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What should I major in to become a neonatal nurse?

#nursing #neonatal

Thank you comment icon Hi Jessica, Both previous comments are accurate, however, realistically you will set yourself up for success by taking biology, chemistry, psychology and similar classes in college. You could major in any one of those subjects or design a health sciences contract major with the help of your college advisor. Neonatology is a sub specialty that is competitive to get into, so the better you do in science classes, the greater your access to that subspecialty will be. Marybeth Mitts

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Ram’s Answer

Though I do not have much expertise in the sciences, from personal experience I know that major is not everything. It is also important to gain experience and connections in the industry you hope to go to. Thus, you can still achieve the job you want while pursuing a different major and exploring other interests.
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Heather’s Answer

I worked as a neonatal nurse for several years. I would definitely recommend getting your Bachelor's degree in nursing. Most Neonatal units are considered ICUs (Intensive Care Units) and you would be more likely to be hired with a BSN (Bachelor of Science in Nursing). Hope this is helpful!
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Bonnie’s Answer

First...you have to be a registered nurse. Major in Nursing with a Bachelors of Science degree. Nursing advisors in school and nurse managers on neonatal units can advise you as to the work experience needed to begin practice on the neonatal unit. You can consider future education as an Advanced Practice Nurse specializing in Neonatology.
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Willington’s Answer

What I have learned about people and their careers is that it doesn't matter much what you've majored in college. What is more important is getting real-world experience alongside professionals who you would be interested in working in the same role. It is more important that whatever knowledge you gain from an undergrad, you use that to leverage yourself and use it as a competitive advantage.
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