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What other careers involve studying history besides a teacher?

I love history. But, to be honest, I can't see myself as a teacher or anything like that. I also want a secure job, and I don't believe studying history will yield those results. Any advice? #history

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Allison’s Answer

Hey Anna,

As a fellow history lover, I struggled with the same question. By my freshmen year of high school I was set on majoring in history and living happily ever after, until my very pragmatic father asked me what I was going to do for a job after college. I still remember looking at him dumbfounded. He told me that with a history degree, I could probably write a book, teach, or possibly work at a museum. None of those options appealed to me and left me feeling a bit lost.

By my junior year of high school, I'd decided to major in business, but to minor in military history. I loved being able to go from my Management Accounting class to World War II in Europe. I was able to provide myself with a pragmatic degree, while satisfying my love of History. It was a choice I have never regretted. Ironically, I think having a History minor on my resume actually helped get me my current Management Consulting job. During the interview after reviewing my resume, the recruiter and I spent most of the interview discussing which world war was our favorite and why.

Good Luck!
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Archana’s Answer

Hi,


The percentage of history majors who become professional historians is low. Instead most go on to become lawyers, librarians, businesspersons, writers, archivists, researchers, teachers, politicians and even entertainers. Leaders in every industry, from business to the arts, can point to their training as history majors as the starting point for their success. Indeed, historical study plays an important part in fostering well-rounded intellectual development as well as instilling valuable career skills in research, writing, argumentation and documentation.


The market for teachers in primary and secondary schools remains good in many locations, and students with a solid background in history will be well suited to obtain teaching credentials in subjects such as history, social studies, government, political science, humanities, and general studies.


The rigorous research and writing requirements asked of history majors also offer excellent preparation for careers in law, journalism, public relations, technical writing, fundraising, administration, government service. Interestingly (and luckily for history majors) recent trends in medical and business school admissions suggest that professional schools are looking for students with training in humanities and social sciences. Students wishing to attend medical schools still need to take the necessary science prerequisites, but in an increasingly competitive market with growing competition, students differentiate themselves by means of attributes such as a background in the history of medicines or completion of a history honors thesis.


There are quite some career options which are discussed in detail on http://history.ucdavis.edu


I have listed a few of them here -


Historians as educators
Historians as researchers
Historians as writers and editors
Historians as information managers
Historians as advocates
Historians as businesspeople


Hope this helps.


All the best, do well.


Regards,
Archana Jain

Thank you comment icon That is very helpful. Thank you! In regards to what you said about the correlation between history and business, are there any types of colleges that would lend them self better to this more unique study path. Right now I am looking at liberal arts schools but am having trouble coming up with more than just one or two. I am very interested in North Carolina at Chapel hill but can't find any others that are similar. Anna
Thank you comment icon Hi, The research, writing, and analytical skills of the historian can be of great value to business corporations. So, typically there are no specific courses for Historians to enter the business world that I know of. However the recommended path would be to be a History Graduate, if possible, pursue Masters or Ph D in History and if you are able to do MBA after that, it can be the right thing to do. Which makes you a perfect fit for the market. Below link has a path paved for anyone who is looking for career options after studying History. http://study.com/be_a_historian.html Hope this helps. Regards, Archana Jain Archana Jain
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Rachel’s Answer

Many colleges provide incredible teaching programs. A few of the best in the nation are Johns Hopkins University, NYU, and UConn

Teaching involves a number of different skills and qualities. I would say the most important are:


  1. People skills - being friendly and working well with others. You will need to be personable, caring, kind, friendly, compassionate, and understanding. These qualities make a great teacher. But you also need to be stern and firm in your directions, rules, and discipline
  2. Public speaking - every day in your class you will need to be able to speak and present information to your students, practice speech, and practice fluency of language and talking in front of others
  3. The subject you plan to teach - become a master of the subject you plan to teach, make sure you know as much as possible and learn as much as you can about the subject you plan to teach. Take as many classes as possible in this subject and learn everything you can about it.
  4. Psychology & Human Development - start reading books and research articles on human development and psych. It will be helpful for you to know how people learn at different stages and the best ways to teach them at these stages (depending on stage of development and schema).


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David’s Answer

Museum work is out there. Good luck.

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