Skip to main content
5 answers
4
Asked 370 views Translate

What opportunities does a master's degree in marine biology present?

I am a student in high school approaching college where I will be studying marine biology. I am passionate about the field and looking for what kinds of careers it can open up. I am additionally very inclined to areas involving mathematics, technology and engineering. #computer-engineer #career #high-school-students #medicine #engineering #mathematics

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

4

5 answers


0
Updated Translate

James’s Answer

Hi Rachel,

While I'm not by any means an expert in marine biology, your question jumped out at me because my 11 year old daughter is also passionate about becoming a Marine Biologist. She obviously has quite a long way to go before getting to your position (she's about to enter middle school), but I will show her your post as an inspiration. :) We live fairly near to the Baltimore Aquarium, and visiting that is her favorite thing to do.

It's a pretty varied career, and you can follow many different paths depending on your interest, from working directly in the ocean, to working at an aquarium, to teaching at a university, to working at a research center. My own daughter is a somewhat nervous of the ocean (I think that will change), so she wanted to know if she could work largely on land (which she absolutely can).

I encourage all my kids to look for a career in something they will love, not just something that will pay the bills. This falls very much in that category, and I hope you both achieve your dreams, and find out more about our fascinating biosphere.

Good luck!
James
0
0
Updated Translate

Matthew’s Answer

Hi Rachel!

Receiving a concentration in Data Science will translate not only to Marine Biology but many, many other industries as well. The evolution of technology has brought us to a place where we have an infinite amount of data. The ability to collect data and the cost to store it doesn't require much thought. The demand for people that know how to make sense of data and to draw stories and conclusions from the collection of that data is growing and will continue to do so. Artificial Intelligence requires data scientists and any industry I can think of can leverage this capability to their advantage. As it relates to Marine Biology, I'd presume that will grow in demand, as well, taking into consideration the effects of climate change on it.

I really encourage your focus on these two concentrations since they'll play a huge role in our future world.

Thanks,
Matt
0
0
Updated Translate

Douglas’s Answer

Hi,
In your question you stated that you are approaching collage and "will" be studying Marine Biology. That being the case, you have already been accepted at a school that offers Marine Biology as a major. I suggest that your get the first 2 years of your studies "under your belt' before you definitely decide on which branch of Marine Biology you want to specialize in and ultimately get a job in. During those first 2 years you will meet people in the field and you will see first hand what the opportunities are that interest you. Do not be too quick in picking a specific area of any field. After your first 2 years, you will become much better informed and be able to focus on summer intern positions that will greatly aid you in your search for a specific area and what it will take for you to get a job in that area. For now, focus on doing very well in college .

In the mean time, arrange to take a tour of Woods Hole Oceanographic, if you have not already done so: https://www.whoi.edu/

Good Luck,

Doug
0
0
Updated Translate

Mark’s Answer

Hi Rachel!

The term "marine biologist" covers a lot of ground. Meaning it's kind of a catch all phrase. Marine biologist is a very general term that encompasses pretty much anyone on a professional level who studies or works with things that live in saltwater. For example, everything from fish, crustaceans, sponges, seaweed, coral, seals and other sea creatures including tiny microbes and plankton.

As a marine biologist you might work in the field which would mean possibly on a boat or submerged vessel or you might simply work in a lab checking & documenting samples, etc.

Hope this helps!
Mark
0
0
Updated Translate

Shawn’s Answer

Based upon my observations of hiring decisions, Master’s degrees are almost an essential today. I graduated with a Master’s in the early 90’s when a Master’s made you standout. In the last 10 years, I have seen the vast majority of hires are engineers with a Master’s. It is basically becoming the norm for all recent graduates.

Personally, I went after a Master’s not for employability. It was an internal desire to learn more that drove my desire for a Master’s.
0