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I cannot decide what to do to school for art or social work

I am pretty decent in social studies and English/Laguage arts

I don't like not knowing how to decide on a focus.
I seem to be good with people when I'm looked up to.
But I like art to communicate my emotional inner world.
Lack confidence for sure.
Negative thinker.
Gives more of self.
Always sorry.
But at least I'm not boring.
Or so I think
People like me?
Goal and risk taker.
Can't make money or save.
Living day to day
I'm gay
Away from keyboard
Still 馃 #social #social-skills #licensed #social-justice #licensed #social-services #social-skills

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

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Julie鈥檚 Answer

There's a saying "Do what you love, and you'll never be unhappy."

When deciding between art or social work, consider what you like to do most, and what brings you the most joy. For instance, art is about creating, whether painting, sculpture, or fiber art. It tends to be a solitary pursuit where you work alone. Your inspiration might come from yourself, nature, or other people. There are several avenues you can pursue as an artist from selling your creations to becoming a teacher, such as teaching at the high school level or within the community.

The challenge with becoming an artist, however, is sustainability. You may be a brilliant artist, but unless you can find a market (i.e., sell your art) or an employer (i.e., teacher), you might end up a "starving" artist or having to take a job in another profession.

Becoming a social worker takes more education, usually a Master's degree. It's usually a long-term job because there's never going to be a shortage of people who need assistance. Being a social worker requires collaborating with others, and consistently meeting with people. There's a wide range of fields for social workers from working in schools and assisting students to supporting community programs (e.g., finding housing for those in needs, working with battered women, etc.). And of course, healthcare organizations need social workers to provide in-person and telephone assistance. As an example, if you're admitted to a hospital, you'll probably be visited by a social worker.

Social work can be both fulfilling and disheartening, depending on the organizations or companies you support.

You wrote that you lack confidence and are a negative thinker. However, I suspect you're young, and at this point unsure of yourself. My recommendation is to find a university that you want to attend. Forget about declaring a major. Take a range of classes. Don't put limits on yourself. Explore many different fields.

In the end, you might become a social worker who uses art therapy to help people work through their challenges!!
Thank you comment icon Wow what a response thank 馃檱 you. Coleton John
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Denise鈥檚 Answer

You can do both - my daughter is! Social Work major, Art Minor. She plans to use Art in her Social Work pursuit! And art as a side business ;)
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Sam鈥檚 Answer

You should follow your heart. A profession in the arts is a risk which deters people from pursuing a career in the arts. If being an artist makes you happy, you should go for it. Just remember to do it because you love it. Financial success may or may not happen and you have to accept that.
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Cheri鈥檚 Answer

You may find a path that allows you to do both. Art Therapy programs are available at many universities these days, combining both counseling and Art. I suspect there will be more growth in this field as we learn more about how these programs support mental health.
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Simeon鈥檚 Answer

In general, I would go to the department of labor's website (https://www.dol.gov/) and see which fields are growing quickly these days. If you're drawing a blank on what you'd like to do, see if any of the fast growing fields call out to you. This will give you a lot more structure than trying to get a vague sense of your passions and trying to brainstorm a way to turn it into money. Most people don't have a passion that they are aware of right away. Also, passions tend to change from season to season. Lastly, look at videos on YouTube of people in their careers talking about what they love and hate. See if any of their descriptions sound like a good fit for you. It's just as important to figure out if you can deal with the downsides of a job as it is to figure out what you'd love about a job.
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