9 answers

What degree(s) should I look into if I want to work with computers for a living. i.e. building them, repairing them?

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I'm currently studying for a Bachelor's degree in Modern Music - Drums, but it's not at all bringing joy to my life. Typically, when I feel overworked or stressed my go-to thing to do is video games. When it comes to this kind of hardware I have definitely encountered problems (as you do) with computers and consoles.What clicked with me was that working with my hands on computer hardware is actually very entertaining to me and having the knowledge to solve problems relating to this is something I'm definitely interested in. Relating to me overall question: 1) What degrees should I look at for working with computers in this fashion? 2) What are the top 5 colleges that would offer the degree that I'm looking for? #computer #computer-science #computer #computer-science #computer-software #technology #computer

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9 answers

Jessica’s Answer

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I agree with what several of the answers before me suggested: Computer Science could help get you in the door to jobs that require working with computer hardware, but I also have a couple of other suggestions.

1. You say that you enjoy figuring out the hardware problems and understanding how that works. Have you thought about engineering degrees? There are Computer Engineering degrees that are a blend of Computer science and Electronic Engineering. But there are a variety of other Engineering degrees that you may be interested in. I would research engineering degrees to see which one fits best for you.

2. Some Computer Science degrees will allow you to add a focus or specialization in hardware. So you will still get the CS degree, which opens the door for a wide variety of well-paying jobs. But you would get the chance to take more classes that are hardware focused and less software classes. If this is the route you want to take, I would make sure to research schools that have these hardware-focused programs.

3. If you are wanting to stick to fixing computers and figuring out what is wrong with them, you might be interested in IT work. These jobs usually pay less than some of the other ones listed, but they also require less schooling. Many IT positions require only an Associate's degree or will hire people with no schooling that have a large amount of IT experience.

There are plenty of options for working with computers out there and I wish you the best of luck in finding the option that best suites you!
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Catherine’s Answer

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Hello,
There are many options to choose from if you are interested in computers; can start with a basic computer course that would review Hardware of Computer. I took a course where we had to take apart a Computer and put in back together again. It was a great experience.

If you like to solve problems, maybe a basic computer coding class would interest you. May be some at your school or can take an on-line course. There are also free on-line resources such as Codecademy: they have a free option to start you off. Can take a look at: https://www.codecademy.com/

Another option is to check out if colleges in the area offer a program for Computer Gaming. I have seen some local colleges that offer 1-2 year programs where you can get a certificate or 2 year degree in the Computer Gaming area. If really like it can continue for 2 more years for Computer Science Degree.

Best of Luck!
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Glen’s Answer

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Hello - there are so many out there. Computer Science, Computer Engineering, Management Information Systems, Information Technology, Network Engineering, etc. Depends if you want coding (MIS or CS/CE), business focused (MIS), technical (Networking), etc. There are so many jobs out there just ensure it matches your interest and research and job shadow to understand the opportunities out there. Look at current job listings and see what they require.

In the past as I've hired for companies, I looked for degrees and personality so a specific degree didn't matter. As long as you showed the aptitude - that is what matters. A specific degree may raise you to the top of the pile but doesn't necessarily mean you are the perfect fit. How you present yourself, etc - the total package, is what matters. Well round skills!!

Good luck!!
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Telmo’s Answer

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I've started that way with no degree. Unfortunately working culture these days will force you to get a degree that likely won't be relevant for that kind of work.

That said, i'd suggest computer science, and definitely to take the degree, not because you need it on that particular job, but because your mindset will change along the years. Right now you want to build computers, once you master that you will want something else.

Regardless of degree you take, the most important thing is that you keep yourself updated and follow what your hear says. In IT working 3-5 years in the same position is a long time, so try to keep moving as this is how you pick up new skills
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Prem Shankar’s Answer

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You can take Jatking hardware installation course.

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Drew’s Answer

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You should focus on a bachelor's in computer science at first, and then take coding classes online/take a master's program after that.

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Brandon’s Answer

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I never formally studied IT in college, but had a hobby/interest since I was a kid. I got my first IT job w/o a college degree but was able to successfully answer the questions in the interview and pass the written exams.

I am not knocking a formal education and would agree with the previous posts, however please don't limit yourself because soft skills and personality along with certifications can go a long way as well.

Brandon recommends the following next steps:

  • Look into Certifications: ACMT, A+, Network+, Linux+, Security+ and how they align with your career goals (these are to name a few, there are MANY out there!)
  • Read and practice as much as you can on your own to better understand the ins/outs of the hardware you will work with
  • There are trade/technical schools - but be wary when they make "promises" of jobs upon graduation.
  • Look into interning options to learn on the job.
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Karishma’s Answer

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I would advise looking into a computer science degree or something similar. These are now widely available and will make you attractive as a potential hire upon graduating.

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Jodi V.’s Answer

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Look for majors that include "systems" or "hardware" in the title
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