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how do I pick a job?

i'm in highschool and I want a job that I really like but I don't like talking to people. #first-job

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Subject: Career question for you

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Doc’s Answer

Jordyn finding the right career for you requires a level of self-awareness on your part. You should be able to identify your strengths and weaknesses and adjust your job search accordingly. This can help you find a job that is tailored to your strengths and one that you find enjoyable. Whether you're an introvert who prefers to work on your own, or you prefer jobs that are not customer-oriented.

MAIL CARRIER – Mail carrier requirements include a high school diploma. According to the United States Postal Service (USPS), applicants must also have a high school diploma and basic competency in English. Mail carriers must be citizens of the United States, have a driver's license and a safe driving record, and pass a criminal background check. You'll need good customer service skills, physical stamina and should also be detail-oriented and have a strong work ethic. According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the median annual salary for a postal service mail carrier was $52,900.

SECURITY GUARD – Security officer education requirements vary, but most employers accept workers who hold a high school diploma, according to the BLS. Applicants must also pass criminal background checks and be fingerprinted. Nearly all states require security guards to complete the licensing process during the first few months of employment. To qualify for a license, applicants must first complete a mandatory training program. Those with work experience in law enforcement or technology will have the best prospects, according to the BLS. The median annual salary for security guards as of January 2021 was $34,500.

Happy Job Hunting Jordyn

Doc recommends the following next steps:

After earning a high school diploma, Jordyn you may also choose to increase your job options and salary potential by enrolling in a postsecondary educational program. High school graduates are eligible to enroll in certificate programs, which offer specialized training at a lower cost than college degrees. If going to college is a possibility, earning an undergraduate degree programs will enhance your opportunities, with associate's degrees being more affordable than bachelor's degrees. Some of these programs are available in part-time or online formats in order to accommodate the scheduling needs of high school graduates who are already working. It is also possible to find associate's programs that will directly transfer to a bachelor's program, which will reduce the overall price of earning a 4-year degree.
Thank you comment icon Thank you for your contined support Kim. Students don't make up 100 percent of our population, but they do make up 100 percent of our future. Doc Frick
Thank you comment icon Thank You Casey. “The meaning of life is to find your gift. The purpose of life is to give it away.” — William Shakespeare Doc Frick
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Erin’s Answer

Strategy time. Make a list of what you like to do and look into careers that let you do those things. Take note of what skills they need from you and start building those now.

If you want a job that isn't heavy on people skills, it will almost certainly be heavy on other experience. Coding comes to mind, as does engineering and writing. Let's use a programmer position as an example.

The name of the game is experience, and the best way for you to get your foot in the door there is to come in with program knowledge and a coding language or two under your belt. Learn as much as you can. Look at free resources like Kahn Academy, W3Schools.com, and practice. If it's something you're passionate about, this part will be much easier.

As a high school student, you can't do much about a job needing x years of experience. You can beat them to the punch with programs and skills, though, and those go a very long way.

Erin recommends the following next steps:

Using your list of what you enjoy, look for careers that include those interests. Take into consideration what kind of life comes with that job (hours, workload, etc.,)
Look at skills and programs needed for the jobs you're interested in.
Pick a skill or program that you see the most and also do not currently possess. Start learning that skill or program today.
Join LinkedIn groups that center around that job. Start becoming part of the community. Usually people are eager to help the mext generation get their foot in the door. Everyone's had to start out at some point or another.
Always keep moving forward. Take this one day at a time.
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Kim’s Answer

Jordyn,

There are different levels of "not talking to people." I found that I don't like letting people into "my space," so don't really like things like team projects, I did good at two jobs where I was in a position of authority dealing with other people. One was police officer, one was career counselor. Police dispatcher was also exciting. However, I could never see myself as a waitress, or working around people in a social setting, although, hotel clerk would be okay.

If you want less people-interaction, give some thought to the skilled trades: electrician, or electrical lineman, plumber, carpenter, painter, home remodeling, HVAC installation, mechanic, roofer, general construction, welder, landscape design, etc. Some of these have more interaction with the customer than others. No matter what you do, there's some degree of customer interaction. The key truly is to simply treat others the way you'd expect your grandmother to be treated.

