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How do you make your mind let go of work/school when you're specifically trying to decompress?

#july20 #work #healthcare #school #work-life-balance #medicine #technology #nuclearmedicinetechnology #psychology #biology #radiology #intern

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Margaret’s Answer

Meditation is an excellent method of letting your mind go and decompress. Personally, I meditate twice a day to start and end my day with a clear and balanced head. Meditation is not about thinking of nothing, but more so observing what you are thinking/feeling, acknowledge that you have that thought but not not thinking any deeper or go into details about your thoughts but simply acknowledging they are there. After observing those thoughts, say to yourself, "ok," breathe, and observe just being. It's hard at first but with practice, meditation can help you decompress anytime, anywhere, within seconds.
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Sloane’s Answer

Hi Kaela, great question! When trying to decompress, I tend to find it working the best for me when it's an activity I really enjoy. For example, I enjoy taking walks with my dog, spending time with friends, or even watching a show on Netflix or TV. I find it especially important to think of activities that you know will distract your mind from stress. I would give advice on paying attention to those activities or hobbies you really enjoy and are able to completely take a step back from your school or work stress with.

It's equally important to make sure you're blocking off that time for yourself to decompress with those activities. Where our society is at now, technology wise, it's easy to access your work or schoolwork at any time and feel like you should be doing something productive at all times. But it's important to keep in mind that your work-life balance should remain a priority. For me, I've found success in doing this by having scheduled time during the day that's devoted to my work or school work, and saving the rest of the time during my day for myself to decompress. Hope this helps!
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Diego’s Answer

If you are working from home, I would recommend having a separate work space that you can leave when you are done with work for the day so that it is easier to mentally separate. I also like going on runs and when I go running, I try to keep my mind as blank as possible, sort of like meditating but while being active. Getting physically tired for me allows me to take a mental break from work.
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Sindhu’s Answer

Kaela, this is a great question! A few things I've tried that have partially helped me, but I'm still trying to figure this out after over 20 years of working.
1) Meditation: I use an app like Calm or Headspace to try and meditate for 10-15 minutes before bed. When I do this consistently, it is easier for me to decompress and get better quality sleep.
2) Reading/Non-work or school activity: Another thing that helps me is reading, playing a game, or watching a TV show for at least 30 minutes after I wrap up work so I stop thinking about work and my mind is engaged in something else. A show doesn't work as well for me as reading a book or playing a puzzle-type game that requires concentration.
3) Phone notifications: I turn off all phone notifications when I want to decompress. If I see or hear that I have a work email, I feel the need to address it quickly, so turning off visual and sound notifications helps me do that.
4) Maintain a list: Despite trying all of the above, sometimes work ideas and "to dos" pop up frequently. Rather than address them when they do, I put them on a paper "to do" list for the next day. Removes any mental energy spent on trying to remember it for the next day.

Hope that helps. Good luck!
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Fatima’s Answer

One of the ways I've found helpful to decompress is to go for a walk or get outside and just breathe. Decompressing is a transitory phase, where you're trying to release some tension from a work or school day. If you've been inside a building or house all day, your body needs a different environment to tell it that you're physically changes spaces. Breathing really helps regulate the tensions and walking can also be beneficial because you're likely away from a screen, outside, and you get a chance to practice being more grounded.
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Kristín’s Answer

