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What industry areas of Biomedical Engineering are the best for recent college graduates hoping to pursue a lifelong career in biomedical product engineering?

I am hoping to pursue a career in Biomedical Engineering. Since this field is so broad and full of various areas of concentration, I want to know what areas professionals think are the best to begin with. What areas will help those new to industry narrow down their interests and applicable skill set? For reference, I have a concentration in electrical engineering.

#biomedical-engineering #biomed #biotechnology #electrical-engineering #engineering #engineering-industry #first-job


I would be glad to help you on your venture. I have been in Radiology as a Field Service Engineer since 1982. I have worked on all modalities in radiology. Michael Herz, CBET-R

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28 answers


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Natalya’s Answer

I have Master degree s in Biomedical Engineering and Electro-Mechanical engineering, and have been working in medical device companies for over 20 years. I worked in companies that make mechanical devices, and my feel is that that particular part of the industry is on decline, electrical and software are on the raise. Tissue engineering is also on the rise, so is stem cell research.


Companies rarely look specifically for bioengineers, so I would go for electrical engineering or mechanical engineering (or electrical major, mechanical minor) and take at least some software classes. Also learn SolidWorks if you can - most engineering jobs have it as a requirement.


One specialty that is not very glamorous but present in every medical device company is Quality Engineering. Quality Engineers probably have the easiest time finding jobs in Medical Device industry, as they could move between different types of companies. Anyone with "engineering" in their degree could become a Quality Engineer.


Helpful comment Paul Alabi

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Victoria’s Answer

Hi Kristen.


I hope I can give you as full of an answer as possible. I graduated from Drexel with a Bachelor's in Biomedical Engineering last year. My concentration was electrical based in neuroengineering. I went through a co-op program so I had 3 chances in addition to the 2 research opportunities I pursued to yield an idea of what to pursue in Biomedical Engineering. After all of those experiences, I actually found I wanted to be something different (STEAM education tech/toys) but this is what I will say in brief.


If you want to have a fulfilling career and stay in the industry, the best way is to do a Bachelor's in one of the established engineering disciplines: Electrical, Mechanical, Computer Science or ensure that you do a dual degree in Biomedical and one of the established engineering disciplines. If you work in industry, people are greatly confused by what a Biomedical Engineer is even though I believe the major has been around since the 80s. Here's the thing though: Biomedical Engineers are extremely resourceful and I never regret my undergraduate experience. If you're resourceful, creative, and a bit lucky, the Bachelor's is a great route. Getting a master's or PhD and specializing further does help.


As to which area to start? Honestly, everyone here is going to tell you something different. I started as Biomaterials and worked around in different engineering disciplines which is my personal recommendation to understand what you like the most and learn the most. I ended up in neuroengineering and I program now mostly. If you opt to do a bunch of different areas, you also start to gain different perspectives from each, and, for the most part, the purpose of a Biomedical Engineer is to have a diverse set of knowledge. However, if you want to start out, I would start with computer science because if you realize you want to stem into other fields such as biomaterials or neuroengineering then you will have a quite valuable skill set especially for either automation or data analysis that either a company or research facility will want in addition to what you can learn on your own from textbooks or research papers.


Good luck with your path!

Tori S.

Victoria recommends the following next steps:

Start out with research or coop/internship in Computer Science
Learn who you are from it. What do you like and what don't you like?
Do what you like! Or repeat with a different discipline and find the area that you really like.

This is so true. I have a BS in biomedical engineering and often people don’t know what it is! luckily I had a concentration in electrical engineering so I always preface myself as a biomedical and electrical engineer which I have found is the best way to market myself in my preferred field (biotechnology). This is great advice though, dual majoring with a more pinpointed form of engineering will help a lot upon graduating. Good answer! Joshua Powers

Thank you this is helpful Otto W.

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Nishat’s Answer

Biomedical instrumentation and biomaterials are the best areas of biomedical engineering to pursue a long-term career in biomedical products.


