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What are some jobs that require a math degree?

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Jim’s Answer

One lesser-known career path for someone pursuing a math degree is to become an actuary. If you haven't heard of it before, actuaries work mostly in the life insurance or property and casualty insurance space helping companies price insurance products so that the companies can still make money even when they need to pay out insurance claims. Actuaries can also work as consultants (which is what I do) helping companies manage their pension plans and ensuring that they have enough money today to pay out retirement benefits to their employees for the rest of their lives. Actuaries continue learning after getting a bachelor's degree (but you won't have to go to grad school). Instead, actuaries need to pass a series of rigorous examinations that require hundreds of hours of self-study while working full-time in order to earn their full actuarial credentials. That said, for those who can persevere through all of this generally enjoy fairly stable job prospects and good pay - actuary is often rated one of the best jobs.

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Mariana’s Answer

The only jobs that require a bachelor's degree in math (as in: you won't get this job if you aren't a math major) are probably teaching. However, there are many jobs where your love for numbers, strong foundation in math and quantitative skills will be appreciated and well rewarded - actuaries and data scientists are two examples. If you are considering majoring in math, the required classes usually have some flexibility, so I urge you to take at least one in probability and/or statistics, and also learn some programming. This will increase your marketability as a math major.
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David’s Answer

Mathematics is generally theory based and the application aspect is normally established in a different major. For example, engineering uses a lot of trigonometry whereas actuarial science uses probability and statistics. Hence, I wouldn’t say a career demands a math degree unless you want to be a mathematician or math teacher. When looking into university, I was keen on double majoring in Math and Finance/Business/Economics since I was keen on entering a field in that area. Hence, if you don’t focus on a specific major that has a mathematics aspect to it, double majoring would be a good alternative. With a math degree only, you still would have some catching up to do say, if you want to become an accountant or analyst.
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Andrew’s Answer

This is not an easy question to address. The job market open to a degree in mathematics is dependent on whether you attain a bachelor’s degree, a master’s degree, or a doctor’s degree.

On the other hand, it should be appreciated that mathematics is the language, not exclusively, of physical sciences, engineering, statistical science, and econometrics. Therefore, a bachelor’s degree, or even a minor, in mathematics can add value for many of the aforementioned fields as well as door opener for advanced degrees in these fields.

The most obvious career path for a holder of a bachelor’s degree in mathematics is in teaching mathematics from K through 12. It may be less obvious, but it is important to keep in mind that mathematics is all about analytical, quantitative, and logical reasoning. Many employers value such skills irrespective of their business ventures. Simply put, with mathematical training in your pocket, you can be easily “trained” or “directed” to serve the needs of many occupational fields.

Lastly, many holders of a master’s degree or doctor’s degree in mathematics find gainful occupations in physical sciences, engineering, statistical science, and econometrics. Of course, with a master’s or doctor’s degree in mathematics, college teaching can be a viable option too.

Prof. Au, this is great advice! I agree with your comments on "with mathematical training in your pocket, you can be easily “trained” or “directed” to serve the needs of many occupational fields". My daughter is a new high school Math teacher and she's looking forward to getting an advance degree. Thank you for your comments. Sheila Jordan

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