23 answers
Asked Viewed 241 times Translate

What's one advice you would give to fresh grads?

Currently at my last year of collage education and would be thankful for any advice :) #college #education #career


+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you
26
100% of 24 Pros
100% of 1 Students

23 answers


Updated Translate

Jay’s Answer

Create a LinkedIn account and start networking. Most professionals will be happy to give advice, or provide an introduction if you reach out with a thoughtful and sincere message.

2
100% of 2 Pros
Updated Translate

Gurpreet’s Answer

As someone who graduated from college not so long ago, I was in your shoes recently. All of these answers are incredibly helpful and important to take into account but the one thing I wish I could go back and tell myself is that you shouldn't compare your post-grad success to that of others. The transition from college to the "real world" can be tough, I know it was for me, and it's easy to see your classmates and friends doing well in their careers while you may not be. It's important to remember that there is no time frame on success and we are all on different paths so comparing yourself to others doesn't make sense.

Congrats on being so close to graduation; I wish you all the best in your last year!!

2
100% of 1 Pros
Updated Translate

Christabelle’s Answer

Focus on doing a job where you'll be able to use a skill that you love and are relatively good at. My experience as a grad - I studied Arts (Media and Culture) aka what people called the bachelor of unemployment - I had no idea what kind of job I wanted. But I knew I loved writing. This led me into copywriting in my free time, which led me into an entry-level Marketing job, and I discovered that Marketing was a good industry for me because it's creative and connected to business revenue so salary-wise it's pretty good (as in, better than becoming a novelist or a journalist or an author). So I kept going in Marketing and never looked back! Basically - find what you love doing and find a way to do it, even if you're doing it for free outside of your regular job. This will lead to opportunities.

2
100% of 2 Pros
Updated Translate

Todd’s Answer

Since everyone's circumstances are different, and I don't have enough details about your situation, I'll respond with some general advice.

Just because you're finishing college doesn't mean you have to have all the answers. Some people have a clear path (career goals, job lined up, where they want to live, etc.) while others have no clue what to do next. The one thing both types of these people need to remember is the saying, "Man plans and God laughs". I know many people who graduated college with a degree in X and ended up doing Y. You don't always know where life and opportunities will take you. Enjoy the remaining time in school, follow your interests and try different things. You will make mistakes, but that's okay. Now is the time to do that. You learn a lot more from your losses than your wins and it will benefit you in the long run. As you experience life, learn and grow, you'll find the right path for you. It may be vastly different from where you currently see yourself going and when you get there you'll look back and see the curvy road you took along the way. As I tell my kids, life is a roller coaster -- lots of ups and downs, sometimes scary, sometimes thrilling. Enjoy the ride...

1
100% of 1 Pros
Updated Translate

Tiffany’s Answer

One thing that I did that was helpful was I started looking at jobs (part-time or volunteer) that were relevant to my degree and gave me great insight into the field. This can begin to build network contacts and give you some great leads for career opportunities when you graduate.

1
100% of 1 Pros
Updated Translate

Anita’s Answer

Be open to different opportunities - For Example if It is difficult to get into your particular field think about other avenues that you could pursue that may eventually lead you to the role that you want.
Always be prepared to pivot your career maybe your chosen field is not what you expected, be open and prepared to consider other options that you may not have thought about
Be curious ask lots of questions of prospective employers / people that work in a particular sector industry etc
Make sure you are fully informed before making a decision

0
Updated Translate

Sinead’s Answer

Hi Kwan!

First thing is to take a step back and have a think about some of the key things you enjoy doing day to day, next how does this relate to your degree and possible career opportunities?
Reaching out to people who have a similar background to you, and understanding their career path could be really useful as it will show you the different avenues available to you - you can do this via LinkedIn and most people are always willing to help.
Try and get involved in some internship programmes, they can be a massive eye opener in showing you again what you like and what you don't like - narrowing your search.
Don't be afraid to try new things and approach everything with an open mind - it can sometimes be the most unexpected career paths that ends up being the right fit!

Good luck.

0
Updated Translate

Angela’s Answer

Congratulations on finishing school! However, you are never done learning! Don't feel stressed to have to lineup the perfect job post school. Use this time to start from the ground up somewhere and start developing your skillset. You will learn quickly the things you like and don't like that will help you map out your career. I graduated with a Health promotion degree and am now in Software Sales and love it. Trust your gut and it will lead you on the right path.

0
Updated Translate

Tobias’s Answer

I think the biggest advice I have for a fresh graduate would be to not get overwhelmed by all of the choices you have. It can seem daunting to pick a path, especially if you have the option of taking several, when you aren’t sure exactly where they lead or if you’ll even enjoy them. However, the biggest thing I’ve learned that I want to share is to always be open to learning from others and seek growth. The decision you make now is important for your career, but I think what’s most important is being open to learning from those around you in the workplace and leaning on others to help you grow faster than you would on your own. Find someone you admire or look up to in the space and see if they’d be willing to mentor you. Ask for help when you need it and look for opportunities to challenge yourself by taking on a new project or leading an effort.

