13 answers

Are online colleges as good as normal colleges?

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I am considering going to an online college. #college #college-major #college-selection

13 answers

Steve’s Answer

Updated

I'd say it depends on your learning style, your discipline, and your personal circumstances. Clearly on line has the advantage of flexibility, no need to travel etc, however, you lose the benefit of direct face to face interaction and the impetus/momentum generated with colleagues on the same course. You should also assess the quality of the institutions you are approaching (be they on line or campus) - these days its not just the type and grade of qualification, it's also about where you get the qualification.

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Mark’s Answer

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HI!

I would tend to agree with Steve. There is a lot you can learn on-line (no doubt!), but there is also a lot that a normal college also provides. For some people, it is the first time they have had to do laundry! It made a nice transition (for me at least) between being at home and being completely on my own... you get cooking in the dorm!

You also have to show up and communicate with others... learn to get to class on time... and manage all the "other things" that you often times take for granted being at home.

If online is the only (or most practical) option... go for it! But there is a reason a lot of people go to college... and "surviving" the experience show a lot of life skills that tend to translate to work as well...

Best of luck with either choice!

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Adil’s Answer

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Online education: A benefit to taking online courses is that they offer flexibility to the student. This is a great option for those who already have a time commitment with family and work. Online classes will mold with your schedule—log in to your online course at a time that works best for you as opposed to having to attend a lecture at a specific time. Traditional education: This option is best for those who have a little more time in their schedule. Even if you’re hoping for a little flexibility, on-campus courses typically offer day and evening schedules so you can coordinate with your daily commitments. One thing you’ll need to remember to factor in is where you live and work in proximity to the campus.

Online vs. traditional education: discipline

Online education: Being an online student will work well for those who have the ability to self-motivate. Without a plan or some type of organization, your work will suffer in the online classroom, but if you set deadlines and prioritize your school schedule, you should see success. Traditional education: A traditional on-campus setting is probably best for you, if you know you need discipline to get work completed. This method will give you the support and will to complete assignments and tasks on a daily basis.

Samantha’s Answer

Updated

Some online colleges are accredited and hold the same degree requirements as brick-and-mortar college. If you do choose an online college, be very sure that you carefully look at their certificates and be sure that the degrees are legitimate. One thing that brick-and-mortar colleges give you that online colleges don't is a the experience. You are able to figure out who you are and where you fit in in the world. About 80% of college students in the U.S. change their major at least once and the average is three times over the course of their college career. College is a great way to find out who you are, what you like and dislike, what where you want to go in life. All of that being said, sometimes life requires that you take a different path to get where you want to be. I applaud you for wanting to further your education. An undergraduate degree has become the minimum requirement for getting a great job. If that means you have to do it at a credible online university because that's your only option, then you rock your education and get that degree!

N’s Answer

Updated

Online colleges and traditional ones have the same goals in mind: to provide students with an education and award degrees. Although their purposes are the same, they have significant differences. A key distinction between online and traditional colleges is the Internet-based curriculum. According to the National Center for Education Statistics, an online class is defined as "a formal education process in which the students and instructor are not in the same place." This means that all exams, lectures and much of the reading in online classes are done on the Web. This is the biggest change when transitioning from traditional classroom learning. Many students have overcome the challenge of online instruction and have adapted well to the system. As in traditional courses, online ones are taught by instructors and include multiple classmates. However, your correspondence with these individuals will most likely be via email, telephone or live chat. Unless you are in a certain course or program that requires on-campus visits or clinical work—such as nursing or occupational therapy—you will never meet your instructors or classmates face to face. Traditional college classes require your physical presence as you listen and take notes during professors' lectures. Many traditional college classes make attendance mandatory and your grade suffers if you miss class. Exchanging information with your professors is very different in online classes from how it's done in traditional ones. In order to ensure that material has been presented clearly, instructors in a virtual environment have to provide more detailed feedback than do their colleagues at bricks and mortar campuses. According to the Sloan Consortium, there are additional types of feedback that are important to online classes, such as interaction in discussions that goes beyond posting words such as "good job," instead highlighting key ideas and creating follow-up questions. Feedback can also come in the form of audio clips and voice-supported chats. The best online instructors work hard to provide valuable assistance and interaction with their students. Online classes provide more flexibility than do traditional ones, making them more convenient for many students. Online classes allow you to attend school but also work, so you can fulfill all your important obligations. This has been the answer to many people's quest to further their education while still meeting their family and work responsibilities. In most cases, you can attend class when it's a good time for you and learn at your own pace. Not many traditional college students can say that about their schedules.

