6 answers
Asked Viewed 166 times Translate

Do you need a lot experience to be a electrical engineerer


+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you
5
100% of 3 Pros

6 answers


Updated Translate

John’s Answer

The experience you need to be any type of engineer, including electrical, comes fundamentally in two parts: education and on-the-job experience.

An undergraduate program to get a bachelor's degree typically takes four years. A master's degree is an additional one to two years, dependent on the program and field. Your initial years of employment is where you put all this learning together to be able to practically apply your knowledge to solving real world problems. You should never "stop learning". Your value as an engineer and likely your interest in the field is dependent on this continued learning process, which continues through your whole career.

1
100% of 1 Pros
Updated Translate

Bill’s Answer

Hi Jean, I am an Electrical Engineer (EE) by training, although now I am a technical program manager in a large engineering organization.
I agree with both John and Daryl’s answers about getting a good education, the importance of on-the-job training, and to never stop learning.
I’d like to add that I highly recommend that you enroll in a Co-op or intern program at the university that you are attending (or plan to attend). The work experience that you gain while in school is invaluable to help you decide what specific EE areas that you do/do not want to pursue in your career. Additionally, the work experience gives you an advantage over someone who does not have that experience as you search for that career coming out of college.

0
Updated Translate

Daryl’s Answer

Hi Jean,

I'm an electrical engineer so happy to give my perspective on your question.

In general any engineering path starts with education, usually through a 4 years bachelor degree. However once you have that degree there are varying levels of engineering you can do based on your experience.

Generally companies will hire new grads/interns that have completed their degree but have little to no other experience. You will then do a lot of learning on the job.
There is then generally a point where you become an "engineer-in-training" where you are expected to have some experience 2-3 years and will be given more responsibility.
Finally you get to the point where you become a "professional engineer" at this point you are generally licensed by an oversight board and have to have demonstrated significant experience in your field of expertise.

So in conclusion, becoming a new engineer does not require much experience, but does generally require education. To then move up in the career path you will need to increase your experience.

-Daryl

0
Updated Translate

John’s Answer

The experience you need to be any type of engineer, including electrical, comes fundamentally in two parts: education and on-the-job experience.

An undergraduate program to get a bachelor's degree typically takes four years. A master's degree is an additional one to two years, dependent on the program and field. Your initial years of employment is where you put all this learning together to be able to practically apply your knowledge to solving real world problems. You should never "stop learning". Your value as an engineer and likely your interest in the field is dependent on this continued learning process, which continues through your whole career.

0
Updated Translate

Steve’s Answer

Jean,
Great question! You will gain experience by doing and by experimenting. No one is born with experience, you need to go out and obtain that whether it's a part time job, research assistant, internship, etc. before getting that first professional engineering job. And don't forget, your first job doesn't have to define your entire career. It's OK (and I'd say recommended) to try different industries. You'll find almost all basic engineering disciplines (mechanical, electrical, software, etc.) in any major industry.

Steve

0
Updated Translate

Steve’s Answer

Jean,
Great question! You will gain experience by doing and by experimenting. No one is born with experience, you need to go out and obtain that whether it's a part time job, research assistant, internship, etc. before getting that first professional engineering job. And don't forget, your first job doesn't have to define your entire career. It's OK (and I'd say recommended) to try different industries. You'll find almost all basic engineering disciplines (mechanical, electrical, software, etc.) in any major industry.

Steve

0