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LP’s Answer

I'd say that artificial intelligence and metadata analysis is becoming more and more present in healthcare and a lot of companies emerge from that in Montreal.

However, there will always be old-fashioned surgical instruments, monitors, metallic implants, machines and various hardware used in hospitals so being able to design such hardware using your skills is going to get you far enough without narrowing down your expertise too much. For example, knowing how to do CAD, knowing how things are built, knowing how to code or knowing how to design electrical systems can be useful in many industries and certainly for designing medical devices. Such skills will always be needed.

A general knowledge on the regulatory requirements and the environment in which medical devices are used, but also knowledge on quality standards is already a very good start because it applies everywhere.

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ÖZGÜR’s Answer

I hope to give my best advice to you kristen. So you should start to concanrate about human health,anatomy,biology etc. this way shows you how to find their problem to figure out and understading them. my experiences taught me 'first step is understanding how to work' and 'how can I help'. If i help about this questions, i will be happy.

PS: sorry about my english.


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abdul jaleel’s Answer

<span style="color: rgb(93, 103, 106);">Biomedical instrumentation and biomaterials are the best areas of biomedical engineering to pursue a long-term career in biomedical products</span>


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Muath’s Answer

You can focus on lab equipments which is needed in hospitals and private lab companies, the demands on this equipments are very high and need continues service.
Imaging and non imaging systems are just available in hospitals which make you in small circuit with professional people who already don't share that much of experience.
Dental clinic are very good area too but you need to have many types of skills.

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Britt’s Answer

Hi Kristen! There are very good recommendations given by the previous responses so I will try not to overlap them...


One of the big areas of healthcare that is relatively new compared to others is the sensors field. I've seen electrical engineers find success the bio-sensors field. You could find jobs in both the product development or the manufacturing areas of the industry.


Another area that is growing exponentially right now is the wearable sensors technologies. This could be anything from the common heart rate monitors and pedometers you see to implantable devices such as the cardioMEMS. There are new devices coming out with this technology every year! Hope this helps!




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Kamaleldin’s Answer

field service engineer


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PAUL’s Answer

When you think Biomedical, Think hospital Equipment ...

there are hundreds of pieces of equipment to be cared for within Biomed, many fall under general biomed : defibrillators, IV

pumps, blood pressure machines etc. But there are many areas of specialty like dialysis Machines, radiology scanners ( ct, mri, pet, ultrasound ) or even the many machines used in surgical areas. Usually a new Biomed joins a hospital as a Biomed 1 and after showing promise working on general biomedical equipment they might be selected to be sent off to school for a specialty area.

i hope this helps


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ÖZGÜR’s Answer

I hope to give my best advice to you kristen. So you should start to concanrate about human health,anatomy,biology etc. this way shows you how to find their problem to figure out and understading them. my experiences taught me 'first step is understanding how to work' and 'how can I help'. If i help about this questions, i will be happy.

PS: sorry about my english.


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Anila’s Answer

I concentrated in Neural Engineering which is basically application of electrical engineering knowledge to Neuroscience. My PhD research was related to suppression of in-vitro epileptic seizure like activity in rat's brain using electrical stimulation. Study of neurons and how they transmit data is a wonderful application of your electrical engineering education.


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Prashant’s Answer

I would like to work in field so place is not important, however my goal is to learn new things. Therefore I will choose company.

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Prashant’s Answer

I would like to work in field so place is not important, however my goal is to learn new things. Therefore I will choose company.

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Prashant’s Answer

I would like to work in field so place is not important, however my goal is to learn new things. Therefore I will choose company.

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Ahmad’s Answer

instrumental analysis and Maintenance in general ..Manufacturing and developing equipment


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Mohd’s Answer

Biomedical instrumentation and equipment are the best areas of biomedical engineering to pursue a long-term career in biomedical products, in the field of new era...


