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What major is most useful and needed to become a financial analyst?

I want to be a financial analyst because I like managing and saving money. I am good at math and am good with numbers. #money #money-management

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Jami’s Answer

Maybe business management or accounting.
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Kasandra’s Answer

You can try Actuarial Sciences or Accounting
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Kandarp’s Answer

Hi Damian,

Financial analysts is a broad group of jobs - it could be at a corporation, nonprofit, investment bank, personal wealth management, etc. It seems like you're interested in being a financial advisor. The most common degrees and coursework are typically accounting, finance, economics, general business, and potentially law, math, tax. There are also certifications and licenses that may be required depending on the type of work.
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Hilda’s Answer

If you want to become a financial analyst you will need to take specialized courses or training in the future . However, would recommend you major in an area of your interest rather than specialize so early.
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Kenneth’s Answer

Hi, Damian. I retired three years ago as a Certified Financial Planner(TM) and senior financial advisor, and I still teach finance courses at a local college. Hopefully, I can share some insight. The term "financial analyst" is a broad term. There are financial analysts who work for companies and study financial data to determine if a firm is managed efficiently. There are other financial analysts who work for investment firms and study companies with the possibility of investing in those companies. There are also financial advisers, like me, who advised individuals and businesses on the proper way to manage their money. All of the positions I mention require a sound knowledge of accounting and finance. It is also helpful to have good relationship, analytical and creative skills. A bachelor's degree would be the bare minimum. An MBA is preferred, along with an additional designation like CFA, CFP(R), or CIMA, depending on the field you follow. Don't be overwhelmed with the education I mention. If you continue to learn and improve your skills, your degrees and designations will follow. I hope this information helps! Good luck!

Kenneth recommends the following next steps:

Check out videos or book about the different types of financial analysis and financial planning.
Look at advertisements for jobs that may interest you. See what skills, education and experience that firms are seeking.
Speak to people who work in the field about what they do.
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