4 answers

What Classes Should I Take Before To Aquire A Job In I.T

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100% of 4 Pros
Updated Viewed 66 times
4
100% of 4 Pros

4 answers

Brandon’s Answer

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Are you desiring to be a programmer, a security analyst, a systems administrator? Each of these paths has wildly different class loads.  Pick a direction and run with it. If you decide to change direction later, it's totally OK as your experiences in one part of IT can actually make you stronger in another.    For example, a systems administrator with a background in programming can be proficient in scripting automation tasks that save companies a lot of money.  On the other hand, a security guru turned programmer will be able to help his/her team write more secure code. 

I am a Sales Engineer with Dell.  I help enterprise IT departments choose client hardware (desktops, laptops, and thin clients).  However, I also advise customers on their computer management software.  For my job, I need to know a little bit about networking, enterprise client administration, hardware, and software scripting.   I've also had jobs in networking, system administration, and consulting that all give me context when conversing with my customers who are experts in their field.

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Tony’s Answer

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I would basically concur with the other answers. However, I would ask in addition, what do you enjoy doing? Are you a problem solver? In my career, I have found the hardware/networking folks were those who enjoyed 'making the pieces fit together'. Do enjoy the more logic and math driven challenges over the 'hand on'? Programming is a solid choice in that case. If you are a people person and enjoy helping others, IT Support can be a fulfilling career.

I agree with the idea that you are not locked in to any one path, but after you have invested in one path, it can be frustrating to start back at the beginning again. Choose something you can love doing.

Tony recommends the following next steps:

  • The first job is the hardest - so do something that makes you stand out from the crowd.
  • For networking and hardware, you are going to need a certification. Community Colleges usually have a certification or an association with one of the certification entities.
  • For programming, find a language that is accepted in the industry. You can afford to try one of the more exotic ones after you have a few successes behind you. I, personally, would choose a Microsoft Product just because the business world runs on that right now..
  • Look for a position with a company with a path with a chance to move up and then make yourself needed.
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Joe’s Answer

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Hi Zachary,
The IT field is broad with multiple options. For example you can choose to be a programmer, designer, business analysts, engineer, systems administrator and many more.

My suggestion would be get a focus area. Alternatively at this point depending on where you are in your educational pathway, pick a broader college degree. Example of majors: computer science, computer engineering, electrical engineering, etc. you can also pick focus area like data science, analytics, etc which some universities offer.

All the Best!

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Josh’s Answer

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That is a really broad question. I would start with what part of IT are you hoping to go into and what skills or education do you have to support that? Once you have that you can target a specific part of I.T. and position yourself properly.

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