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What are things to consider when choosing a major

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Subject: Career question for you

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Mariana’s Answer

Andres,

In my opinion, the most important thing to consider when choosing a major is knowing what compliments your personality the best. It is often easy to lead towards a major with higher income, however, this is not necessarily the key to success. Applying your personality to the correct major can define the future success of your professional career. For example, if you tend to be an extrovert that enjoys social settings, thrives around people, and is not afraid of risks, the majors you are most likely to succeed in is business, sales, marketing, or advertising. If your personality is of an introvert, and you are more reflective, prefer alone time, and prefer to write other than talk, the majors that you would likely succeed in are computer science, accounting, economics, or engineering. It is important to keep in mind that these majors can lead you to many different job opportunities/professions. Identify what you like and dislike within the major’s possible job opportunities and narrow down your options.
Good luck!
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Nick’s Answer

These are all great answers, Andres. Above all, choose something that interests you - you want to study and work in an area that excites you and brings you energy because you will then bring that energy to your work. Also, I agree with the others that you don't have to worry too much about choosing the exact right major the first time - you can change majors OR even change careers later on. For example, I started as a Policy Analysis major, switched to Nutritional Sciences, then got a job as a teacher and now am a technology product manager. The common thing to all these was that I felt passionate about the fields and that helped me be successful, then that success gave me the options to change.

That said, I would keep in the back of your head what the job options are for your major. You don't need to put too much pressure on finding the best paying job, but keep in mind that after college you'll need to find something that pays back those loans (if you have them).
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Doug’s Answer

Choose something you enjoy! Sometimes there are things you are good, or great at, but it doesn't mean you enjoy doing it. Unless you are set on a very specific career (e.g., a medical doctor), it is very common for people to end up in a career that they didn't major in. I majored in Communications, later went to Law School, and ended up working most of my career in Project Management and Operations for different industries (health care, insurance, and utility). There are several career assessments online that can help guide you. When there are so many choices to choose from, I encourage people to start crossing off things they don't want to do. I also encourage people to talk with people who work in the fields they are possibly interested in to get the real scoop on the job. Some careers sound awesome on paper but when you talk to people who have worked in the field for some time, they can can provide you the real experience that you don't get from job descriptions and textbooks.
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Rachel’s Answer

I agree with Doug, it is most important to pick something that makes you happy and interests you.

Something else to know is it is OK if you are unsure of your direction. You don't need to put so much pressure on picking the perfect degree from the start. If you go down one career path and decide it's not for you, you can pivot to a new path.

For example, I started as a chemistry major, moved over to psychology and then landed in marketing and graduated with my bachelor's degree in marketing. Plenty of flip flopping occurred during my college years.
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Amanda’s Answer

Hi Andres!

This a great question. I changed my major 3 times while I was in college before I finally figured out what I wanted to do. Definitely focus on areas that are interesting to you and that you enjoy doing. These could be broad topics like solving problems, working in teams or something very specific like chemistry or computer programming. You might also look at the job market to see what roles companies are recruiting for. You can find job opportunities on LinkedIn and other career sites. This will give you an idea of the skills that are required for the jobs that are out there.
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