akshay’s Answer

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“Each student learns differently and in today's era of increasing technology, the question will not be whether to offer classes online, but rather how to implement them,” There are several options when it comes to online or traditional education degrees. The platform offers everything from certificates and diplomas to more advanced degree options such as an associate or bachelor’s degree.

With constant changes in technology from all different degree programs, both online and traditional type of education impacts differently to a student.

One of the key components to consider when weighing the options is the amount of time you have everyday to work on your degree. Are you willing and able to attend college full-time or do you need more flexibility for your busy schedule?

Something else to consider while weighing your college options is how much you can discipline yourself. Do you need structure in order to be a successful student? Do you need a running to-do list every day to checks things off as you go? If so, an online degree may be a great pathway for you.

One final area to consider is if you need a classroom experience that provides one-on-one communication for success. Do you need interaction from your peers and instructors to succeed? Or are you possibly someone who can thrive in an independent study environment?

Ayan’s Answer

Updated

Online colleges and traditional ones have the same goals in mind: to provide students with an education and award degrees. Although their purposes are the same, they have significant differences. A key distinction between online and traditional colleges is the Internet-based curriculum. An online class is defined as "a formal education process in which the students and instructor are not in the same place." This means that all exams, lectures and much of the reading in online classes are done on the Web. This is the biggest change when transitioning from traditional classroom learning. Many students have overcome the challenge of online instruction and have adapted well to the system.

As in traditional courses, online ones are taught by instructors and include multiple classmates. However, your correspondence with these individuals will most likely be via email, telephone or live chat. Unless you are in a certain course or program that requires on-campus visits or clinical work—such as nursing or occupational therapy—you will never meet your instructors or classmates face to face. Traditional college classes require your physical presence as you listen and take notes during professors' lectures. Many traditional college classes make attendance mandatory and your grade suffers if you miss class.

Exchanging information with your professors is very different in online classes from how it's done in traditional ones. In order to ensure that material has been presented clearly, instructors in a virtual environment have to provide more detailed feedback than do their colleagues at bricks and mortar campuses. There are additional types of feedback that are important to online classes, such as interaction in discussions that goes beyond posting words such as "good job," instead highlighting key ideas and creating follow-up questions. Feedback can also come in the form of audio clips and voice-supported chats. The best online instructors work hard to provide valuable assistance and interaction with their students.

Online classes provide more flexibility than do traditional ones, making them more convenient for many students. Online classes allow you to attend school but also work, so you can fulfill all your important obligations. This has been the answer to many people's quest to further their education while still meeting their family and work responsibilities.

In most cases, you can attend class when it's a good time for you and learn at your own pace. Not many traditional college students can say that about their schedules.

Mohana’s Answer

Updated

I would say to get the Fulfillment of Pursuing education in college it is better to attend regular classes Online classes gives to less practical knowledge It is better to attend regular college and interaction with People also gives to Best lessons of Life and caareer Growth

Joanne’s Answer

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I have had the opportunity to experience both through my job and find that it truly depends on your situation at the time. When i was younger i enjoyed the live face to face interaction with an instructor and other students. As my job and my personal life got a little more complicated and busy the online program suited my needs better for that time period. One thing to remember, however, for ANY online interactions. The WRITTEN word can be very tricky and taken out of context based on how you use it. When you are live and in person everyone can see your expression and have a better feel for what you are trying to express. Good luck in whatever you decide to pursue.

