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If I'm a little worried about how difficult college will be after my public school education, should I take courses over the summer before college at a community college to prepare more?

I'm in high school hoping to go into either a health or law profession after college. I am currently undecided about which university I want to go to and what my major will be. #college #school


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Michael’s Answer

Should you take college courses over the summer while deciding which school to attend. I would defiantly recommend meeting with an college admin. The reason for this would be to, one make sure that all the classes that you decide to take transfer and two to make sure that you are taking the correct classes that you can knock out before college.

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Ashley’s Answer

This is a great question. I think it takes knowing what you may major in to understand if you will need more preparation. Community Colleges helps because it's normally smaller classes but you would want to take classes that will go towards your major/degree so you're not wasting time. Also knowing what your major is will help you understand what classes are required so you can prepare for areas of study that you may not be great in.

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Estelle’s Answer

That’s a great question! I went to public school, but I also took classes at a community college before starting college. The classes are usually smaller and there’s more of an emphasis on making sure that everyone succeeds. I think that this would be a great idea especially if you want to knock out some of your harder classes. This is a great idea, and I wish you the best of luck!

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Richard’s Answer

Transitioning from any high school to college would be a challenge. As long as you developed good study habits in high school you should do well.

There are advantages to taking summer classes:
1) can help lighten your load during the school year so you can concentrate on a smaller number of classes thus improving your grades and comprehension of the subject.
2) can help keep you on track for graduating on time. This is particularly important if you change your major during school and have to take extra courses.

However disadvantages include:
1) may increase the cost of college. Some universities charge the same price per semester regardless of whether you take a full course load. If your school does this, you may be paying extra for the summer classes.
2) summer is also a good time to explore other opportunities such as research or finding an internship in your field of study.

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Yume’s Answer

Hi Harry! I also went to public school prior to going to university, but I also decided to go to community college in order to transfer into a university. It is great that you are thinking of ways to already prepare yourself! Going to university after high school can be a huge adjustment not just how rigorous the education is, but, depending on where you go, it will be a huge life adjustment. I think it is great idea to take some classes at a community college, especially if you are unsure about what major you would like to go into. However, the environment at community colleges differ greatly than from universities. Community college is great in that it's a smaller class size so you get to ask the professor more questions and you have a more personal connection with your peers. Sometimes in universities, you will be placed in huge class sizes of about 300 or 400 people, making it harder to ask questions during class (but office hours are hugely encouraged!). So although taking a class in community college may be great in exposing yourself to the rigor of the material you choose, the environment is not necessarily the same. Best of luck to you!

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Joe’s Answer

Come Come young man have a little faith in yourself. If you're asking about college after high school that means you care about learning. Did you prepare well for school so far by doing your work, being where you needed to be, participating? One of the main differences you're going to encounter is you, your family, and any advisers will have to make the effort to pay for school. The same goes for classes, you're not going to be handed a roster but will need to select your courses. Generally, there are required core classes such as your English 101 which are selected for you but you will have to pick the time to take the class and how it will fit in with all of your other classes. Dude that's just a matter of thought and effort which you can view as an opportunity to be creating your own destiny.
If you're able to go away to school you have to get yourself up and make it to those classes. For the most part you've been doing that for years. My advice to you is keep up your good habits and associate mostly with fellow students that are accomplishing what you envision for yourself. Know or learn when to turn off a good time and you'll be alright. Even if you're attending school while living at home your level of discipline will be ratcheted up. All the better for you, right?
Don't be sitting by yourself when you encounter problems you may not be able to figure out!!! Go out and find help. Your life will be moving faster. You made a transition once from elementary to high school and you will do the same with college should you decide to attend. If you want to do something over the summer think about connecting with a counselor and or academic adviser. They are there to help and support you navigate through college.
I envy you as you entering an exciting time in your life. You're not only matriculating into higher education something you probably were taught about ever since you were a little child but your going through a rites of passage from childhood into adulthood. The world is going to open up at least a little more for you which means it's going to look like you can do this, that, and everything: keep your wits about you. If you are asking these questions it's a sign you care and were raised right.
College is a your philosophical years of getting to know yourself. I suggest paying attention to the studies that really light a fire in you that you can be working on for hours and it seems like only a few minutes passed because you love what you're doing. Next pay attention to what interests you. Well I probably bored you enough so I wish you well and by the way I started out at community college too to keep the costs down. I was acting out of fear and uncertainty like most people. You are great you just don't know it yet!

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Ayanna’s Answer

There are many students who feel unprepared or just want to make sure they are ready for college classes. If I were in your shoes, I would strategically use the summer before college or year after high school to take classes to strengthen any areas that you think are your weakest. There a few things you can do:

If your writing is weak definitely take a summer essay writing or research paper class. You can be assured that most college classes will involve writing papers so make sure you have a really good foundation. Look at your local community college or check any community college online.

If you will be taking a higher-level math class but need to refresh your skills, consider checking out websites like Khan Academy, Edx.org, or study.com for a refresher course.

Or let's say you don't feel like you've mastered note-taking and study prep then I would peruse Youtube for some great videos. Also check out my Pinterest boards: College Success: https://www.pinterest.com/ayannaluv/college-success/more_ideas/?ideas_referrer=1
and Art of Notetaking: https://www.pinterest.com/ayannaluv/art-of-notetaking-and-test-prep/

You don't have to know everything before you enter college but if you have certain weak areas you should put in the time to strengthen them and then you won't have to worry about whether you can do the work or not. And remember campuses usually have tutors that can help if you find yourself stuck in any subject. The goal is to enter having as much confidence as possible! Good luck--you got this!


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Hanleigh’s Answer

Hi! I think it is a great idea to take some community college courses prior to attending a university if you are concerned about the level of difficulty. Community college courses are generally smaller and may reflect, so it may be a better transition into your college career. However, I do not think it is necessary. I have personally came from a public school system, and I believe the key to being successful as a college student, whether from public or private school education, is your level of motivation to do well and learn the material. I also think it is important not to overwhelm yourself during college. Do not overload yourself with too many courses at a time, and be mindful of your schedule that includes work outside school (work, internships, campus organizations, etc.)

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