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What are the perks of taking a 2 year community college then transferring to a university

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Julio’s Answer

Hey Victor!

There are many perks to going to a 2 year college and transferring to a 4 year university, but to give you the right advice, I would need to know more about your situation financially, socially, and educationally. Instead, I'll give you general advice that can hopefully still apply to you!

To begin, I want to say that not all 2 year colleges are community colleges, take for example Coe College or Boston College. Community college is a great choice if you are not receiving a lot of financial aid, since classes are very inexpensive and the fees regularly associated with a major college are non-existent at CC (community college), which saves you an incredible amount of money (keep in mind this is if you aren't getting great financial aid to go to a major school or four-year college for a full four years). Another perk is the increased amount of programs CC usually have; CC usually have way more specific majors, trade programs, and niche programs that many major universities simply cannot afford to run or don't have enough students to participate in. Finally, a perk that many advisors/counselors refuse to tell you is that a majority of the time CC has an easier and lighter workload than a major four year university, which means less stress, easier classes, and more time for you!

Now to the downsides of Community College; we can start off with the lack of amenities that they have, such as gyms, dorms, dining halls, athletic teams, clubs, and more. For some, that may not matter, but for others who dream of getting the "college experience", this can be a real downside for them. CC offers a great college experience, although it may not be in a traditional sense where you sleep on-campus, eat at the dining hall, and go to football games on weekends so keep that in mind. Another downside is related to one of the perks, the lighter workload perk; having a lighter workload is great, but you may feel really overwhelmed once you transfer to a 4 year university where professors are more strict, workload is much heavier, and you have classes that are concentrated in your specific major that you may feel impostor syndrome in.

My advice to you is find out your financial aid situation first, talk to your school counselor/advisor and figure out if you are getting good financial aid or not. If you are getting good financial aid, then there's no need to go into a community college first since you will have your dorm, meals, and amenities paid for which will add to your college experience (if you care about the "college experience", that is). If you aren't getting enough financial aid in your situation, then community college will definitely be a great option that will give you more time to explore what you want to do, give you more time to have fun and explore your interests, and most importantly save you a lot of money (in some circumstances, they may even pay you to go to school!).

Good Luck!
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Natalie’s Answer

Hi Victor!

I'm a community college graduate myself and I always highly recommend it to people. For starters, it usually costs much less than a university. So you'll spend a lot less money going there for two years first instead of going to a university for all four years. I personally didn't know what I wanted to major in when I graduated high school, and community college is a great place for that. I majored in general studies at first and I got to take a wide variety of classes to figure out what I was most interested in. That led me to realizing that I wanted to become a graphic designer, and I'm now at another school for that. College isn't for everyone, and community college also gives students a chance to experience what college is like before they spend a lot more money at a univeristy.
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Christy’s Answer

There are multiple perks to going to community college and then transferring to a university. The main perk is SAVING TUITION MONEY and still graduating with a degree from a four-year university. Another perk is that you do not have to stress as much in high school. You are not required to take the SAT or the ACT to get into a community college. You are more likely to get into your desired college through transferring than straight from high school. This is because universities are required to have a certain number of transfer students. From taking this path, you could have the same destination as a stressed straight-A high school student who pays twice as much money as you for college tuition.

That being said, general education classes at community colleges are usually easier to do because the professors are there more to teach than to do research. In some universities, professors do not teach very well because they are there to do research, but they have to teach in order to do their research. There are smaller class sizes, you can make connections with your professors easier. It is less stressful because there isn’t high competition in class. You can get more attention if you need it. Also, being in a community college gives you more exposure to people from different walks of life. Another advantage of going to a community college is that you will be closer to home if there are commitments that you need to fulfill.
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Angelina’s Answer

Hi Victor,
I think the main perk is that you get to save money if you do two years at CC and then transfer to a university. It also allows you to take your time to decide what you want to major in because it's very common to switch majors. That way, if you do end up switching majors, it isn't as costly. The drawback of going to a CC is that you don't get to have the freshman dorm experience. Also, when you transfer as a junior, it can be harder to make friends because most people have already formed their friend groups. All in all, the biggest advantages of going to a CC and then transferring are that you save a lot more money than if you went to a 4-year university.

Good luck!
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Edwin’s Answer

Hello Victor,

I would say you could always go to community college and then transfer to out. That is what I did and I would recommend taking a career guidance course, where you will learn so much about different career paths because there is no linear career path.