GHEUDE’s Answer

Updated

great online but some oto consolidated

Tejashree’s Answer

Updated

One of the key components to consider when weighing the options is the amount of time you have everyday to work on your degree. Are you willing and able to attend college full-time or do you need more flexibility for your busy schedule?

Online education: A benefit to taking online courses is that they offer flexibility to the student. This is a great option for those who already have a time commitment with family and work. Online classes will mold with your schedule—log in to your online course at a time that works best for you as opposed to having to attend a lecture at a specific time. Being an online student will work well for those who have the ability to self-motivate. Without a plan or some type of organization, your work will suffer in the online classroom, but if you set deadlines and prioritize your school schedule, you should see success. Interactions with instructors and peers will still happen as an online student. It just happens to be through online video instead. Learning through online video can help you to focus more on independently learning and your classes may even go quicker without some of the distractions of a traditional classroom education

Traditional education: This option is best for those who have a little more time in their schedule. Even if you’re hoping for a little flexibility, on-campus courses typically offer day and evening schedules so you can coordinate with your daily commitments. One thing you’ll need to remember to factor in is where you live and work in proximity to the campus.

A traditional on-campus setting is probably best for you, if you know you need discipline to get work completed. This method will give you the support and will to complete assignments and tasks on a daily basis. Traditional education is better for those who need face-to-face communication. When you don't have direct interactions with your instructors, you may tend to do not as well with the work you already have. If this is the case for you, success will come with a traditional education setting.

The decision is yours At the end of the day, it’s your decision on how to earn your college degree. Hopefully these side-by-side comparisons gave you a better outlook at the college degree plan that is right for you.

Before you dive into a degree, be sure to research whether online or traditional education is the best fit for you. If they both sound like a winning formula,

Adin’s Answer

Updated

Hi Rachel,

I wouldn't recommend an online college if you are not working, I would highly recommend you to study in a regular college as that would give a better value to your degree and also I feel it's more interactive. I went to an online college as I did my graduation late and also I was working and I didn't have time to attend a regular college. The other options that you have got if you are working, you can try an evening regular college, provided that you will be able to manage both work and college on the same day. There are some evening colleges where you do not have regular classes, they usually have classes on alternate days, you can also look for a regular college that functions on the weekend If you do not work i recommend you to go to a regular college

Deb’s Answer

Updated

Online colleges and traditional ones have the same goals in mind: to provide students with an education and award degrees. Although their purposes are the same, they have significant differences. A key distinction between online and traditional colleges is the Internet-based curriculum. According to the National Center for Education Statistics, an online class is defined as "a formal education process in which the students and instructor are not in the same place." This means that all exams, lectures and much of the reading in online classes are done on the Web. This is the biggest change when transitioning from traditional classroom learning. Many students have overcome the challenge of online instruction and have adapted well to the system. As in traditional courses, online ones are taught by instructors and include multiple classmates. However, your correspondence with these individuals will most likely be via email, telephone or live chat. Unless you are in a certain course or program that requires on-campus visits or clinical work—such as nursing or occupational therapy—you will never meet your instructors or classmates face to face. Traditional college classes require your physical presence as you listen and take notes during professors' lectures. Many traditional college classes make attendance mandatory and your grade suffers if you miss class. Exchanging information with your professors is very different in online classes from how it's done in traditional ones. In order to ensure that material has been presented clearly, instructors in a virtual environment have to provide more detailed feedback than do their colleagues at bricks and mortar campuses. According to the Sloan Consortium, there are additional types of feedback that are important to online classes, such as interaction in discussions that goes beyond posting words such as "good job," instead highlighting key ideas and creating follow-up questions. Feedback can also come in the form of audio clips and voice-supported chats. The best online instructors work hard to provide valuable assistance and interaction with their students. Online classes provide more flexibility than do traditional ones, making them more convenient for many students. Online classes allow you to attend school but also work, so you can fulfill all your important obligations. This has been the answer to many people's quest to further their education while still meeting their family and work responsibilities. In most cases, you can attend class when it's a good time for you and learn at your own pace. Not many traditional college students can say that about their schedules.