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What benefits are there to becoming a Behavior Specialist?

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I am a single mom and want to return to school for the first time since graduating high school in 2005. I want to become a behavior specialist specializing in autism.
#school #college #psychology #student #autism

Hi Aimee, what exactly do you mean by a "behavior specialist? " Do you mean a special education teacher working in the behavior unit with autistic students? I see your hashtag psychology, so I'm wondering if you have something else in mind but just aren't sure of the terminology. Perhaps if you could describe what you would like to do on a daily basis the question would be easier to answer. You are to be commended for your desire for further education and working with a population that is so rewarding and challenging! Kimberly O'Hare
I am referring to a behavior specialist in the form of working with the IDD community on a general basis, not necessarily school/teaching, to help figure out what kinds of things they like/dislike and what the easiest ways of communication are for them. Aimee M.
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Kimberly’s Answer

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Hi Aimee, Behavior Specialists in the traditional sense are individuals who are responsible for assessing students with behavior issues in the school setting. They work with teachers, parents, school psychologists and special education teachers to form a behavior plan for students and assess the effectiveness of BPs already in place. Behavior Specialists may recommend counseling, classes, or programs for students with behavioral issues. The benefits are endless. You are the person who can be a bridge to allow students to gain access to a fair and equal education that their behavior may be obstructing them from gaining. You are the expert who assists teachers and parents in understanding how the student can be most successful in overcoming their challenges with behavior.
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Ms.’s Answer

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Any time you work with kids, especially those with autism or another disability, it is especially challenging yet also very rewarding. As a behavior specialist, you will work directly with children and their families on managing, understanding, and changing behavior. I would strongly recommend getting some experience in the field especially if you do not have much exposure to kids with autism and/or other disabilities. In my area, there are organizations that hire "Behavioral Treatment Technicians" who only need a high school degree, and these folks are trained and then go into homes where they work with kids with autism. This allows you some professional experience to see if this is the route you'd like to go, and then as you continue with your education, your experience in the field may guide you into other areas that interest you as well.
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