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What other careers include psychology other than a therapist?

I loved being in psychology classes and learning about it, but I don’t think a therapist would be a good career for me. #psychology #clinical-psychology #therapy #therapist

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Emma’s Answer

Hello Kirsten,

Psychology is a fascinating field with so many career options beyond just being a therapist. For instance, you could delve into research psychology, where you'd get to run exciting experiments and studies to uncover more about how humans behave. Or, you might be interested in industrial-organizational psychology, where you'd get to enhance workplace environments and boost employee happiness.

If you're intrigued by the legal system, forensic psychology could be for you, where you'd assess individuals involved in court cases. School psychologists have the rewarding job of helping students thrive emotionally and acadically, while sports psychologists have the unique opportunity to work with athletes to boost their performance.

Health psychologists have a crucial role in exploring how our minds affect our physical health, often working in healthcare environments. If you're a people person, a human resources specialist role could be a good fit, where you'd use your understanding of human behavior to manage employee relationships and recruit new talent. Lastly, counseling psychologists have the fulfilling job of guiding individuals in making key decisions about their education, careers, and personal growth.

There's a whole world of psychology-related careers out there for you to explore, each one offering a unique and rewarding path. Find the one that aligns with your passions and strengths, and you're sure to find a fulfilling career in the field. Wishing you all the best on your journey!
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Saiber’s Answer

There are a lot of careers other than a therapist with a degree in Psychology.

Since it is based on human behaviour - you can apply to anything starting from market research, to human resources, to teaching and coaching.
A lot of people go into research as well.

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Fallyn’s Answer

I suggest looking into getting your Masters in Social Work. With this, I'm an elementary school counselor and this is great if you love working with kids. There's more action and responsibility as you're also a part of the team to create a positive school environment.

After college, (I was a government and politics major) I thought I was going to be a lawyer. I then learned about Social Work and wanted to have a job that had more of a service aspect to it. I received my Masters in Social Work which is only a two year program. Social Work is a great field because it's so broad and you can do so many things with it and work in many different environments- schools, hospitals, private companies etc.
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Shannon’s Answer

Some careers that include psychology: teacher, lawyer, anyone in leadership or management. Psychology is a great base or bachelors area of study; and then you could apply your skills in your masters study or further career development. Good luck!

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Kimberly’s Answer

Great question; I have undergraduate and graduate degrees in psychology and I currently work as a therapist, but prior to obtaining my advanced degree I worked as a case worker at Child Protective Services. I also worked in a hospital's NICU as a case manager. I was a high school teacher for many years because I also have a degree in English, and now I work with teens who have mental health issues but also have some sort of learning disability that affects their education. I used my experiences with work and life to build on my undergraduate degree in psychology to form a path for my graduate studies and area of specialization in therapy. Good luck!

Kimberly recommends the following next steps:

Do a search on job sites such as Glassdoor and Monster to find jobs that require an undergraduate degree in psychology.
Think about what population interests you; do you want to work with little children, teens, adults, the elderly?
Think about the feasibility of graduate school; time, money, student loans, etc.
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Shannon’s Answer

Artificial intelligence, forensics, investigators, educator-- so many! The key is to get experience as well as the degree.
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Lin’s Answer

Hi Kirsten! Thanks for your question. I work in user research. Years ago we were called human factors engineers. While the majority have at least a Master's in Applied Psych, Industrial Psych, Behavioral Psych, etc. (and many have their Ph.D) more and more we see people entering the field with just a Bachelor's degree in Psych. If you are fascinated by humans and how we learn/perceive/remember, and like to talk to people, and like to do research, and present results, I would encourage you to investigate the usability/user experience research field.

On a typical day I could be showing concepts to consumers to get an idea if what works/doesn't work, could be in a retail store observing employees using online tools to try to identify pain points and opportunities, running a focus group to get insights into a brand, or even visiting consumers in their homes to see how they use tech at home. There is always something new to learn!

Good luck!
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David’s Answer

I have a bachelor's degree in psychology. After graduation, i worked as an orderly in nursing homes/adult day care programs and then applied for a masters program in Occupational Therapy. I had to take some prerequisite courses (statistics, anatomy and physiology) but my bachelors degree provide fulfilled many of the prerequisites. My psych background has been very useful in my careers as an OT, helping me to understand the motivations of my patients. OT school is not easy to get into, especially in urban areas but there are lots of jobs for OTs in schools, rehab centers, nursing homes, home health that pay well. The field is changing; when I graduated 40 years ago, one could practice with a bachelors degree but now you need a masters (3 years after a bachelors) and soon the entry level will be pHD (another year at least).
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Dr. Ray’s Answer

Dear Kirsten,

Having an undergraduate degree in psychology involves good news and bad news. The bad news is that there are very few jobs that specifically require a bachelor's degree in psychology. However the good news is that there are a ton of jobs that require a bachelor's degree of some sort, and a psychology degree is a plus in any field that involves working with people.

The majority of people who obtain graduate degrees in psychology work in the clinical or counseling fields. However there are many other areas of specialization that involve research into human behavior. Psychology is basically a science and psychologists perform research in such areas as neuroscience, social interaction, the basis of learning and memory, perception, etc. There are not as many of these jobs in these areas, many of which involve teaching at a university level, but the opportunities are certainly there. The American Psychological Association's web site (www.apa.org) has information about careers in psychology.

Good luck in your career pursuits.
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James Constantine’s Answer

Hello Kirsten!

Alternative Careers in Psychology

Psychology is a diverse field that offers various career paths outside of traditional therapy. Here are some alternative careers that involve psychology:

School Psychologist: School psychologists work in educational settings, helping children and adolescents with learning, behavioral, and emotional challenges. They collaborate with teachers, parents, and other professionals to create individualized education plans and promote a healthy learning environment.

Sports Psychologist: Sports psychologists work with athletes to improve their mental performance, helping them cope with stress, anxiety, and other challenges that may affect their game. They use psychological principles to enhance focus, motivation, and confidence in sports.

Industrial-Organizational Psychologist: Industrial-organizational psychologists apply psychological principles to the workplace, focusing on employee selection, training, and development, as well as organizational effectiveness. They help companies improve productivity and employee satisfaction.

Forensic Psychologist: Forensic psychologists combine psychology with the legal system, working with law enforcement, courts, and correctional facilities. They assess the psychological aspects of criminal behavior, evaluate the competency of defendants, and provide recommendations for rehabilitation and risk assessment.

Neuropsychologist: Neuropsychologists study the relationship between brain function and behavior. They work with patients who have neurological disorders, such as traumatic brain injury or dementia, to diagnose and treat cognitive, emotional, and behavioral problems.

Psychometrist: Psychometrists specialize in the administration, interpretation, and scoring of psychological tests. They work in various settings, including clinical, research, and educational institutions.

Health Psychologist: Health psychologists study the psychological factors that influence physical health and well-being. They work with patients to help them cope with chronic illness, pain management, and stress reduction.

These alternative careers in psychology provide a wide range of opportunities for those who are passionate about the field but may not want to pursue a career as a therapist. Each of these roles requires a strong foundation in psychology and can offer a unique and fulfilling professional experience.

Authoritative Reference Titles:

American Psychological Association (APA) - The APA is the largest and most authoritative organization in the field of psychology, providing resources and guidelines for research, practice, and education.

Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology (SIOP) - SIOP is a professional organization dedicated to promoting research, practice, and education in the field of industrial-organizational psychology.

Association for Psychological Science (APS) - APS is a leading organization dedicated to advancing the scientific understanding of human behavior and cognition through research and education.

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