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how to get into college

im am a 10 grade student that loves to play basketball and football. engineers


Ricardo I hope you are doing well. First step is to check with your High School Counselor to ensure you are taking the proper courses. Secondly, make sure you are striving to do your best in with the classes your are taking. The last thing make sure college is the path you want to take. There are may careers where two year degrees are sufficient. Tyson Mangrum, MBA

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Subject: Career question for you

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11 answers


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Dawn’s Answer

If you haven't already done so, make sure you speak with your school counselor and let them know you want to go to college. The should be able to guide you on the steps to prepare for going to college. They can give you advice on the classes you need to take to finish high school so you have the 'stepping stones' to get to your next chapter of your education. They can also give you advice on the financial part of going to college as well.
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Brandon’s Answer

Most importantly, identify why you want to go to college. Make more money, learn a specific skill, etc

Once identified, plan out your Jr and Sr year to ensure you take the appropriate classes.
You may need AP math or science classes for certain majors. Maybe you decide to focus on SAT/ACT prep to

Maybe you attend a local trade school while finishing HS so that you have a useable, trade skill to lean on while working towards a degree.
Physical trade skills are also a great safety net to more high end jobs, that might be harder to obtain or more volatile to keep.

Understand the overall Cost of schooling in-state (I recommend never paying to go out of state) vs out of state. What GPA and Test Scores are required for entry and go from there pursuing grants, scholarships etc. Your counselor will be able to help in this regard, but you can always double check the internet. There are hundreds of scholarships each year.
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Bryce’s Answer

Hi Ricardo,

Getting into college as become more complex over the years. Many schools have different requirements or expectations so specific requirements vary based on the schools you are interested in. Once you figure out the school you are interested in and look up their requirements you need to focus up to at the very least meet these requirements. Start taking high school serious now because if you wait until the end of Junior year or beginning of Senior year it will be too late. Don't just shoot to meet the requirements, try to exceed them. Exceeding the requirements in a lot of cases leads to merit based scholarships and less money out of your pocket.
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Derek’s Answer

Prior to attending or even applying for college, know what you want to do first. The worst thing you could do is go to college because that's what's expected of you after high school. Very few career paths actually require a degree (Teaching, medical, law, etc.) However, if you are open to other opportunities, there are trade schools available or just start by getting into the work force in an entry level position and work your way up. Find out what you want to do first.

If you don't know what you want to do, like me when I was leaving high school, just find a big company that you know of and work for them in any role. I started with Wells Fargo as a teller because I wanted a Mon-Fri job with holidays off to be with my family. Never knew that being a teller would lead me into my career path of financial advisory services. Ten years later, I have a degree (Paid for by my employer) and have loved learning about finance. I worked all through college and took 7 years to complete my degree, but that didn't stop me from progressing in the company because they were investing their money in me.

I am an advocate for college, but only if you pay cash for it, or get another employer to pay for it. I am also an advocate if it is needed to get into your career path you want. If it isn't required, then I would just start by working in the industry and worrying about a degree later, if it comes to that. At least that way you can save up cash to pay for it when needed.

Best of luck!
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Pouyan’s Answer

First of all, make sure to do some internal reflection to see what your dreams, hopes, future plans, and goals are in life, as well as what you are passionate about and what you enjoy doing or would enjoy doing as a career in the future. Check out various colleges and apply to those that you think fit your own individual personality the best, like the college's culture, values, atmosphere, reputation, etc.

When applying for colleges, things they look for in applications are: Your GPA, whether you may have taken some more challenging AP classes, organizations you were a part of, whether or not you held a leadership role/officer in any organization, volunteering, work experience, and any other unique talents you possess

They look for well-rounded students that have big life-long goals and dreams, that are driven, dedicated, and passionate about pursuing it. They want to know that you will be successful which is why these qualities are so important.

In a college interview (or any interview for that matter), the number one most important quality is AUTHENTICITY. I didn't know that when I was applying for college many years ago, but when asked questions in an interview, a lot of people get nervous and tend to say whatever answer they think "sounds good" to the interviewer or what they want to hear, rather than really speaking from the heart.

Make sure your schoolwork and studies are number one priority, if you plan on pursuing your education. But at the same time, have fun and make friends with people who are also pursuing college with similar goals as you because having a social circle of people like that around you will keep you motivated and inspired because you are all in it together, and then it becomes something to look forward to. It also helps you develop communication/people skills, which fits well with the criteria of "well-roundedness" as well.