0
Updated Translate

Jenny’s Answer

I remember being a fresh grad. I was ambitious, had big plans and dreams, and at the same time confused, anxious and scared of the big world, and most of all- scared of making mistakes along the way.
As I grew older (and hopefully wiser:)), I have learnt that the best way to deal with transitioning from the world (or you can even call it a bubble) academia to the real world is just to pursue what makes you passionate, while being relaxed and just go with the flow and what the world brings along!
While it's important to have a clearly defined plan and goals to achieve, it is important to keep an open mind and welcome different other paths that present themselves to you, because life happens when you were busy planning other things so just enjoy the ride!

0
Updated Translate

Kim’s Answer

Get on top of money management!

"Wealth" is a matter of having more money than you need to meet your living expenses. Too many people tend to spend everything they make, and never get ahead. Use credit very cautiously. Avoid high interest cards. Track your EVERY expense, by category, so you can see where you can cut back. If your employer offers disability insurance, take it! It's easy to assume that nothing happens to young people, but believe me, it's not true! If your employer offers a 401 match, contribute the max that they will match, otherwise, you are leaving free money on the table. Do not buy a brand new car! There are better-priced good used ones out there. Don't buy the $100 warranty on a $500 item. Take care of your car and your HEALTH. They are what allow you to work!

Sometimes career opportunities come along that require taking a cut in pay, with opportunity to really earn good money in a couple of years. You need to be in a financial position to be able to afford to make that kind of move.

Congrats on sticking it out! Best of luck!
Kim

0
Updated Translate

Zach’s Answer

Don't necessarily feel the need to rush life. Everything will happen the way it's supposed to. DON'T compare yourself to others or try to place yourself in a timeline according to what others are doing. The best and only person you should be "competing" against is yourself. There will always be people that are more successful in some arena but don't let that distract you for the goals and accomplishments based off what you're capable of.

0
Updated Translate

Nick’s Answer

Find mentors! Whether it's a friend who graduated a few years older than you, someone from your alumni network, or simply someone you'd admire, building those relationships will provide a ton of value throughout your career.

0
Updated Translate

Abhishek’s Answer

Answer would vary depending on your background and future career path you want to be on.

However, generally, approach the market with open mind. Having open mindset might even help you discover new options in terms of career path. We all know, it's hard to define a set goal at the very start of career journey, hence trying different things and learning from it would be of great help. Gaining good industry experience was my priority as fresh grad.

0
Updated Translate

John’s Answer

Be open to opportunity. Don't limit yourself to one way of thinking, one "perfect" career path, etc. You will likely have many divergent experiences in your life and if you don't limit yourself, you will be able to enjoy and explore them!

0
Updated Translate

Nicolas’s Answer

Travel.

I didn't do it and I regret it. You'll have the next 30-40 years to work in whatever career path you choose. So take some time to yourself and go see the world.

0
Updated Translate

Terry’s Answer

Remember to stay positive and try not to get too discouraged when applying for jobs right after graduation. I must've applied to 50+ companies, phew! You will find your place!

BTW, Congrats on completing this accomplishment!

0
Updated Translate

Orla’s Answer

I would suggest starting your research for jobs as soon as you can in your final year. Not so much so that you can apply for them, but just so that you can get a feel for the type of roles that are available in your areas of interest and how each variation of that role differs. This will allow you to gain a deeper understanding of the industry.

Take advantage of speaking to your lecturers and past alumni, where you get the chance, whilst you are in college. These are people that have gone through what you are going through now and have most likely helped others like you.

Remain open-minded when applying for roles. From my own experience, I did not imagine in my final year of college that I would be in the role I am in now. You never know where doors will open for you, explore every opportunity that presents itself.

0
Updated Translate

Clay’s Answer

Time in the number one premium in life! If you dedicate time to something, hopefully, that thing is something that you like doing. If not, stop!

0
Updated Translate

Henry’s Answer

Hi Kwan,

Enjoy your last year! You will never see some of the people you know again.

Careerwise, choose something you like reasonably well, but also try to gain new experiences and wear many hats. This will help you decide what you like and don't like, and the earlier you do this the better. You aren't locked into your career so don't feel pressure to go down a single path.

0
Updated Translate

Soo Ling’s Answer

My one advice is - what you're doing now isn't what you might be doing in 3, 5 or 10 years. Don't be afraid to take the opportunities, learn as much as you can and build up your experience.

I graduated university with a degree in Health Science, my first job was in a software distributor - worlds apart from each other. A decade on and I'm happily working in a tech company which I hadn't considered when I was still in school. So take a chance and don't stress too much - also good luck!

0
Updated Translate

Patricia’s Answer

If you are in your last year of college, get an internship or apprenticeship in the field of your choice. Some companies will offer you employment when you graduate. Even if they do not make a job offer, you will have gotten invaluable experience in your field of interest. Companies value experience highly because you are "a step up" when they hire you...you have a sense of what is expected and may require less training. Also, making the effort to gain experience, shows that you have a great interest in the career field you have chosen... that you really are interested in this field and are, therefore, more likely to remain in that field or company when hired. Getting experience in your career field will prepare you in many ways for your life after college.

0
Updated Translate

Lauren’s Answer

What a great question! First - congrats on your last year of college! That's amazing. My advice is to say yes. To all kinds of opportunities. What you end up doing long term for a career could be entirely different from where you start, and gaining new and different experiences is really important. Also - budget! It's so easy to go into working life and let things get out of control quickly. Make an effort to pay attention to your finances.

0