Skip to main content
4 answers
4
Asked 526 views

What steps do I have to take to become an animator?

I like art and I doodle all the time, and I’ve always been told I should become an animator. What are some steps I can take to become one? #art #artist #animation

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

4

4 answers


0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Summer’s Answer

There are so many forms of drawing. Animators tell stories such as in children's books.
Animation, such as in Japanese Animé.
Every artist has a unique style of drawing, some are hyper realists, while others are cartoonists naturally and fine it difficult to draw realistically.
I am a realist who was in search of something more creative and then discovered surrealism, which came naturally for me once I went in that direction with my art.
Others become graphic artists, Special FX Artists for Film and Television.
It is a good idea to experiment with several styles to find the one that suits you the best in the direction you find you would like to go in. ~.~
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Daria’s Answer

Drawing is a great first step! Keep drawing, and especially drawing from life, because animation is all about observing the world around you and then translating through whatever animation medium you're using, and making it believable. There are also some great books out there, like the Animator's Survival Kit, that have a lot of wisdom and knowledge to share. Start simple with things like flip books or stop motion, and then build your way from there!
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Tevin’s Answer

Of course Drawing but also good storytelling. Think of yourself point of views and create a consistent theme base of your stories. As a storyteller myself, considering animations I imagine the unimaginable.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

John’s Answer

Daria is right. Drawing is essential, especially life drawing so you understand anatomy and human structure. Make videos and post them on the internet - not limited talking heads, but work that shows that you understand motion. This will put you head and shoulders above the crowd when you look for work. See how beautifully Simon's Cat flows, the realistic feel of the cat's action. That takes study. Your portfolio is essential. If you don't have access to a program like Harmony or Flash (Adobe Animate), you can download Blender for free. You need to use a Wacom tablet. Blender is a 3-D program that also has 2-D drawing functions in the 3-D world. With Blender, you can take your work all the way to a finished video that you can post. The tutorials are excellent and also free. When I was learning animation, we had to do everything on paper and film. You have wonderful advantages, but I did have the advantage of working with older people who worked at Disney, Famous Studio, and Terrytoons who taught me form and timing. Don't be too influenced by limited animation, which has its place in the economics of video production but is dialog driven. I recommend Timing for Animation by Harold Whitaker which he wrote a long time ago but is still essential to understand the feeling of making motion seem realistic.
0