Skip to main content
8 answers
9
Asked 634 views

What can help me find the career I want ?

#cool # funny # successful
#respectful

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

9

8 answers


5
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Doc’s Answer

Shaniah for many young adults, entering the workforce can be jarring. Throughout your life, you’ve been told the importance of becoming a well-rounded individual. So you tried different activities, studied various subjects, and developed a wide variety of interests. Then you have to pick a career path. Suddenly, it feels like you need to pick between your love of technology or art; politics or music. You have to decide what will be your career and what will be demoted to a weekend hobby. With thousands of options, how will you choose a career that's right for you? If you don't have any idea what you want to do, the task may seem insurmountable. Fortunately, it isn't. Follow an organized process and you will increase your chances of making a good decision.

SELF ASSESSMENT
Before you can choose the right career, you must learn about yourself. Your values, interests, soft skills, and aptitudes, in combination with your personality type, make some occupations a good fit for you and others completely inappropriate. Use self-assessment tools, and career tests to gather information about your traits and, subsequently, generate a list of occupations that are a good fit based on them. Some people choose to work with a career counselor or other career development professionals who can help them navigate this process.

CREAT A LIST OF CAREERS TO EXPLORE
Career exploration focuses on learning about the occupations that seem to be a good fit based on the results of your self assessment and any other professions that interest you. Use online and print resources to get a job description, learn about specific job duties, and gather labor market information including median salaries and job outlooks. After completing this preliminary research, you can start eliminating professions that don't appeal to you and get more details about those that do. This is an ideal time to conduct informational interviews and arrange job shadowing opportunities. During an informational interview, you will ask people who work in an occupation that interests you questions about their jobs. Job shadowing involves following someone around at work in order to learn more about what they do.

DO YOUR HOMEWORK
When you have only a few occupations left on your list, start doing more in-depth research. Arrange to meet with people who work in the occupations in which you are interested. They can provide firsthand knowledge about the careers on your short list. Access your network, including LinkedIn, to find people with whom to have these informational interviews. Finally, after doing all your research, you are probably ready to make your choice. Pick the occupation that you think will bring you the most satisfaction based on all the information you have gathered. Realize that you are allowed do-overs if you change your mind about your choice at any point in your life. Many people change their careers at least a few times.

IDENTIFY YOUR GOALS
Once you make a decision, identify your long- and short-term goals. This helps to chart a course toward eventually landing work in your chosen field. Long-term goals typically take about three to five years to reach, while you can usually fulfill a short-term goal in six months to three years. Let the research you did about required education and training be your guide. If you don't have all the details, do some more research. Finally it's time to make a match!
• Identify the occupation in which you are most interested and one or two alternatives on which to fall back if, for any reason, you can't pursue your first choice.
• Give serious thought to how you will prepare to enter your chosen career, the costs associated with education and training, and whether you will face any barriers, which are the realities discussed during step one.
• Go back to step two if you find you need to explore your options further before making a decision.

CREATE AN ACTION PLAN
During this step, you will write a career action plan. It will serve as a guide to reaching your ultimate goal of getting a job in the career you deemed to be a good match during step three. Identify what long-term and short-term goals you will have to reach to get to the ultimate one. Start investigating appropriate education and training programs, for example, colleges, graduate schools, or apprenticeship programs. Then start preparing for required entrance examinations or applying for admission. If you are ready to seek employment, develop a job search strategy. Identify and learn about potential employers. Write your resume and cover letters. Begin to prepare for job interviews. Taking these steps early will save you a lot of struggle and uncertainty in the long run.

It is important to note that the career planning process never ends. At various points in your career, you may seek additional training or designations that can help you continue to pursue your goals. In some cases your career may take new turns or you may choose to redefine yourself and your goals. Whatever phase you may be at in your career, taking the time to plan will help to keep you focused and on a goal-oriented path.