See what kinds of programs different colleges have in areas that you want to participate in/your areas of interest like football. It's something you already enjoy doing, so it's one passion you are pursuing whilst simultaneously pursuing your education.
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Cay’s Answer

Focus on finding your passion and creating a story around it. If you love football, focus on community outreach on helping kids learn to play, do online training for this, create a group or club that has something to do with what you like about it. Another thing you could do is rally your team up and focus on a volunteer opportunity that people on your team can do as a team. A college likes to see that you are willing to take your passions and make a greater difference with it.
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Praveen’s Answer

I really appreciate you are interested in sports, I feel you can see your career as a sportsperson. if you are really interested in playing BB and FB keep your focus on that and practice every day but to focus on all this you need not sacrifice your education.
I always suggest you not to step down from education, apart from all failures from personal interests, still, if you have your certificates you can get a job and succeed in your life

think about this, don't leave you interest in playing, and don't leave your studies

Hi Praveen, I don't think the student is trying to decide between higher education and sports. I think they want to know how they can get into college (possibly play sports while there). Gurpreet Lally, CareerVillage.org Team

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Steve’s Answer

Play lots of your favorite sports in HS and then look to send your highlights video to NCAA coaches in the areas of interest that appeals to you. Easier to get into a NCAA DIII college vs. trying to get a full-ride scholarship in a DI or DII college. Do may college visits in your HS Junior year and get to know those coaches and communicate with them often. Let them know you are really interested in their program, assuming that you are.

Enjoy the college experience playing sports.
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Steve’s Answer

Play lots of your favorite sports in HS and then look to send your highlights video to NCAA coaches in the areas of interest that appeals to you. Easier to get into a NCAA DIII college vs. trying to get a full-ride scholarship in a DI or DII college. Do may college visits in your HS Junior year and get to know those coaches and communicate with them often. Let them know you are really interested in their program, assuming that you are.

Enjoy the college experience playing sports.
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Brandon’s Answer

Most importantly, identify why you want to go to college. Make more money, learn a specific skill, etc

Once identified, plan out your Jr and Sr year to ensure you take the appropriate classes.
You may need AP math or science classes for certain majors. Maybe you decide to focus on SAT/ACT prep to

Maybe you attend a local trade school while finishing HS so that you have a useable, trade skill to lean on while working towards a degree.
Physical trade skills are also a great safety net to more high end jobs, that might be harder to obtain or more volatile to keep.

Understand the overall Cost of schooling in-state (I recommend never paying to go out of state) vs out of state. What GPA and Test Scores are required for entry and go from there pursuing grants, scholarships etc. Your counselor will be able to help in this regard, but you can always double check the internet. There are hundreds of scholarships each year.
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Jenni’s Answer

As others have mentioned, it's helpful to know what you want to accomplish by going to college. You don't have to "have it all figured out right now", but if you know the general direction you want to head then you can start to create short and long-term goals to help you get to that path. Also, you'll want to make sure that you take courses in high school that are similar to the path you want to follow later. For example, if you are interested in a sports-related career, participate in those extra-curricular sports activities (e.g. basketball, football) in order to gain as much experience as you can. Take academic classes that your high school or local community adult learning center (if available) offers that may be related to sports, such as anatomy, physiology, kinesiology, etc. I realize not all schools offer the same type of courses, so of course consult with your high school counselor to help you build a path forward. Also, some community colleges allow high school students to take classes prior to graduation, to give you a jump start on your college path. This is also a great way to familiarize you with college campus itself, as well as college life in general - not to mention you can make progress towards your Associates Degree while you are still in high school! Pretty awesome! It's great that you are interested in college, and there are a lot of resources available online to help you. I would also recommend researching how to get into the college(s) of your choice, as well as financial aid / scholarships that are available to you - if this is a need that you have. Most of us who have gone to college have needed SOME type of assistance. Here is a good resource for you to check out: https://www.thecollegeexpo.org/students/steps-to-college. The better your grades are, the better chance you'll have at getting accepted to the college(s) of your choice. If you are able to go to community college first, it's usually cheaper than a University and you can get your general education classes taken care of and then transfer to a University as a Junior (3rd year student) later. This is a good choice if you are still uncertain of your path. If you are confident in your path, you could apply to a 4-year University from the beginning. Also check out COLLEGE FAIRS as this is a great way to get to know about the Colleges & Universities you are interested in. Here's a helpful link: https://www.thecollegeexpo.org/ncrf-events/events. One last tip: Many colleges/universities are interested in seeing how WELL-ROUNDED their applicants are. So, getting good grades is not enough sometimes, especially if the application process is very competitive at the college of your choice. My suggestion would be to engage in other activities (in addition to sports), such as musical or art courses or clubs, volunteer with your local church/community organization, and gain some work experience to show that you can handle responsibilities. Above all, be true to yourself and follow your heart and your dreams. Make time for yourself and take care of yourself in the meantime as this can be overwhelming (eat well, get enough sleep, exercise, etc.) You can do WHATEVER you set your heart & mind to! Find a good support system (family, friends, etc.) and ask for help and guidance when you need it. REACH FOR THE STARS!

Jenni recommends the following next steps:

Focus on keeping your grades up
Take High School courses that align with your future goals
Meet with your High School Counselor
Research Colleges / Universities you are interested in to learn how & when to apply
Research Financial Aid / Scholarships
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