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Can you choose what field in nursing you want to work in?

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Let's say I want to work in Labor & Delivery as soon as I pass the NCLEX and would start looking at nursing job openings. Can I choose Labor & Delivery or would I be assigned? #july20

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John’s Answer

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Carmilia pediatric nurses work in hospital and clinical settings with pediatricians, monitoring and providing care to children and infants. Four-year BSN training programs are one of three educational paths to becoming a registered nurse (RN); other programs include diploma or associate degree programs in nursing (ADN). However, accredited BSN programs, which required a high school diploma or GED for enrollment, provide better employment and advancement opportunities upon graduation. In order to get a job as a pediatric nurse, professionals must pass the National Council Licensing Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) to become a registered nurse.

3-WAYS TO BECOME A REGISTERED NURSE

1.) NURSING DIPLOMA – Hospitals offer nursing diploma programs which may take 2-3 years to complete. Students take courses in anatomy, physiology and child psychology in addition to working with healthcare professionals to learn nursing skills.

2.) ASSOCIATE DEGREE IN NURSING (ADN)
Students seeking to enroll in an associate's degree in nursing should have a keen desire to help patients and people, in general. Different schools might have different admission requirements, but many of them ask for a high school diploma or equivalent with a GPA of at least 2.5. Some colleges also conduct entrance evaluation exams to admit students into the associate's degree of nursing, and an interview may be required, as well. A student should also have had subjects like biology and chemistry in high school, and certain prerequisite college courses may be required before continuation in the ADN program.

3.) BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NURSING (BSN)
First-time nursing students pursuing a BSN spend their first two years completing general liberal arts education requirements, as well as nursing prerequisites as pre-nursing majors. Students then apply for acceptance into the upper division nursing program to complete their final four semesters of advanced coursework and clinical experiences. Supervised clinicals help develop competencies in nursing therapies, leadership, health interventions, and general care for patients with acute and chronic illnesses.

LICSNSING REQUIREMENTS
All working nurses must be licensed and registered. Aspiring pediatric nurses must become registered nurses by successfully passing the NCLEX-RN exam. This exam proves an understanding of fundamental skills and principles required for providing quality care in the workplace. Some states have additional requirements for licensure, so prospective candidates may consider consulting their respective state board.

PEDIATRIC NURSING (RN) CAREER INFORMATION
Pediatric nurses work closely with pediatricians to administer medication and provide routine medical care to children and infants. Some typical duties include inserting catheters, taking a patient's blood pressure and taking blood samples. Pediatric nurses also assist families with the psychological impact of having a child diagnosed with a disease or illness. Pediatric nurses will find more opportunities if they pursue higher levels of education. Only in a master's nursing program can a professional specialize in pediatric nursing, though courses in pediatrics are available in associate's and bachelor's degrees. Every state requires all nurses to be licensed and registered in order to work, but some states may have specific licensure requirements. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), a 12% increase in the employment of registered nurses was expected for the 2018-2028 period. This growth is much faster than the national average for all occupations. The average Pediatric Nurse salary in the United States is $74,250 as of June 28, 2020, but the range typically falls between $65,000 and $82,500. Salary ranges can vary widely depending on many important factors, including education, certifications, additional skills, the number of years you have spent in your profession.

While registered nurses may be able to focus on pediatric care in their work, earning a Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) allows students to focus on a specialty area. Individuals who wish to become advanced practice nurses and specifically care for children and infants may become pediatric nurse practitioners (PNPs). An MSN program with a focus on pediatric care may be completed in 2-3 years. Some programs require the completion of a research project in addition to their classroom education and clinical care experience. Courses introduce advanced concepts in nursing practice, addressing topics such as diagnostic reasoning, clinical pharmacology and acute childcare.

PEDIATRIC NURSE PRACTITIONER (PNP) CAREER INFORMATION
A pediatric nurse practitioner works closely with physicians and other health care professionals to care for patients under the age of 18. A PNP might be a patient's main medical caregiver who diagnoses and treats chronic diseases, injuries, illnesses and infections. Pediatric nurse practitioners also assist the families of chronically ill or sick children. They might perform physical examinations and rehabilitation treatments for kids who have lost some ability to walk or stand, due to an accident or illness. They provide preventative care information for parents and teach them to care for a child at home. Nursing careers are booming, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). The BLS reported that careers for all nurse practitioners are expected to grow faster than average, at a rate of 28% from 2018-2028. The average Pediatric Nurse Practitioner (NP) salary in the United States is $106,500 as of June 28, 2020, but the range typically falls between $99,500 and $111,800. Salary ranges can vary widely depending on many important factors, including education, certifications, additional skills, the number of years you have spent in your profession.

Carmilia in addition to education, one of the primary considerations one makes when choosing a career path is the earning potential of a given profession. If you're thinking of becoming a pediatric nurse practitioner or pediatric nurse, you should be aware that your salary (and potential for that salary to increase) is heavily dependent on your skills, experience level, and the even the state in which you work.

Hope this was Helpful Carmilia
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victoria’s Answer

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Hi there. Many nursing areas offer entry level positions. It honestly depends on what is available when you graduate and when your career search begins. when applying to a hospital typically you apply directly to the unit/specialty area which is hiring.

If the demand for labor and delivery nurses, in your area, is low at that time it may be difficult for you to find a position. unless you are ok with waiting until the demand increase, you may explore other areas while you wait to see if openings come.

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