When your mind and body are overloaded, it is easy to get anxious, stressed, losing sleep and valuable energy. At the start of each day, I take 10-15 minutes (and let's be honest, sometimes it is just 1 or 2 minutes) to close my eyes and breathe deep. Noticing the way the breath feels as it enters the body, (how it feels to hold on to something that is not yours to keep at the top of an inhale), and noticing the way the breath feels leaving the body, (how it feels to have all of your air squeezed out, yearning for the next breath). If we learn to flow with our breath's natural patterns, the way our bodies automatically take in and let out each breath, we can apply those thoughts to life as well. We learn over time to let go of things that no longer serve us, and stop yearning for what we don't have and find peace and gratitude within our own truth. Anytime during the day that I feel overwhelmed, I take a big deep breath in and a slow long exhale -- making the exhale longer than your inhale can slow your heart rate down and calm the central nervous system. Yoga is a passion of mine as well, adding a physical practice to my meditation. Sometimes there are just thoughts and emotions stuck in our bodies, and by moving through the feeling, we can learn to release what is not meant to be held onto. Yoga can be gentle and "yin" or a more active hatha or hot yoga practice, but the result is all the same - connecting the body and mind together through your breath. In turn, you are less stressed naturally going with "the flow" and have the needed energy to tackle life's more challenging situations with a calm mind and open heart.
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Suyash’s Answer

This is a great question!

I'm going to talk about my personal experience - what helps me!
Having a work life balance is really important. Although its not really a work life balance if your work/study is bothering you during your personal time as well.
This generally comes from being worried about something at work/study. It is really important that one should do something that he/she is really passionate about. This really helps distract you from your original thoughts. Often times, trying to do something creative helps.
A few times I have called up my friends or my family and asked them if they need help with something. Most of the times, they do have something that they need help with. You start helping them and realize that you have spent alot of time helping others. This makes you feel like you have accomplished something.
Meditation is another way of destressing.
Let me know if you'd like to hear more on any of the above points.

Suyash recommends the following next steps:

Pick up a creative project
Take time to pursue some passion
Help others with their projects
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Polly’s Answer

Great question! I just learned about a technique this week that is called the 5,4,3,2,1 technique. This is also being used in schools with students of all ages to help destress!

https://www.urmc.rochester.edu/behavioral-health-partners/bhp-blog/april-2018/5-4-3-2-1-coping-technique-for-anxiety.aspx

5, 4, 3, 2, 1 GROUNDING EXERCISE
HOW TO DO IT:
This technique will take you through your five senses to help remind you of the present. This is a
calming technique that can help you get through tough or stressful situations.
Take a deep belly breath to begin.

5 - LOOK: Look around for 5 things that you
can see, and say them out loud. For example,
you could say, I see the computer, I see the
cup, I see the picture frame.

4 - FEEL: Pay attention to your body and think
of 4 things that you can feel, and say them out
loud. For example, you could say, I feel my feet
warm in my socks, I feel the hair on the back of
my neck, or I feel the pillow I am sitting on.

3 - LISTEN: Listen for 3 sounds. It could be the
sound of traffic outside, the sound of typing or
the sound of your tummy rumbling. Say the
three things out loud.

2 - SMELL: Say two
things you can smell. If you’re allowed to, it’s
okay to move to another spot and sniff
something. If you can’t smell anything at the
moment or you can’t move, then name your 2
favorite smells.

1 - TASTE: Say one thing you can taste. It may
be the toothpaste from brushing your teeth, or
a mint from after lunch. If you can’t taste anything, then say your favorite thing to taste.
Take another
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Krasti’s Answer

Hi Kaela,
There are a lot of great tips already mentioned here. I would emphasize on a few that I found very helpful myself. When I am trying to decompress, I usually do one of the following:

1. practice mindfulness, especially meditation - this is actually really challenging if you are a beginner. But the long term benefits are amazing and you can gain a peaceful mind if you commit to it

2. do an activity that you enjoy and gets you in your flow state - for me, that's exercise. Whenever I am exercise, I don't think about anything else besides trying to push myself physically to achieving my fitness goals. It is an activity that makes me think of the "present time" rather than think about the past or future deadlines. for you, it could be painting, cooking, etc.

3. keep a gratitude journal and jot down 3 things you are grateful for each day - this may sound silly but it is a good exercise to practice because it forces you to take a step back and think about what you appreciate in life. It forces your mind to be positive and you may start to realize that the things that were stressing you out initially were not worth stressing about.

