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Which Areas of Healthcare are Most Overlooked?

I want to explore where I can make a bigger impact in the future.
#healthcare #medicine #opportunities

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Chuck’s Answer

Hello Amand K:

Please copy and paste: https://www.phlebotomyexaminer.com/most-overlooked-jobs-in-medical-field/

These overlooked areas of healthcare are in this link for you.

Good luck.

Chuck recommends the following next steps:

Study the link provided
Look into the specific areas that are overlooked
Thank you comment icon Wow, thank you! Amanda
Thank you comment icon Glad to help you, Amanda! Chuck Intrieri
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Paula’s Answer

Hello Amanda,

Great question! My name is Paula, and for reference, I have 6 years of medical experience with the United States Army, and I'm currently a nursing student. In my personal experience community and public health are areas that are overlooked in the healthcare industry. I hope this helped!

Thank you comment icon Thank you! I appreciate the specificity. Amanda
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Sanober’s Answer

Hi Amanda,

I love your question and how you are thinking about areas that aren't talked about as much. In my opinion, systems thinking is missing in healthcare. By that, I mean being able to think about the faults in our healthcare system from levels outside of your specialty. For example, the injustices that are integrated into the healthcare system come from decades of a lack of change in the right direction. Racism is an area that isn't regarded as a healthcare inequality but it puts patients at a proven instant disadvantage when receiving care.

Hope this answer was able to give you an idea of the types of overlooked areas in our system.
Best of luck :)

Sanober
Thank you comment icon Thank you for the new perspective! I'll definitely look more into that. Amanda
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Jennifer’s Answer

Coordination and follow-through of social services, more assistance, advocacy and hand-holding for patients and ability to see their PCP providers in a timely manner, including for acute care needs and not preventative check-up maintenance for physicals and the like. It is often a challenge for patients who feel uncomfortable, out-of-place, and/or whose concerns that are not taken seriously or are disregarded by official representatives of medical institutions (various staff members who are in direct-patient roles, as well as behind-the-scenes working in administrative policy roles and in billing). For underserved populations with complex social needs that affect health outcomes, many of which have a strong SES component, are challenging to address when the direct user-experience and interface for a patient to interact with a given healthcare system is designed with barriers in mind. Ex: those who are food insecure, those who are housing insecure, those who need childcare, those who need elder services, those who live in institutionalized settings, those who do not own personal forms of transportation and are reliant on public transportation out of necessity, not choice, those who are un or under-employed with limited financial resources, those with various mobility and cognitive impairments and challenges, those who are not technology-savvy, those who do not have access to the internet, to fax machines, to smart phones, to internet-accessible devices, to working phone numbers with limited phone minutes, those who do not have a physical or non-PO Box mailing address to receive documents and to fulfill registration "requirements," those who do not have access to printers, photocopiers, or ability to physically go to post offices, stand in line, and purchase excess postage to mail relevant paperwork (which is often lost), to telehealth appointments, those who are un or under-insured, those who are bounced around the referral system, those with transportation difficulties, those who cannot afford their prescription and OTC medications/vitamins/supplements, those who do not have strong hyper-local social support systems that can help and immediately step in with practical caregiving when ill in acute environments, and then chronically with long-term care (such as affording grocery delivery...which is still, for the most part, impossible for SNAP EBT and WIC food stamp recipients). In some areas, health insurance plans that are provided &/or subsidized by states are so incredibly limited and geographically restricted. In the City of Boston, for Medicaid alone as a primary provider, there are a few different carriers that collectively, do not even cover all the providers within the City of Boston, itself, and are highly restricted to specific health systems...which may be fine if you never travel to the other side of the city and if you aren't in an emergent condition. But if you ever did travel elsewhere? You essentially have zero coverage in a non-emergent condition since everything else is considered out-of-network. There are so many social barriers to receiving care, that in a lot of cases, it makes it incredibly difficult for even a very motivated, and on-top-of-things patient to receive services, even if they need it, in a timely manner where it'll actually make a difference, even if they WANT to be compliant with their providers' recommendations...all of this is even BEFORE a patient is able to present, in-person, to an in-network provider. Ex: covid testing is still heavily restricted, especially at mass testing sites. Posted city covid testing locations are often with extremely limited hours, and with posted phone numbers that are heavily under or outright unstaffed and trying to follow up on results in a timely manner is next-to-impossible. Ability to access imaging, DME supplies, home services, etc. is extremely challenging. And for those who have tested covid positive, the ability to receive acute, non-emergent care by medical providers, is increasingly difficult. Make no mistake --- these are all examples of intentional poor systems design (lack of focus is intentional) and social engineering that on purpose, is not primarily focusing directly on providing whole patient-first care. Much more effort, dollars, and line item resources needs to be invested and re-invested in addressing and fixing many of these disparities and focusing first on the expressed needs of and by patients, themselves, and not on whether or not a provider can deign to elect and choose to schedule and see a patient based on their ability to contractually bill a health insurance carrier as an in-network service or to carry that patient as a line-item part of their panel they're reimbursed for while charged for their care under the ACO model.
Thank you comment icon Thank you for providing a new perspective! I'll be sure to keep these in mind when exploring healthcare career opportunities. Amanda
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Raquel’s Answer

