Skip to main content
7 answers
8
Updated 832 views

What Classes Should I Take Before To Aquire A Job In I.T

#Information Technology #information-technology

Thank you comment icon Being in IT Organization for the last 5 years ,I have learnt that there are various different fields under IT Organization. Before recommending a specific domain , I would suggest to identify your interest , the different teams involved in IT could be developers , test engineers , Cloud administrators (Windows or Unix) , Network Engineers , Business Analyst, Security Analysts , Monitoring professionals , Project Managers ,etc. Also there are various basic certifications you could do which could help in your IT journey , for example ITIL,PMP,Lean,AWS,Linux,Agile,Scrum Master.. If you could provide more details about your question regarding IT and your field of interest, would be happy to answer. Thanks ! Bhagyashree Bodhare

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

8

7 answers


0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

James Constantine’s Answer

Hello Zachary,

Ever wondered why landing a job seems like a tough nut to crack?

There are numerous factors at play when it comes to the challenges of job hunting. Here's a rundown of some of the main culprits:

1. Competition: The job market is a battlefield with countless qualified contenders all vying for a limited number of job slots. This fierce rivalry can make it tough for you to shine brighter than other candidates, particularly in sectors where job seekers outnumber job openings.

2. Skills Mismatch: The evolving job market often demands specific skill sets or qualifications. If you don't match these, you might find it hard to secure a job. This mismatch between what employers want and what job seekers offer is another hurdle.

3. Economic Factors: The state of the economy can also dictate job availability. When the economy takes a hit, companies may cut back on their workforce or stop hiring altogether, making it even more challenging for you to find new job opportunities.

4. Lack of Experience: Even entry-level positions often demand some experience. This can be a stumbling block for fresh graduates or those switching fields. Without relevant experience under your belt, competing with seasoned applicants can be tough.

5. Networking: In today's job market, who you know can be as important as what you know. Many job openings are filled through referrals or networking. If your professional network isn't robust, you might find it difficult to tap into these hidden job markets or secure interviews.

6. Location: Where you live can also impact your job prospects. If you reside in an area with scarce job opportunities or high unemployment rates, your job hunt might be even more challenging.

In a nutshell, the struggle of finding a job can be traced back to factors like cut-throat competition, skills mismatch, economic fluctuations, lack of experience, networking hurdles, and geographic constraints.

Top 3 Credible Sources Used:

Harvard Business Review: A treasure trove of insights and analysis on a wide array of topics, including business, management, and employment trends.

Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS): The go-to place for official data and statistics on labor market trends, employment rates, and industry-specific information.

Forbes: A trusted source for business news and insights, offering a wealth of information on career advice, job market trends, and employment strategies.

May God bless you!
James Constantine.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Joe’s Answer

Hi Zachary,
The IT field is broad with multiple options. For example you can choose to be a programmer, designer, business analysts, engineer, systems administrator and many more.

My suggestion would be get a focus area. Alternatively at this point depending on where you are in your educational pathway, pick a broader college degree. Example of majors: computer science, computer engineering, electrical engineering, etc. you can also pick focus area like data science, analytics, etc which some universities offer.

All the Best!

0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Brandon’s Answer

Are you desiring to be a programmer, a security analyst, a systems administrator? Each of these paths has wildly different class loads.  Pick a direction and run with it. If you decide to change direction later, it's totally OK as your experiences in one part of IT can actually make you stronger in another.    For example, a systems administrator with a background in programming can be proficient in scripting automation tasks that save companies a lot of money.  On the other hand, a security guru turned programmer will be able to help his/her team write more secure code. 

I am a Sales Engineer with Dell.  I help enterprise IT departments choose client hardware (desktops, laptops, and thin clients).  However, I also advise customers on their computer management software.  For my job, I need to know a little bit about networking, enterprise client administration, hardware, and software scripting.   I've also had jobs in networking, system administration, and consulting that all give me context when conversing with my customers who are experts in their field.

0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Seth’s Answer

I highly recommend some background in networking at a minimum. There are several subdisciplines in IT that are discussed above, but so many of the basic troubleshooting and support boils down to basic networking and networking needs.

Beyond that, it's all about what you're passionate about, and learning the specifics of that area. Not sure yet? Try something. Often, just getting started with an entry-level helpdesk position will get you exposure to ALL KINDS of other teams within IT, which might help you see what they do on a daily basis and decide whether or not that's something you're interested in.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Sunny’s Answer

I would start with A+ classes and try to get A+ certified. A+ certification can give you knowledge in all topics in IT to really set your base.

0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Josh’s Answer

That is a really broad question. I would start with what part of IT are you hoping to go into and what skills or education do you have to support that? Once you have that you can target a specific part of I.T. and position yourself properly.

0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Tony’s Answer

I would basically concur with the other answers. However, I would ask in addition, what do you enjoy doing? Are you a problem solver? In my career, I have found the hardware/networking folks were those who enjoyed 'making the pieces fit together'. Do enjoy the more logic and math driven challenges over the 'hand on'? Programming is a solid choice in that case. If you are a people person and enjoy helping others, IT Support can be a fulfilling career.

I agree with the idea that you are not locked in to any one path, but after you have invested in one path, it can be frustrating to start back at the beginning again. Choose something you can love doing.

Tony recommends the following next steps:

The first job is the hardest - so do something that makes you stand out from the crowd.
For networking and hardware, you are going to need a certification. Community Colleges usually have a certification or an association with one of the certification entities.
For programming, find a language that is accepted in the industry. You can afford to try one of the more exotic ones after you have a few successes behind you. I, personally, would choose a Microsoft Product just because the business world runs on that right now..
Look for a position with a company with a path with a chance to move up and then make yourself needed.
0