Good luck and stay positive!
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Jeffrey’s Answer

Your health is the most important thing you are responsible for, your job and school will be there the next day. Don't procrastinate on your responsibilities and that will lead to less last minute deadlines which can have a huge impact on stress. Control what you have control over and let everything else go or differ it to the responsible party.
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Kimberly’s Answer

Great question! If I am looking to decompress, I will find a new work out video on YouTube or I will sit outside enjoying sounds of nature. Both of these activities help me get my mind off of work to wind down for the day. If it's winter or raining outside, I will find a new show or movie to watch on Netflix. This is my way of escaping the world around me to dive into the mind of another character.

If you are looking for something new to help you decompress, I recommend something that you enjoy or something that would avoid tension. For me, playing a high intense video game with friends makes me stressed out instead of feeling decompressed. In this case, I avoid these activities for the time being.
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Sheila’s Answer

Hello Kaela: This is a great question and you've received some very good responses. I'll keep it simple for you from my viewpoint.

One way I decompress is by window shopping/browsing online at Amazon (I love to (window) shop). In my household there's always someone ordering products on the site just to keep from physically going into a store.

Another way I decompress is by watching TV shows that I like. I'm a big fan of TCM (Turner Classic Movies). Anything Vincent Price & Bette Davis I could watch forever; in addition to monster, suspense, disaster, drama and scary movies on TCM.

I'm sure you'll eventually find what works for you when decompressing and clearing your mind. Think outside of the box. It doesn't have to be structured and complicated. Just find what you are passionate about and do it.

Best of luck to you!

~ Sheila

Sheila recommends the following next steps:

Try window/browsing shopping (you don't have to buy anything). It's literally a distraction
Tune into your favorite TV shows
Think outside of the box and find what you are passionate about and do it
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Eddy’s Answer

One of the most important things for me personally is to get a change of scenery. If you've spent all day locked inside due to school/uni/office jobs, go outside. Take a walk, ideally somewhere where there is nature around. If you've spent all day outside, take a breather indoors, do some meditation excercises or do something you're passionate about indoors (that dish you always wanted to cook, that song you always wanted to learn how to play, etc.).
Acknowledge that you're stressed about work/uni/school to yourself and actively identify the things that make you forget about those worries. It is crucial that you do not let negativity take a hold of you. Try not to complain to your peers about your perceived levels of stress and don't engage in conversations that you just give you what you want to hear. Instead, focus on a positive mindset and solutions that will help you decompress, seek out solution-oriented conversations that help will you manage your stress more effectively in the future.

Eddy recommends the following next steps:

Engage in outside physical activity
Try medition (I can personally recommend the app Headspace)
Work on hobbies and skills that you are passionate about
Get a change of scenery
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Caroline’s Answer

I try to make time for myself by doing things I enjoy outside of work such as running, reading, exercising, hanging with friends and I turn off my work phone/notifications when I am participating in those things. It is easier said than done especially in times when work gets super busy. If you are anxious about something at work I also think it is helpful to talk to someone either a coworker who you have more of a friendly relationship with or with a friend or family member who is not familiar with your work. Sometimes when explaining what you are getting anxious about to other people you realize that it is something that is silly to be anxious over.
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Kevin’s Answer

I tend to take a long job or run out in the open trails to decompress from work. Sometimes if it has been a stressful work day, I add high intensity running sprints for 3-5 minutes and then alternate back to a moderate jog for the same time. Running is an acquired taste and is a great stress reliever. I hated running before but set your goal for half a mile and move your way up to 1, 3, 5 mile goals.

You can also find other sports, fitness routines, or even hobby to decompress.
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Benjamin’s Answer

Hi Kaela,

Do what makes you happy! It will always be easiest to decompress when you are happy. Personally, I work out and lift weights in order to decompress when I feel stressed. However, before I learned that working out best helps me decompress, I tried many methods to decompress such as meditating which I found to be great for me. Although I do not meditate often, I have found that it can be extremely helpful when I feel overwhelmed. Overall, doing what makes you happy is optimal, but trying new methods to decompress can also be beneficial.

I hope this answer helps!
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