Other positions where people come and go but you don't have to develop relationships, would include medical fields, such as an xray tech. Something routine but without people would be medical coding and billing, or any sort of data entry.

When you think about getting in your car and driving to work, what do you picture? What are you wearing? Where is your job site? Can you picture yourself at a desk all day? Do you want to be out somewhere on your own without a boss looking over your shoulder? All of these things change over time. For example, no one 20 years ago ever dreamed that truck drivers and doctors would be spending so much time on computers!

I hope you get some good ideas from us here!
The good news is, you are always able to change jobs. Sometimes you just need a different employer. Sometimes you need a career change.

Oh, one other idea. Visit a military recruiter and take the ASVAB test. Even if you don't want to go in the military. It lets you know your aptitudes - what you are good at. It doesn't mean you would like doing what you are good at, but, it's a place to start!
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Harish’s Answer

Hi Jordyn,

In this time of virtual-everything, talking to people can be avoided easily. Mostly you will need to talk to people when you are in Sales or Marketing. What you are looking for is something on the STEM side of the world where your skills talk for you rather than you. I might be biased as I myself am in the IT industry but I would suggest looking towards IT industry jobs for your future career.

Hope this helps.
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Simeon’s Answer

There are plenty of jobs that are fine options to take if you don't like talking to people. Degree options including being an accountant at a small company, being a librarian, or doing some kind of software engineering. Non-degree options would include trade jobs like welding, metal-working, plumbing, electrician, or HVAC tech.

If you are looking for job ideas, I'd recommend looking at the department of labor's website to see what some of the faster growing career fields are and if any of them are of interest to you. It's a good starting point if you are drawing a blank.
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Ethan’s Answer

Hi Jordyn,

That is definitely possible. I would narrow down what you DO like doing and look into things similar to that. I was very shy in high school so I know the feeling. I figured out early that I was into technology and looked into careers involving that. One thing I would suggest looking into is the growing field of social media marketing. I ended up taking that as my major and have since graduated, landing a job with Verizon. I would also tell you that not talking to people or being shy can change too. As I got more comfortable with my job, I was able to break out of my shell and even earn nationwide awards because of it. Stay positive and good luck with your future!

-Ethan
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Suleyman’s Answer

Every job has parts you will love and also parts that you might not. The thing is to find something that you love and you are passionate about. Believe me, the negative parts of it will be much easier for you to overcome when you are passionate about the thing you do.

Ohh and do not make your decision only on how much money you can make. I have been working for a company that paid a good salary but I hated the job. It took me a lot of willpower to wake up every morning and go to work. This is something you do not want.
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Kevin’s Answer

Don't stress too much about your first job! You are still in high school. Your first job should be something you may enjoy doing. Simple example could be life-guard or working at the movie theater! The values you learn from your first job are more important (e.g. discipline, value of a dollar).
You may not think it but these core values will help shape your future.
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Karen’s Answer

Selecting the right career can be tricky. I would suggest start with thinking about the types of things you like and make a list. Be open to exploring new things be curious about all the different types of careers.; with the internet you can learn so much about different opportunities. I would suggest not to rush yourself. If you are not sure start college & start to explore. Through college you will learn from the people you meet. You may find your passion & future career when you least expect it. Try not to stress about it
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Dominic’s Answer

my advice would be to make sure to pick something that you have an interest in, last thing you want to do is be stuck at a job that you dread waking up every morning to do. It make doing your job a lot easier and enjoyable when its something you have an interest in

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Jeffrey’s Answer

I have read posts from people that are garbage truck drivers so they stay in the truck and with overtime can make over $100k a year. You have to expand your horizons and think outside the box and a job you think might not pay well actually does and might not need additional schooling.
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April’s Answer

One option, which is the path I took, is to join the military. In order to join a branch, you must take the ASVAB test to determine where you skills best fit. I was provided a few different options and landed with a financial management specialist. Once you are in, you can also reclassify your military occupation specialty (MOS). I reclassified to Information Technology and was able to find that I preferred a career that would combine the two. This allowed for me to also figure out what I wanted to get my degree in. A benefit with this option, is that the military provides numerous benefits while both in and after your service to pay for your education.
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