Also, when applying to schools the second time I felt more prepared and happy that I did not have to turn in my SAT or ACT test scores. However, I would recommend sending in your community college transcripts so there is enough time to make sure they get delivered.
Not to mention, I feel as though I was more prepared and mature during my sophomore year because you understand your academic goals. I would recommend applying for scholarships because you could save that money for when you have to transfer to your other school.

With that being said, there are also association degrees from community college and I would recommend pursuing them because you are already taking most of those courses.

Happy to help if you have any other questions!!

Warmly,
Edwin
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Erika’s Answer

Hi Victor, I took the community college route for a couple of reasons and so glad that I did. First, my mother couldn't afford to send me to a 4 year university right away, so a community college was the best financial decision for me at the time. Secondly, my grades were not as good as I needed to go to my top university choices. I also wasn't ready for the fasted paced university life. Lastly, I wanted to work and stay at home to save money to support having a car.

I followed a class path that was aligned with University that I wished to transfer to. I was focused and was able to graduate with honors which helped me get accepted into the better rated college within my choice University. I had options as a transfer student. I could have gone to the transfer dorm or find off campus housing. I choose off campus housing so I could be more independent but still stay with college students. This is also where I met my husband so I think it was fate.

I did feel like I missed out on the dorm experience since I never did it like my high school friends did. At the time I didnt care as it was not important to me, but now 20 years later I realize it. There was only 2 classes that the university would not accept, but all the others ones were accepted thankfully. Make sure you thoroughly discuss the classes with the University counselors you plan to transfer to. Also make sure you also thoroughly understand the transfer school's requirements are. I was so excited to get accepted into the better rated college within the university but I failed to realize that a minor was required and 2 additional classes were required. I had only followed the class path for the one college but didnt realize the other college had different requirements. NO biggie but I did have to complete an unexpected extra semester plus summer classes.

Overall, I highly recommend going to a community college first and then transferring. Best of luck in whatever decision you make.
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Brad’s Answer

The financials related to the cost difference might allow you to take more than the standard course load in the 2-year school. This will allow you to accelerate your college career at a faster than normal pace.
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Priya’s Answer

Hi Victor, I haven't done this myself but I did go to University during Fall and Spring semesters in my undergraduate degree, and do community college in the summers, along with dual classes in high school beforehand. Benefits that I have seen are that it is less expensive and some classes that are unnecessarily hard in University (like basic courses) can be easier in community college. I did my major-related classes at University, and saved languages, literature, and math courses for community college. That being said, I wish I had taken languages at university because we had more variety available at the University. Something helpful could be to check out the degree plan for the degree you may be considering and pick which ones you want to knock out at community college first if you decide to do that, and which ones you want to save for when you are at University. Also, if you are uncertain what degree you want to major in at University, exploring at community college seems like it could be a cheaper option! One con you may need to consider is taking *too* many classes at community college ahead of time. I had quite some credits from high school and community college, and by the end of my undergraduate degree I needed at least 12 hours to remain a full-time student, but I was getting close to hitting "excess hours." If you have "excess hours" you may need to pay an out-of-state tuition at University, which is much more than in-state tuition! That did give me some stress (and I hadn't known about it beforehand!) but I scraped by just in time! Just keep it in mind as food for thought and remember to make sure to consult an academic advisor from either a community college or university if possible for help =). Good luck, and you got this!
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Jasmine’s Answer

Hi Victor,

There are many perks in going to a community college for two years then transferring to a university. The benefits of going that route may be different depending on one's financial situation, interests, and personal reasons. Some major perks in going to community college include the price of taking courses at community college, not having the grades from high school to get into university, and having extra time to adjust to college level courses. Other perks are living at home (which saves lots of money), discovering the major that interests you most, smaller classes sizes, and much more. The benefits can and will be different for everyone, so it is up to you if going to community college is best for you.

Although there are many benefits, there are also many cons. Some cons include missing out on the "college experience", lack of amenities (dining hall, gym, dorms, clubs, etc.), and getting used to university courses before taking upper divisions. I personally wished I went to community college because the "college experience" and amenities were not as important to me. One thing I do appreciate about being in a university is that I was able to get a feel of the campus, course, and environment of my university before taking my upper divisions. I would say that you should understand your own situation and see what you value more before making the decision. Also remember that going to community college is not looked down on (which is a big reason why I did not go to community college). Good luck and I hope my advice helped you!
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