Mental health and community health are two broad areas in the healthcare field that are not given as much attention but are extremely important. Rural areas are also always in need of improved access to healthcare and often struggle with maintaining healthcare workers. There is such a variety of areas to work in healthcare and all of them can use new people who are passionate about helping others! You can make a difference no matter where you decide to work.
Thank you comment icon Thank you! Amanda
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Sheila’s Answer

Hi Amanda:

Although I am not in the healthcare field this is a great question. Healthcare is a large field and covers many different areas. It's great that you're asking this question for overlooked careers. Here's a list of top 5 overlooked healthcare careers. . .

• MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTIONIST
This position consists of typing up doctors’ audio recordings into medical reports; it is vital to maintaining smooth administrative activity and coordinating care across disciplines. The more you work, the more you’ll make; the average earnings for this position are around $36,000. The perks include flexible schedules, the ability to work from home, and affordable training programs that can certify you in just a few months.

• DIETITIANS
Dietitians studying the science of nutrition and food. in this profession, you work with clients to assess their health needs and goals, develop plans of action and exercise, and advise them about their diets. The average salary is $59,000. Dietitians can work in all kinds of institutions, from hospitals to long-term care, colleges to program offices. You may also be able to work part-time and set flexible hours. You’ll need a degree and a license in order to practice.

• HEALTHCARE IT SPECIALIST
The growing tech needs of the healthcare industry mean that specialized it professionals can find rewarding, lucrative work in this field. Responsibilities include installing and maintaining records systems and networks, providing support to coworkers, and securing industry certifications like CMAA (Certified Medical Administrative Assistant) and CEHRS (Certified Electronic Health Records Specialist). Salary can range from $37,000 to $59,000 annually.

• MIDWIFE
Midwives are childbirth specialists trained in monitoring pregnancy, birth, and post-partum care. positions exist in hospitals, birthing centers, and even remotely in various homes. The on-call hours can be demanding, but scheduling is flexible and the work is undeniably rewarding. Salaries can run as high as $96k, and the field requires licensing and regular certification updates.

• MEDICAL CODER
Medical coders are used in healthcare to identify procedures and health issues for insurance and billing purposes. The average pay is $50,000 annually, more with specialized certifications; coders work in hospitals, institutions, and related office settings. Make sure you find a worthwhile training program that will provide you with support and job placement after graduation.

These are just top 5 overlooked medical careers for your research to help you get started. I wish you much success on your journey and best of luck to you!


Sheila recommends the following next steps:

Top 5 Overlooked Medical Careers • https://www.thejobnetwork.com/top-5-overlooked-and-rewarding-healthcare-careers/
Most Overlooked Medical Careers • https://www.phlebotomyexaminer.com/most-overlooked-jobs-in-medical-field/
Thank you comment icon Thank you for the specificity! Amanda
Thank you comment icon You're welcome. I love your question because you are looking at some very good areas. Keep up the good work. 😉 Sheila Jordan
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