The dangers are similar across the range however. As you start in the field you will be trained on the danger level your exposed to and the levels will be adequate with your ability. Most work is performed on dead or de-energized circuits. When required exposure to live circuitry for maintenance or repair has a number of steps to keep you safe in performing the work.
Risk and accidents take place when these are not followed or skipped.
Make it a priority to follow rules for safety and then you increase the chance of getting home safe every night.

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Donald’s Answer

The most dangerous part of being an Electrician is trying to do a task that you have not been properly trained on, or have not had the experience required to properly identify what is safe and what is dangerous

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Klayton’s Answer

Hi Sean,

Every job has the potential to be dangerous if you don't keep your mind on what you are doing and not wearing your Personal Protection Equipment. As an Electrician, you are working with a source of energy that can be fatal if not treated with respect. Make sure you de-energize, lockout and verify the circuit is dead before working on it. I wish you well with your chosen career and I hope to meet you in the field 😁

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Joshua’s Answer

Most of the answers are electricity related so far, but the real day to day danger are more general construction related. You learn to avoid electrical hazards, but falling overhead objects, ladder falls, scaffolding falls, slipping, and heat exhaustion are the more common.

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Sam’s Answer

If you adhere to all safety measures, there is little danger. You should never "work" on energized equipment. You can test and must stay clear of energized components while testing, but when you set the leads down, you are no longer testing and you are ready to work. De-energize the equipment then. While testing you there is a wide variety of necessary PPE (personal protection equipment) to where while testing. Everything from eye protection to arc flash suits.

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Brian’s Answer

Electrical work can be dangerous. Often times you're working in enclosed areas trying to understand new equipment and working with new people. But if you're working with professional people for an employer that cares about safety, these dangers are manageable.

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