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Forough’s Answer

Biosensors for disease detection, medical image analysis and instrumentation, medical device technician, designing and fabricating implants (artificial heart, vascular grafts, ventricular assist device, artificial limbs, etc)


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Zachary’s Answer

Hospitals or working for companies that design the medical devices.


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visalakshi’s Answer

bioinstumentation, biomaterials, biomechanics, medical devices, manufacturing devices

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Deborah Yayra’s Answer

I have a Bachelor's degree in Biomedical Engineering. With your major in Electrical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation would be a good choice for you. Almost all medical devices come with electronic components. these electronic boards or components have the same principle you learn in Electrical Engineering, hence you would find your electrical engineering skills more useful in Biomedical Instrumentation.

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SYED DANISH’s Answer

Critical care is my strongest area of work


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Derrick’s Answer

Product Development


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Eman’s Answer

I have a bachelor degree in biomedical engineering and I took three internships and one job related to my major.

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Lee’s Answer

Hi Kristin! I'm happy that you've found such interest and enjoyment in your career path. I agree with you that healthcare is by far the most fulfilling career for me, and I've tried a few. Great question too! I kind of backed my way in to my position as a Biomedical engineer and supervisor. So I will kind of reverse engineer my path for you. I have an associate's degree in computer information systems, a bachelor's in management information systems. My first career job was as a PACS administrator in an Imaging Center. Then I decided to apply for Radiation Technology school and was accepted! BUT, I declined and stuck with the software side of things. Then I tried a few other fields - hardware, accounting software, bartending!(haha) - but always longed to be back in healthcare. I landed a job with GE healthcare as a software support engineer but wanted to be in the field not an office. So then I went to a medical supply company and learned sales, service and delivery of all their products. Then finally, I found Biomedical engineering. It kind of brings it all together don't ya think. So to answer your question, stick with what you know and what you love and enjoy. Familiarize yourself with the products you'll be working with and learn what you can when you can. I loved digital imaging myself, so get some experience doing what you like, if possible. It uses skills from all areas, but I think the most important one is actually people skills. You can learn or be taught how to fix any medical device, but at the end of the day it's those interactions with your coworkers, the vendors, the clinical staff, and even the patients, that is going to bring the most satisfaction to you and your peers. I hope this helps! Sorry if it wasn't direct or technical enough for this platform, but it's my first time to comment so.forgive me! I wish you all the best!

Lee Crabb

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Lama’s Answer

Bioinstrumention and medical imaging are the best fields.

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Rohail Aslam’s Answer

Hi,

First of all you must figure out your interest according your expertise, let me elaborate the category of BME

There are Four categories of Biomedical Engineering service/sales field

1, Medical Imaging which leads you towards the imaging equipment

Like CT, MRI, Dexa, Flouroscopy, Angiography, Ultrasound machine, Cobalt60, Gamma Cameras, the mentioned modalities which will explore you in radiology or medical imaging,

2, Critical Care

Like All ICU, CCU, Operating Room and Hospital equipment including Life Saving and Emergency equipment,

3, Laboratory equipment, such as Centrifuges, Urine analyzer, chemistry analyzer, bio safety cabinets, fume hoods, TB labs, Stem cell Lab, biotechnology lab, histo pathology lab, Lab Automation, microbiology and molecular lab, all labs contain their specific equipment and you can go for lab depend on your interest,

4, Dentistry, dental side is also an interesting field for Biomedical Engineers,

And other fields are Hospital Management, equipment inventory management, designing and building according to the size and feasibility of equipment,

CSSD, Biomedical Engineer can also be the part of Incinerator and sterilization process on hospital, and Reverse Osmosis and De ionization of water for lab, as well as hospital too,

Biomedical Engineer can serve as a market leader in field of Sales and Marketing engineer for manufacturer and distributor firms,

At the end, i tried my best to convey you actual image of Biomedical Engineer, hope you will like and appreciate

Thanks

Kind Regards!


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Shadi’s Answer

biomedical is a bog field that you have to be creative and in same time to learn as much as you can and have experience


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