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What industry areas of Biomedical Engineering are the best for recent college graduates hoping to pursue a lifelong career in biomedical product engineering?

I am hoping to pursue a career in Biomedical Engineering. Since this field is so broad and full of various areas of concentration, I want to know what areas professionals think are the best to begin with. What areas will help those new to industry narrow down their interests and applicable skill set? For reference, I have a concentration in electrical engineering.

#biomedical-engineering #biomed #biotechnology #electrical-engineering #engineering #engineering-industry #first-job

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Natalya’s Answer

I have Master degree s in Biomedical Engineering and Electro-Mechanical engineering, and have been working in medical device companies for over 20 years. I worked in companies that make mechanical devices, and my feel is that that particular part of the industry is on decline, electrical and software are on the raise. Tissue engineering is also on the rise, so is stem cell research.


Companies rarely look specifically for bioengineers, so I would go for electrical engineering or mechanical engineering (or electrical major, mechanical minor) and take at least some software classes. Also learn SolidWorks if you can - most engineering jobs have it as a requirement.


One specialty that is not very glamorous but present in every medical device company is Quality Engineering. Quality Engineers probably have the easiest time finding jobs in Medical Device industry, as they could move between different types of companies. Anyone with "engineering" in their degree could become a Quality Engineer.

Thank you comment icon Helpful comment Paul Alabi
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Victoria’s Answer

Hi Kristen.


I hope I can give you as full of an answer as possible. I graduated from Drexel with a Bachelor's in Biomedical Engineering last year. My concentration was electrical based in neuroengineering. I went through a co-op program so I had 3 chances in addition to the 2 research opportunities I pursued to yield an idea of what to pursue in Biomedical Engineering. After all of those experiences, I actually found I wanted to be something different (STEAM education tech/toys) but this is what I will say in brief.


If you want to have a fulfilling career and stay in the industry, the best way is to do a Bachelor's in one of the established engineering disciplines: Electrical, Mechanical, Computer Science or ensure that you do a dual degree in Biomedical and one of the established engineering disciplines. If you work in industry, people are greatly confused by what a Biomedical Engineer is even though I believe the major has been around since the 80s. Here's the thing though: Biomedical Engineers are extremely resourceful and I never regret my undergraduate experience. If you're resourceful, creative, and a bit lucky, the Bachelor's is a great route. Getting a master's or PhD and specializing further does help.


As to which area to start? Honestly, everyone here is going to tell you something different. I started as Biomaterials and worked around in different engineering disciplines which is my personal recommendation to understand what you like the most and learn the most. I ended up in neuroengineering and I program now mostly. If you opt to do a bunch of different areas, you also start to gain different perspectives from each, and, for the most part, the purpose of a Biomedical Engineer is to have a diverse set of knowledge. However, if you want to start out, I would start with computer science because if you realize you want to stem into other fields such as biomaterials or neuroengineering then you will have a quite valuable skill set especially for either automation or data analysis that either a company or research facility will want in addition to what you can learn on your own from textbooks or research papers.


Good luck with your path!

Tori S.

Victoria recommends the following next steps:

Start out with research or coop/internship in Computer Science
Learn who you are from it. What do you like and what don't you like?
Do what you like! Or repeat with a different discipline and find the area that you really like.
Thank you comment icon This is so true. I have a BS in biomedical engineering and often people don’t know what it is! luckily I had a concentration in electrical engineering so I always preface myself as a biomedical and electrical engineer which I have found is the best way to market myself in my preferred field (biotechnology). This is great advice though, dual majoring with a more pinpointed form of engineering will help a lot upon graduating. Good answer! Joshua Powers
Thank you comment icon Thank you this is helpful Otto
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Nishat’s Answer

Biomedical instrumentation and biomaterials are the best areas of biomedical engineering to pursue a long-term career in biomedical products.

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PAUL’s Answer

When you think Biomedical, Think hospital Equipment ...

there are hundreds of pieces of equipment to be cared for within Biomed, many fall under general biomed : defibrillators, IV

pumps, blood pressure machines etc. But there are many areas of specialty like dialysis Machines, radiology scanners ( ct, mri, pet, ultrasound ) or even the many machines used in surgical areas. Usually a new Biomed joins a hospital as a Biomed 1 and after showing promise working on general biomedical equipment they might be selected to be sent off to school for a specialty area.

i hope this helps

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Lama’s Answer

Bioinstrumentation and medical imaging are the best fields.
Thank you comment icon Can you explain why you think these are the best? Gurpreet Lally, Admin
Thank you comment icon Bioinstrumentation and medical imaging are best for many reasons: -Bioinstrumentation are used for diagnosis, treatment of disease, and vaccine research for example Oxford university and astrazenca used Thermofisher instrumentation for vaccine research. - Imaging devices are also play a vital role for diagnosis and cancer treatment; using linacs and gamma knife helped to treat cancer. - Imaging devices such as SPECT CT has the potential to help improve the clinical outcome of pancreas transplant. - Imaging devices are used for Artificial organs research. - Working in these fields will rich you with knowledge and unique skills. - Highest salary. Lama Ismail
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Eman’s Answer