Hope this was Helpful Shaniah
Thank you comment icon Thank You Candace. “Volunteers are the only human beings on the face of the earth who reflect this nation’s compassion, unselfish caring, patience, and just plain loving one another.” – Erma Bombeck Doc Frick
Thank you comment icon Thank You for your Continued Support Dexter. If you talk about it, it’s a dream. If you envision it, it’s possible. If you schedule it, it’s real. Doc Frick
Thank you comment icon Thank You Aslon. “The purpose of life is not to be happy, but to matter– to be productive, to be useful, to have it make some difference that you have lived at all.” – Leo Rosten Doc Frick
Thank you comment icon Thank You Kelli. “Volunteers do not necessarily have the time; they just have the heart.” – Elizabeth Andrew Doc Frick
5
1
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Tracy’s Answer

Shaniah,

I understand that choosing a future career can be difficult. Understand that it is NOT a race, but a journey.

What are you passionate about? What do you like to do? What interests you? What do you NOT like? Ask yourself these questions. Make a list of what do you like vs what you do not. Shadow the fields that you think are interesting to you. In order to really decide what it is that you really like, you should try to see what you would want to get yourself into. Do your research into the field. Allow yourself to options.

Let me know if this helps!
Tracy.
1
1
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Craig’s Answer

Think about what makes you happy and remember you can have two or three careers in parallel or one after the other :-)
1
1
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

JOSEPH’s Answer

The best careers are the ones that make you happy and fell a sense of accomplishment. These are the ones that you are most passionate about. If you pick a career that follows your passion, you will always enjoy your work and have a sense of fulfillment and accomplishment.

Choosing a career is not always easy, but if you follow the items that you love to do, you will love your work and make it a career.
1
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Simeon’s Answer

The starting point I usually recommend is going to the department of labor's website and seeing what the fastest growing fields are. That will give you a starting point if you're drawing a blank about what you'd like to do. I'd also recommend looking at YouTube videos where employees discuss their favorite and least favorite parts of their jobs. One of the downsides to a lot of career decision materials is that they don't usually tell you the downsides of different careers, so it might help you narrow down the options you're considering.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Lina’s Answer

I have different view points on this -

If you're still in college, exploring different courses and clubs will definitely help you decide on your future career path. Networking, speaking to different types of people who have picked different careers will also be valuable in your. However, if you're still facing difficulty, there is nothing wrong with picking a major that can be versatile and fit many careers, such as Finance if you're interested in business.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Nick’s Answer

Look at the people around you and notice who you admire. Find out what they do. It may lead you to understand your own interests. Sometimes a career "runs in the family". It could also lead to finding a mentor that can help you understand how to get started.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Lucia’s Answer

There are many factors that should influence your career decision, and the best decision would be made based on a combination of those factors. It is very important to understand what really motivates you and what are you most passionate about. However, I would strongly recommend to really think and differentiate between what you like to do as a hobby and what you actually want to do as an occupation for many years. It is important to find a balance. Think about the goals you have in life such as well being, family, financial stability, work/life balance, etc.. If a certain career fulfills those goals, then it is the correct path. If you really like to do something, but it doesn't help you meet the majority of your goals, then you should re-assess.

In summary, I would recommend the following steps:

1) Self assessment - discover what you are most passionate about; know your strengths and identify your goals in life
2)Assess your options - research your career options; ask yourself these questions:
-What opportunities are available?
-How much time and effort can you and are you willing to invest towards a specific career?
-Can you work in any city or are you limited to specific locations?
-What are your strengths and weaknesses?
-What are the possible outcomes of your choice, positive and negative?
3) Ask others for advice - ask your family, friends, teachers, etc.
4)Narrow your career options - identify 4-5 career options based on your self assessment and your research
5) Start trying your options - try to get involved in the options you picked (there is always volunteering options, camps, special classes, books, people with experience in specific occupations, etc.) and see if you really see yourself doing that for many years. If not, you can always go back to #1 (this comes from a person who started as an art major and ended up with a degree in engineering)








0