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is it better to stay in your own state for college or to go somewhere else

#out-of-state

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Doc’s Answer

Trevaire the most notable difference is the tuition fees that you would have to pay. You might end up paying a lot more if you are going to attend an out of state campus. The fees for in states student is comparatively lower. To be more specific the tuition fees for out states candidate is almost double the amount paid by in-state candidates. Attending a college or university in your home state can be a great way to save money for the future, and that’s not a bad thing. But this doesn’t mean you should compromise your dreams purely to attend a cheaper in-state school. However, the concept of in-state tuition fees is only applicable for public universities, for private universities the fee structures are the same regarless of where your from in the world. Focus on finding the colleges that fit you first Trevaire, out-of-state colleges can improve your chances of finding your “perfect match.”

Staying close to home is another benefit of attending a state school. Having the option of driving home for the weekend to see family and friends is a factor that some students might not consider that big of a deal when choosing a college. However, being a few miles away from your family can be great—not just for free food and laundry but also comfort and support when you need it. However, moving out of state for college can better prepare you for the challenges of the “real world.”

Going to college away from home is the perfect opportunity to experience a little of “grown-up life” before it actually comes. The decision to stay in state or go out of state for college depends on a multitude of factors: personal finances, preference, career goals, and more. While it may seem like you can have only one or the other, many schools offer programs where you can study at different universities or satellite campuses, similar to study abroad programs but without students actually leaving the country. If you’re still having trouble deciding, look into whether the schools you’re considering offer such programs – you may just be able to have the best of both worlds. At the end of the day, attending college will be a transformative and exciting experience regardless of where you end up living.

Hope this helps Trevaire
Thank you comment icon Thank You Liz. “The unselfish effort to bring cheer to others will be the beginning of a happier life for ourselves.” — Helen Keller Doc Frick
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Melisa’s Answer

Hi Trevaire,

What a thoughtful question. You have a couple of great answers already and yes, depends on what your needs and wants are.

As someone from Chicago, I can share from my experience attending college out of state for a couple of years. I then completed my degree back in IL. For me, the top positives of going out of state were:
1. Meeting new people, making life long friends and experiencing a new area of the Midwest and a college that was still close enough for me to drive home when I needed to. Also, meeting professors and fellow students with a different perspective from mine.
2. Ability to expand my network and job opportunities, as I worked out of state for a few years after college too.
3. For me, I felt I did the most growing during my out-of-state years because I had to be independent.

Some challenges of going to school out of state were:
1. It was a little more costly than staying in state.
2. I missed my family when I couldn't just go home for the weekend, since I was several hours away.
3. If I was sick or had any emergencies come up, I had to rely on my roommate or friends at school since I didn't have family near by.

I also have two daughters who recently finished college. One stayed in IL and one went out of state. The one who went out of state really loved her experience in Michigan and like me, I feel she grew so independent during that time. In her case, her tuition, with scholarships, etc. actually ended up being less than the schools she was looking at in state.

So it all depends on your individual needs and resources you have available to you. It's good you are asking the question now and take time to evaluate before you make any big decisions.

Best wishes to you in your educational and career goals!

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James Constantine’s Answer

Hello Trevaire,

Should You Pursue College Education in Your Home State or Venture Out?

The choice between studying in your home state or exploring opportunities elsewhere is a pivotal one, impacting your academic journey, personal growth, and future career. To make this decision, you must weigh various factors such as financial implications, academic prospects, social experiences, and personal inclinations.

Financial Implications:

A key factor in your decision-making process is the financial aspect. Studying in-state at public universities is usually less expensive due to subsidies for residents, making education more affordable. Opting for an out-of-state college could raise your expenses with higher tuition fees, accommodation costs, and other related charges. However, don't forget to explore financial aid, scholarships, and potential career prospects that could balance the increased costs of studying out-of-state.

Academic Prospects:

The range of academic opportunities offered by colleges both in and out of your state is another vital consideration. Some out-of-state colleges might provide distinctive programs, specialized majors, or research possibilities unavailable in your home state. If your academic interests or career ambitions align better with an out-of-state institution, it could be worthwhile to venture out. Plus, exposure to diverse teaching methods, viewpoints, and resources at out-of-state colleges can enrich your learning experience and widen your perspective.

Social Experiences:

The social dimension of college life plays a significant role in your decision. Studying in your home state keeps you close to family and friends, offers a sense of familiarity, and could save on travel expenses during holidays. Conversely, studying out-of-state can foster personal development, independence, and cultural exposure by introducing you to a new environment, diverse individuals, and expanding your network beyond your home state.

Personal Inclinations:

In the end, your decision should reflect your personal goals, values, and preferences. Consider elements like distance from home, campus atmosphere, local climate, college size, extracurricular activities, and how well the institution fits your academic and lifestyle preferences. Campus visits, conversations with current students and alumni, and thorough research on each college's offerings can guide you towards a decision that best fits your unique needs and ambitions.

Conclusion:

To sum up, the choice between studying in your home state or elsewhere hinges on a multitude of factors unique to you. It's crucial to balance the financial implications, academic prospects, social experiences, and personal inclinations before deciding on a path that aligns with your educational and personal objectives.

Top 3 Credible Sources Referenced in this Discussion:

U.S. News & World Report
The College Board
National Association for College Admission Counseling (NACAC)

These reputable sources are known for their reliable information on college education trends, admission procedures, financial aid options, and academic opportunities, aiding students in making informed higher education decisions.

May God bless you!
James Constantine Frangos.
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Robin’s Answer

Trevaire,

The answer to your question is "it depends". It depends on a number of things such as your financial situation, your family situation and your major. In state is often a good option because you don't have to pay a higher out of state tuition. However, if you can get a scholarship that allows you to attend a school out of state, that would normally be out of reach financially, then going out of state may be a good option. Your major may not be offered in a specific state so that can also be a factor. So, there are a number of things to consider, you just have to find the right combination for you.
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Frank’s Answer

I would apply to both as there are advantages to each of these options. For schools that are in the same State, you have the lower cost of tuition and you can sometimes leverage living at home and commuting to school. When you go away to school or live on campus in the same State, you have a better opportunity for personal development. I would also consider using your summers starting Senior year in high school to get some of your General Education classes taken at a local Community College so that you can complete your undergraduate degree faster and at a lower overall cost.
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