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How long do you need to study to become a bio technician

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Ravindra’s Answer

Hey Dahlia,,

Biology technicians assist scientists with performing research, experiments, and lab tests, as well as developing products. They work in fields including biotechnology, medical research, microbiology, and pharmaceutical research. Biology technicians prepare, calibrate, and maintain lab equipment. They also obtain samples of various specimens and prepare them for lab analysis, analyze data gained during experiments, and prepare reports about their conclusions.

Biology technicians must display attention to detail and be able to cooperate with coworkers. They need skills in analysis, writing, critical thinking, and verbal communications; as well as familiarity with software for gathering and studying data; and graphics, spreadsheet, and word processing software. Additionally, they must be proficient with lab instruments and automated equipment. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, biological technicians earned a mean annual salary of $44,500 as of May 2018. Let's look at the steps involved in becoming a biology technician.

Step 1: Obtain a Bachelor's Degree
Step 2: Get Lab Experience
Step 3: Receive Job Training
Step 4: Join a Professional Group
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Steven’s Answer

Hey Dahlia, this is an interesting question. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) a bachelors degree from a university is required to become a bio-technician, which is an endeavor that can take anywhere from 3-5 years, depending on where you go. Typically, a bachelors of science (B.S.) degree in relating fields is the best bet to getting this type of job. Majors include biochemistry, biology, chemistry, or a related engineering field, like chemical or biomedical. Bio-technicians can also study and attain their Masters or Doctorate degree, which adds a total of 6-7 years of schooling after your high school diploma, generally. For an overlook, visit the BLS website about bio-technicians here:

https://www.bls.gov/ooh/life-physical-and-social-science/biological-technicians.htm

However, if you know you are interested in a specific field of biological processes, many different companies, ranging from large corporations to smaller startups, will hire lab technicians without a college degree, so it is not exactly necessary to become a technician. Sometimes, what matters more than studying in these cases is having personal experience in the specific bio industry that interests you. A college degree guarantees that you have had some experience inside of a lab and understand the basic procedures and safety, but all of the skills required in an industry can definitely be learned on the job given proper training and mentorship opportunities.

There have been so many new bio-companies emerging so it is really important to see what about biology interests you the most and try to focus in on that (i.e. pharma, agricultural,beverages,research, or bio-materials) . If you understand what you would like to be doing 5-10 years from this point, see what kind of opportunities you should be looking for to advance you to that point. I think, if you are looking to work with the government or law enforcement, than you should go ahead and go the traditional route and get your Bachelors of Science from an accredited university. Although college education is still the most common route to this career, it is not the only way anymore. Some job training takes up to 6 months long, and generally provide new workers with all the resources, education, and materials they need to be successful in their position.

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Ravindra’s Answer

Hey Dahlia,,

Biology technicians assist scientists with performing research, experiments, and lab tests, as well as developing products. They work in fields including biotechnology, medical research, microbiology, and pharmaceutical research. Biology technicians prepare, calibrate, and maintain lab equipment. They also obtain samples of various specimens and prepare them for lab analysis, analyze data gained during experiments, and prepare reports about their conclusions.

Biology technicians must display attention to detail and be able to cooperate with coworkers. They need skills in analysis, writing, critical thinking, and verbal communications; as well as familiarity with software for gathering and studying data; and graphics, spreadsheet, and word processing software. Additionally, they must be proficient with lab instruments and automated equipment. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, biological technicians earned a mean annual salary of $44,500 as of May 2018. Let's look at the steps involved in becoming a biology technician.

Step 1: Obtain a Bachelor's Degree
Step 2: Get Lab Experience
Step 3: Receive Job Training
Step 4: Join a Professional Group
0