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How do you deal with co-workers who are not getting their jobs done

#financial-planning #career #job #career-counseling #ImaWelder

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Melissa’s Answer

I am the kind of person if you don't tell me that I am doing something wrong, I will keep doing it wrong because I do not know that I am doing it wrong. I have that same perspective when someone is not doing what they should be. I take the approach that maybe they don't know. With that being said, talk to that person. Ask them if they realize they are supposed to be doing xyz...if they didn't know, then now they do. If they did know but just didn't do it, then I take the approach of I am reaching out to you first. If you still do not do what you are supposed to after I bring it to your attention, I will have to engage your supervisor.

If your work is dependent on the work they are not doing, you have 2 options. Do the work so your work is not impacted but let that person know if it happens again, you are taking it to the supervisor. Or take to supervisor with an audit trail of your communication to the person that is holding you up.
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Michelle’s Answer

Does their non-work slow production down? If so, then this reflects on the group or section as whole and you have the right to speak to your supervisor and discuss how you feel about this. Perhaps bringing the topic up at a meeting or request for training for everyone. Team building is good to get these issues out - especially if everyone's work depends the others as a whole for what is being done. Perhaps these people or person doesn't realize they are holding back the group or team/section. But communication is key in resolving the matter. Best of luck.
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Rebecca’s Answer

Thank you for your question. This is really a good question.
Different people have different characters and practices. Some people may have good planning and have their job done with steady progress. Some people would do it just before the deadline.
I believe effective communication and regular review is very important.
Firstly, we need to ensure everyone in the team are clear and understand the scope of the work assigned and the milestones & deadline.
Then, we can have regular review to check the milestones are met.
Having these process, if the milestones are missed, we can flag out the risk and bring the management attention.
This can help the team members working on the tasks as planned.
Hope this helps! Good Luck!
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Nakia’s Answer

If you work closely with this person, you could begin by giving them a bit of advice to help them perform better. If they are still not doing their job, you need to let your supervisor know, especially if it impacts your performance or results. If it doesn't get better, then you need to go that person's supervisor and have a talk with them.
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Piara’s Answer

Often times people are too intimidated to ask for help if they need it/embarrassed to ask a question if they do not know how to do something. I like to always offer a helping hand and provide guidance while also asking questions and promoting their efforts. Giving examples of how you are completing something or tips and sharing experiences also may be a more positive way to go about the situation.
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Katya’s Answer

Hi Diego, this could be a very frustrating environment to be on daily basis but you need to be patient and have a strategy to understand what is causing this co worker not to be productive and get the job done. It’s important to schedule of the floor time with this associate and have an open door policy conversation. The decrease in production could be caused by visual and non visual behaviors by you as an outsider. First, you as leader must show that you care and allow the associate to feel comfortable and be confident that this is a coaching session because you care and you want to see him/her progress.

Show past performances- is it something new or was this a trend for some time. I hope, that if it was a trend for some time-you took the time to help, motivate,support with resources to see improvement and you did not just leave an associate failing.

It could also be something personal that an associate is going through- as it’s not necessarily to get all the details- you need to provide all available HR resources that your company offers-but it’s ok to ask:”is we good at home?- this will allow you to see the reaction and maybe create a trust environment where an associate will share.

Also, an associate might feel that his contributions hasn’t been recognized or acknowledged-so the loss of motivation is a factor. So, review all performance- and when you have the conversation.coaching make sure you remind of all the great work and how much you appreciate it.

Maybe there is a tension going on on the team-an associate is feeling not involve don team projects, meeting, ets- find out what additional projects (competency) he/she would like to work on- this will create a sense or additional responsibility but also allow associate to bring themselves to work.

Review the company expectations, how the yearly review works, put together an individual development action plan-to an associate could see there is a potential for growth.

Always check on daily with your team-it’s important to know what they are working on.conduct weekly recaps-start with recognition and let the associate do self discovery what will they do different tomorrow.

Hope it helps
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Zach’s Answer

I think it's important to never forget to place yourself in someone else's shoes. You never truly know what is going on in another individuals life and sometimes it can be easy to get stuck in our own train of thought. Some of the best soft skills you can develop to make yourself a grant candidate is very high EQ (emotional intelligence). I would say do yourself a great favor and read as many psych books as you can in your life to really be able to emphasize, sympathize, and truly have meaningful discussions before jumping to conclusions.
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Tricia’s Answer

I would let your supervisor know. I would talk to your supervisor in private, and keep what you share factual (non-emotional), and outline you’re observations with specifics - dates/times and how it negatively impacted productivity (did it not allow you or someone else to get their job done, did it cause a customer to be unhappy with the service they are getting, etc.). You don’t know what is going on with your co-worker, but your supervisor should (there could be a legitimate reason they aren’t performing well - health, personal situation, etc.), and if you are bringing this to their attention they will appreciate you letting them look into the situation further to figure out how to best address. Let the supervisor address the situation. If you feel the supervisor is not taking your feedback seriously or you feel uncomfortable talking to your supervisor, I’d encourage you to talk to your human resource department. It can be frustrating when others aren’t doing their part.

Tricia recommends the following next steps:

Talk to your supervisor privately about the situation
Keep the conversation factual and include specific examples
Let the supervisor address the situation
Reach out to Human Resources if you’re uncomfortable talking to your supervisor or need help navigating how best to handle the situation
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Evan’s Answer

Diego,

Communication in all directions is incredibly important in this situation. The solution may be as simple as communicating with your colleague(s) to understand why he or she may be struggling to get their job. It could be that he or she has been given other tasks that you aren't aware of that are straining their bandwidth, that they were given different instructions than you, or that you've figured out a more efficient way to complete a task that you could share with them.

Communication with your manager is equally important. If you begin to notice a colleague who isn't pulling their weight and you are concerned that it will begin to negatively reflect on you, making sure your manager is aware of your concerns is entirely appropriate.

That being said, it's unavoidable that at some point in your career you will be working on a team or in an office with someone who simply doesn't share your work ethic. It's easy for that to effect your motivation, largely because it can give you the impression that you are working harder than your colleagues for the same compensation. In those situations I typically tell people two things.

First, keep in mind that you may not be aware of the conversations your colleague(s) have had with their managers. Those conversations are not typically held in public and there could be ongoing coaching and development targeted at that individual that you simply don't know about.

Second, long term career advancement is largely going to be a result of your productivity and effectiveness in your role. Never forget that you are working hard to put yourself in a position for advancement in the future. At the end of the day you may have worked twice as hard as your colleague for the same salary, but at the end of the year when you and your colleague are both up for a promotion or a raise, you are the one who will get it because you are the one who put in the extra effort.

Evan
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