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Is there an "ideal" resume?

I have two resumes: the simple resume looks rather boring to me, as if it was made in high school (which it was!), but the professional resume looks like it has a lot of info that can deter others from reading it. What guidelines should I follow to make sure I don't put too much or too little information, and how can I keep it from looking mediocre? #professional #resume #editing

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Brandi’s Answer

I always keep several resumes tailored to the type of job I want. I don't use the same resume for a programming job that I do for an analyst job. It's all the same work that I've done, but I highlight different skills based on the skills for the position I'm applying to.


I like to design my resume as such:


At the top: Name and Summary of Qualifications (a short paragraph of what I've done that's pertinent to the job at hand)


Then the "meat", each job I worked with the job title, company, and dates, followed by detailed bullet points of the work I've done. It's good to use numbers in this. Instead of say, "Completed x project" more "Completed 200 lines of code programming for x project."


Then the end: Education, Certifications, etc.


I've been told that simplicity is better in this day and age because of the amount of resumes that have to be uploaded via computer. Keep that in mind.

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Stefania’s Answer

Hi Shakuan,


I'm so excited that you are putting so much thought in what goes into your resume. I'd personally go with the more professional one, although having a couple different versions depending on your prospect list wouldn't hurt. Make sure you keep it to ONE page.


Very top: Include your name, telephone number, email and linked in (if you have one. If you don't have a LinkedIn account, you may want to strongly consider getting one -- it's highly recommended for business networking and is a key way people are hiring these days).


Summary: 4-5 lines of paragraph form that summarize who you are, what you want to do and your key strengths (I am a Blank blank looking to bring value to blank blank. My key strengths include a, b, c, d and e.


Experience: Now, depending on HOW MUCH or WHAT TYPE of experience you have, you may want to list out your former employers/experiences highlighting your accomplishments with ACTION WORDS (e.g., supported, managed, headed, improved, collaborated, exercised close working practices, etc). IF, however, you don't feel like you've had a lot of experience (which could be the case if you are just coming out of school), you may want to opt and researched what's called a "functional resume" -- this is more focused on your SKILL SET and less on experience so, depending on the job prospects you are looking for, could also work for you as an alternative option.


Education and any additional information or accomplishments should follow.


I'm here for ANY additional questions you have or any need/advice around word choice assistance or what content should be included.


Good luck!
Stefania

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Katy’s Answer

Keep it to one page if you have less then 10 years of experience. No more then 3 bullets per job description. Use key words so they are picked up by search engines. It should look nice but don't overdue it with the formatting. Space is valuable and you need to really focus on content.


Make sure you clearly state what you want to do and skill sets pertinent to the industry. Use numbers and keep everything well organized with clear section headings.


I use:
Contact Information in the header: Linked in, email, phone etc...
Professional Summary: objective is listed here as well as a few key characteristics about me
Job History
Education
Technical skills
Awards and Volunteerism

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Christopher’s Answer

A resume is a living breathing document. It should be catered to each role you are applying for. Find key words in the job descriptions requirements and tailor your resume to that specific role. Customize it and keep it to 1 to 2 pages!

In most cases you have to also make sure your resumes are short, sweet, give stats, accomplishments and tell your story why you are a great fit for the role you apply for!

Check out this document on how to write an ATS friendly resume - https://www.indeed.com/career-advice/resumes-cover-letters/ats-resume-template
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