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What kind of scholarships do i have to look for considering im American but living in Nepal?

I have little to no idea about scholarship processes and other details that i might require when i apply to colleges in US. I will be giving my SATs. How do i go about shortlisting colleges or looking for scholarships? i was born in new york. What kind of differences will there be between my friends who will be international students and me, an American? Please help. With schools closed im very lost :(
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Alison’s Answer

Hi Rach,
It is possible to find the right university for you and scholarships when living abroad, but it will take some extra work. In all honesty, my first suggestion is to do some googling. See what available scholarships you can find for students in your situation. For narrowing down colleges, start with big, broad searches (things like “colleges for political science” or “best colleges on the west coast” or “small rural colleges” or whatever versions of those you’re interested in). Once you’ve done a little bit of preliminary research, you can start narrowing down your lists.

When you find a school that looks interesting to you, check out their website - thoroughly! All schools will have a part of their site dedicated to “admissions” and that part will tell you exactly what you need to do to get into that school. (If you’re helping your non-US-citizen friends, US schools also generally have a subsection on the admissions page for “international student admissions”. The list of entry requirements will be similar, but will vary slightly.) For most colleges, in addition to your SAT’s or ACT’s, you can expect to have to fill out an application, write an essay, send your high school transcripts, and possibly get some letters of recommendation. Each school varies slightly, though, so read their admissions requirements carefully.

In terms of financial aid, there are 4 types you may qualify for: grants, scholarships, loans, and work-study programs. Check out the links below for some good explanations of and resources on those. American colleges are super expensive, so check out lots of options for financial aid. Many students also choose to start by going to a community college for 2 years, which is cheaper, then transfer to another university to earn their 4 year degree.

Good luck with your search!

Alison recommends the following next steps:

https://www.usnews.com/education/best-colleges/paying-for-college/articles/how-to-find-and-secure-scholarships-for-college
https://www.usnews.com/education/best-colleges/paying-for-college/articles/an-ultimate-guide-to-understanding-college-financial-aid
Thank you comment icon this has been helpful! thank you. i shall look into it more RACH
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Jac’s Answer

I came from a low income family so really depended on scholarships and financial aid. Here's what was relevant when I applied to college 14 years ago...

Always look at the fine print of the rules for scholarships. Apply for national ones, not related to any school. There are often stipulations around being an American citizen OR an American resident. You have American citizenship on your side so that's a great thing! You can start applying for scholarships as early as 9th grade, so start whenever and start a savings account!

Many colleges offer scholarships that you won't know about until you apply. Sometimes you get entered into a scholarship without even knowing it - those are merit scholarships. These are typically related to GPA/grades.

Consider your options for financial aid, too. This is different from scholarships and is offered to students from low-income families. This is typically college-specific but you can see if you qualify for for federal financial aid. You'll have to read if they care more about citizenship versus residency. State colleges tend to give more aid to in-state students and are more expensive for out-of-state students. Private schools tends to give more financial aid but have higher tuitions. Schools often see international students as $$$, as international students tend to pay tuition full price. Again, as an American citizen, however, you may not be considered an international student and you'll want to clarify that with the college.
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