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What are some practical ways to know if a job position is a good fit for me?

The jump from college (or school in general) to a career is a big step. #resume #interviews #professional-development #corporate

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Subject: Career question for you

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Judy Lynn’s Answer

Hi Brandon,

I totally empathize with you. I felt the same way when I just graduated from college and had to start working - it's definitely a big leap!

One good way to know if a job is a good fit for you is to first have some experience in that job. We don't know what we don't know, and we are unable to judge if the job is a good fit until you've tried it and you can reflect on whether you see yourself doing work in this field for some years. The good thing about being young like you is that you have the advantage to take risks until you find what aligns with your passion, goals, and your principles.

Once you start working in a company, you will be surprised at how a whole new world opens up for you. The "best fit" may not be in your entry-level job, but if you're curious enough and explore enough, you'll find something that aligns with the things I mentioned and will then target that for your next career move.

All the best!
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Jenny’s Answer

So glad you asked this question! To me, I think it's super important to just write down what you value. There are so many different job types, functions, and positions out there, but if you don't know what you like or what you value, then you'll be a product of a position vs. a part of a culture or path that you actually value/enjoy. Here is how I did this early on to help guide myself:

1. I asked - what are the things I won't compromise on when it comes to working? Was it that I needed a team environment? Was it that I needed remote work options? Was it that I needed a supportive manager? Was it that I needed to LOVE what I did every day? I had to think through the things I could not live without.

2. Then I asked myself, what do I enjoy doing? Is it helping others? Is it problem-solving? Is it being creative? I looked for jobs that would help scratch that itch every day. You'd be surprised how many different job opportunities pop up when you focus on principles vs. function.

3. Finally - I mentored a lot of people. I think it's important to hear from regular people what the day-to-day work looks and feels like in a position you may be interested in. Places like career village are fantastic to ask about specific day-to-day work in any position you're curious about. Talk to others, take the risk to ask questions, and don't be afraid to ask them to tell you the good, bad, and ugly of their situation.

My final piece of advice is that you also don't have to have it all figured out. You can always change your mind, you can always change your career path. This is your one and precious life, do whatever you want with it, and don't be afraid to fail fast and get right back up and out there again.
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Katy’s Answer

Is it a field you want to be in? You will be spending a great deal of time at the job so you want to be sure that when you wake up in the morning you are excited and energized about where you are going.


Take a look at the companies mission statement. See if it aligns with your core values. Do your research and talk to anyone you know who might work there.


Check Glassdoor to get the scoop on what past and present employees think of the company.


In the interview, look around you at other employee's and the ambiance. Do they look like they are happy to be there? Are their pictures or decorations in cubes? All of this can be key indicators of the work environment. Ask your interviewer what they like best about working there.


Ask your potential manager what their management style is? Are they Micro, Macro, Participative? Ask them what the team is like, what challenges they face, and if you can, figure out how retention is at the company.

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Kristin’s Answer

Do your research and make sure you come prepared for your interview to ask questions. See if you have anyone from your network that works at that company to give you insight.
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Georgina’s Answer

Brandon you would want to make sure you do some reaserch, never be afraid to ask questions. Make sure that you have a sense of passion for the job/career you are planning to take on.
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Richard’s Answer

Sometimes you just have to take a chance. Life's too short and you may never know if it is or isn't what you want. My advise is if you're interested, give it an honest shot. You miss 100% of the chances you don't take. You'll always learn and grow through experience and resilience at the very least and you'll be better for it.



Best of luck.

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Paul’s Answer

Are you excited to do the job? Do you see yourself doing the work? Can you see yourself fulfilling the job requirements? Can you see yourself working for your prospective boss? Does the company have a good reputation and a leader in the market? It is growing? Do you respect the leaders at the top?


Be sure to do your due diligence connecting with people who work there. See if you can talk with the person who had or has the position currently. Think of anything you can do to know as much as you can about what you will be doing and the environment you will be working in. And then network with anyone that can give you an inside track to give you a competitive edge a true perspective.


I hope this helps.

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Courtney’s Answer

Do your research! Does the company share the same values as you. For example, if supporting the community is important to you, look at the company's CSR strategy. Ask questions - don't be afraid to ask as many questions as needed for you to make sure it's a good fit. Lastly, connect with others at the company to get feedback. Networking is key.

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