I have a bachelor degree in biomedical engineering and I took three internships and one job related to my major.
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Eliya Mehdi’s Answer

Hi Kristin.
It all depends upon the company. Choice of the company makes your career or if you find the excellent boss, then it is very helpful for your career growth. I worked in Hospital and get lots of good opportunities so I think you should start your career from the Radiology side.It's a vast field and underdeveloped.If you need any help you can contact me through LinkedIn.

I wish you all the best,

Regards

Syed Eliya
Manager Biomedical
https://www.linkedin.com/in/eliya-mehdi-syed-706a4889/
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Deborah Yayra’s Answer

I have a Bachelor's degree in Biomedical Engineering. With your major in Electrical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation would be a good choice for you. Almost all medical devices come with electronic components. these electronic boards or components have the same principle you learn in Electrical Engineering, hence you would find your electrical engineering skills more useful in Biomedical Instrumentation.
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ÖZGÜR’s Answer

I hope to give my best advice to you kristen. So you should start to concanrate about human health,anatomy,biology etc. this way shows you how to find their problem to figure out and understading them. my experiences taught me 'first step is understanding how to work' and 'how can I help'. If i help about this questions, i will be happy.

PS: sorry about my english.

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Shadi’s Answer

biomedical is a bog field that you have to be creative and in same time to learn as much as you can and have experience

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Derrick’s Answer

Product Development

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Ahmad’s Answer

instrumental analysis and Maintenance in general ..Manufacturing and developing equipment

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oscar’s Answer

in my Opinion, you should start working in a hospital or in a company who can see a lot of kind of medical equipment. first of all you need to learn how every equip works. after that you can choose what way you want to follow. sorry for my english, Im from Panama, My first language is spanish
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SYED DANISH’s Answer

Critical care is my strongest area of work

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Racha’s Answer

Dear Biomedical Engineering student everywhere,
During the past 23 years, I experienced two different paths,
first one, after graduating I was aiming to continue as a lecturer & Instructor in my college where I graduated, so I continued an extra year (Diploma in Biomedical Engineering), then I finished another 3 years (Master of Science in Biomedical Engineering), then I had my Ph.D degree.
I worked in the education field from 1997 till 2012, and that was a great experience, since I was upgrading all my skills in researching and teaching skills.
I helped in teaching students and supervising lots of graduation projects. Dealing and sharing knowledge with the undergraduates is amazing, they have innovative ideas, and passion to learn and achieve more.
I gained a lot in this path, learned more about all concepts of biomedical engineering field, and had a great time while teaching. I encourage you to continue higher studies and work in the education field if you have enough patience to learn, research and teach.

Second path, I had an opportunity in a management role in a (Poly Clinic Medical Center/One Day Surgery Hospital), I worked for 7 years as a general manager, while all protocols of customer service, marketing, operation, purchasing and all details regarding machines and its maintenance were required to be under my supervision , it was a different world from teaching, but it was full of challenges. I learned by practice all aspects of management, and in the same time I achieved a lot in the managerial role.
At this stage I was hoping that if I have enough time to take either a Master degree in Healthcare management or MBA (Master in Business Administration), either one would helped more to lead and understand the healthcare business, so from my previous experience I encourage you to take Master degree in Biomedical Engineering, even if you do not want to work in the university, and then apply for Master in Healthcare management or MBA, this will benefit you to work in higher positions in hospitals, and in the same time you are fully responsible of all machines and its operation, in the end you are a biomedical engineer, you are the core of any hospital like the doctor and the nurse, you are one third of the hospital, and if you have an MBA or a master in healthcare management you will be more than half of the hospital, it worth it!
All the best for all of you
Thank you comment icon a bachelors in BME alone is worthless trash. I have one and I have been unemployed ever since I graduated. BME shouldn't even exist on that level. nobody should do a bachelors in BME, I wish I was dead instead of a Biomedical engineer. anony mouse
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Britt’s Answer

Hi Kristen! There are very good recommendations given by the previous responses so I will try not to overlap them...


One of the big areas of healthcare that is relatively new compared to others is the sensors field. I've seen electrical engineers find success the bio-sensors field. You could find jobs in both the product development or the manufacturing areas of the industry.


Another area that is growing exponentially right now is the wearable sensors technologies. This could be anything from the common heart rate monitors and pedometers you see to implantable devices such as the cardioMEMS. There are new devices coming out with this technology every year! Hope this helps!



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