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Are pre- reqs the same for every major?

I have no idea how college works #confused

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Dakayla’s Answer

Hello Caitlin. The pre-requisites are not the same for every major. You should read and speak to your college advisor about the pre-requisites for your chosen major.
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Yasemin’s Answer

HI Caitlin! It's okay college can be confusing and it definitely took me time to adjust and plan out as well! Okay, so definitely see your adviser because they will have the most up-to-date information on classes and in the beginning of college you will receive a sheet or handbook that will list what classes you must take to fulfill your degree requirements. For every major it will be different, for example a Biology major will take science classes like Intro to Biology or Cell Molecular to name a few, while a Psychology major will take Intro to Psychology, Experimental Psychology and electives as well that will interest them. I took Adolescent Psychology and Forensic Psychology for example, but my best friend who was a Biology major, took different electives for her major that were heavily science-based. After your first semester you will get use to your classes and pre-reqs to take, in the meantime make sure to always meet with your adviser even if you feel okay in your classes, and make sure to check off classes that you have taken and mark ones that you still need to.

I wish you the best!
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Melody’s Answer

Hello, I am a sophomore at Northern Illinois University. From what I can see at my school pre requests are different for everybody. Even when you are minoring and majoring I have different ones. It really all depends on what you are getting into. In my school, you have to get into the school of your choosing after getting into Northern. I can talk about my experiences and it may be able to help you understand what you are getting into.
First of course you have your gen eds which is mostly the same for everybody. Whether you keep going after the first year of math or English is based on what you major or minor is. I took one year of math for my Freshman year but I had to keep going due to my Marketing minor. Although, my major is Visual Communication and I did not have to keep going with math if I have not had the minor. You should have an academic advisor and they really lay it all out for you which is nice.
I suggest talking to them for every question you have for your academic career the more knowledge you have of what you need to get done the clearer the path will be for you!
Always use your resources in college! Time flies by fast and taking in everything and understanding is crucial.
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Kim’s Answer

Hi Caitlin,

College can be a bit intimidating and confusing! You will want to spend a bit of time on-line reviewing college requirements, and meet with your college advisor.

Colleges use either a "semester hour" or "quarter hour" system. I am not familiar with quarter hours, so, I will discuss semester hours. There are fall, spring, and summer semesters. We will skip summer for now, as it is different. In the fall and spring, classes usually meet on either a M/W/F or T/Th schedule. T/Th classes are a little longer, since they meet only twice a week. Classes meet a total of 3 hours a week. If you pass, you get 3 semester hours of credit. Some classes are longer (biology with a lab, for example) and you would get more than 3 credits for those. Some are shorter, such as Library Orientation, and you get less credit for those.

Anyway, the state/school mandate certain classes, which come out to about 45 credit hours. (a 4-yr degree is usually at least 120 hrs.) You usually have some flexibility on which class you choose to satisfy a requirement. For example, instead of US Government, you might be able to take a class on the US Constitution. There are lists that tell you what your choices are. The required coursework covers Math, English, Literature, the arts, Science, foreign language. Get familiar with your choices, and take classes that appeal to you! One problem, not all classes are offered every semester. Finding out the times they are offered takes some work. For example, it might be that Shakespearean Literature is only offered in the Fall semester. The various department offices should be able to give you some info on this.

In addition to the school/state requirements, there will be a list of classes you must take to satisfy the requirements for your major. You do not have to wait until you finish the basics before you start on the classwork for the major. Again, there will be some choices on some classes. Some classes will be required, such as Research Methods and Senior Seminar.

Hopefully your advisor will provide you with a form to keep track of the requirements and which class you took to satisfy each requirement. If not, I highly recommend you create your own! It's a lot to keep up with! A word of caution: a class cannot normally satisfy two requirements. So, if you took the US Constitution class in place of US Government, and you are a Political Science major, you cannot also count that US Constitution class to satisfy a requirement in your major that you must take a class covering the US Constitution. You will need to find a different class, perhaps one on the Bill of Rights.

Once you actually start the process, it will all begin to make sense. You are wise to be asking questions now!
Kim
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