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Is getting a masters degree worth it?


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Robert’s Answer

Yes!! At least from my experience anytime I can increase my knowledge i find it beneficial. It took me sometime to pick the right school and what I wanted to study but once i figured that out it helped so much in my current career which has lasted for over 20 years. I feel like my masters helped advance my career

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Valerie’s Answer

I think this generally depends on your field of study. I am a huge proponent of education, so, I definitely do not think it hurts. However, as far as being applicable to your professional career, I think it depends. I got a Master's Degree right after undergrad, and to be honest, I do not think it has helped accelerate my career. In Tech/go to market, really experience is the ultimate accelerator. However, if you're in a more technical field, it could help open opportunities for you as it can be a requirement.

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Kendall Paige’s Answer

Aloha, Nolan.

I'm a lifelong learner, so my answer to this question is a resounding YES!!! I knew I wanted to earn my bachelors, masters, and doctorate degrees from the time I was in high school. I haven't earned my doctorate YET, but I've been very fortunate to earn my Bachelor of Arts degree in 2004 and my MBA in 2011. I'm a firm believer that your education can never be taken away from you. It is an investment in yourself, not only professionally, but personally too.

If you are "on the fence" or considering whether a masters degree is the right path for you, I would encourage you to take some time to get some real world experience after you've graduated with your bachelors. I believe I have an even greater appreciation for my MBA having had a gap of six years from the time I graduated with my BA in 2004 before beginning my MBA in 2010. During those six years is when I really began my professional career, especially in a leadership capacity. By the time I started my MBA in 2010, I had some real world experience to draw upon which made me value & appreciate my masters program that much more. Not to mention the networking opportunity with my fellow students, our professors, and administrative staff.

Best of luck to you whichever path you choose!

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Simeon’s Answer

A master's degree is fulfilling and worth the time and money, but it depends on when you do it and what your goals are. Experience will always trump education, so if you have the ability to break into your field, the earlier the better, not just to get experience and references on you resume, but also to start building your professional network. Plus, many graduate degrees require some previous experience anyway. Prior experience makes all the knowledge gained in graduate work much more enriching because you can reflect on how the lessons apply to what you've seen in the field. Additionally, it'll be easier to sort out useful knowledge from unuseful theory and chatter.

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Margaret’s Answer

I would absolutely agree that getting your masters is worth it. (1) In general, learning something new is always exciting, (2) In this competitive environment, if you have a master's degree and others do not, that may help you as well in your job search. I would say that I found having some work experience helpful to be able to apply when I went for my MBA so I do agree that having some experience to relate to helps when going for your master's degree.

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Benjamin’s Answer

I think pursuing higher education is always good but it really depends on individual cases. It's better to work for a few years in your field of study before deciding to get your Masters. In many cases, people end up doing something completely unrelated to their undergrad degree. Also, many companies will pay for your Masters degree and higher. Some jobs may require Masters/PHD for the next level of progress in your carrier. Over all, it depends on your field of study. For example, if you have a four year psychology degree then you may want to get Masters and PHD if you want to get a good paying job. But if you know computer programming languages you can get a job even without an undergrad degree. So, it all depends on individual cases.

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Maria’s Answer

Holding a Masters of Science myself and being a professional in the field of my studies over the last 8 years, I can definitely say it's worth it! Overall, a Masters Degree offers specialization in your selected field, introduces you to more sophisticated terms and theories, while helps you link theory to practice. Honestly, you will be able to utilize the knowledge gained through your postgraduate studies after undertaking mid or senior level roles, but it can also act as a competitive advantage when it comes to promotions and career development. Of course, it is really important to identify your field of interest, explore available options in terms of Universities, Courses etc. and choose what suits you best. Consider a Masters Degree to be an investment in yourself, in order to reach a level of expertise that will help you grow both personally and professionally.

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Nicholas’s Answer

Hi!
I think it depends on what you mean by "worth it". Speaking financially, getting a masters degree can come with a huge bump in salary. The trade off here is how long you are willing to not be working and making money. If you enjoy learning, it can also be very fulfilling to learn more about a subject in which you are passionate. If the master's degree you want doesn't give you either of these things, it may not be worth it

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Gurpal’s Answer

In general, it is usually worth is especially if you are not going to get other certifications. It definitely helps advancing your career. My husband got his MBA a few years after getting his Bachelors and he found that he was more focused and actually interested in learning. If he would have joined the program right after getting his Bachelors, he would have been burned out and not as excited.

As for me, I moved around during college so I had enough credits to get my CPA after graduating with my Bachelors so I didn't feel the need to get a Masters. It was not worth it to me since my main goal was to become a CPA. That being said, it depends on everyone's situation, but it is a good thing in general.

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Joshua’s Answer

I absolutely felt that getting my masters degree was worth it. However, it really depends on what career field you are in. For instance, computer science may not be as beneficial for someone to complete a masters degree, but if you are in a career field such as accounting or finance, then it can be very positive. It is best to consider what job you are hoping to get at the end and see if the career ladder requires the additional knowledge that comes from a graduate degree.

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