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what seasons of the year are toughest for your job

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Annie’s Answer

I work with kids so while they are in school it is the toughest. Trying to work around school schedules, visiting some kids at lunch and personally not wanting to work into the evenings - it’s a challenge!! Sumer vacation is great, I can see kids all day long at home.

Some office jobs require clients to come into the office. So those providers might work till 5 PM most days and stay open late 1-2x per week.

Thank you comment icon Therapists truly do have odd schedules at times, which can be awesome for those who like flexible schedules. We have to accommodate our clients' school and work schedules, while also balancing our own home and social lives. Excellent time management is essential to our role, and our stress levels. Ariel Place, MA, LPCC
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Sikawayi’s Answer

Hello Hailey, great question, the hardest time for me to deal with clients is Christmas. During this season most people seems to be in a better mood. But for others like some of the clients I deal with who view Christmas as a dark and depressing time. Some people who want to move on with their life and others who just want to remain unhappy. The problem is I can want happiness for them, but they have to want it for themselves. Best of luck
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Ariel’s Answer

Holidays are one of the most difficult times of the year for all types of my clients. I will share examples of how below:
- college kids return home and may find that everyone's lives continued in their absence, and not everyone is able to make time to visit with them for the period they are home
- military personnel return home on R&R and others are busy with their holiday and are unable to travel to them, often asking the military member to do even more traveling to others
- disruptions to routines (i.e. getting up and going to school, work, then coming home and getting this this or this done) can be unsettling
- people's views of holidays and traditions often change dramatically as individuals and families age over the years, and this can be very upsetting those who value traditions, and frustrating for those who are ready to let go of traditions
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