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Should you go to university or college if you are not sure what to study. It is so expensive.

Some of my friends know exactly what they want to study, many others do not. It is such a big decision to make, and post-secondary education is very expensive. Is it worth it? If I drop out of a program, I don't know what I'll do next. #career-counseling #career-path #undecided

Thank you comment icon Yes! College is a necessity and will provide many pivotal skills for life! Some sort of college is very important. Chad
Thank you comment icon Arianne! Having a college degree is crucial. I suggest you take some time to know what do you really like to study. You can ask yourself questions like: Do I like math and numbers? Do I like to draw? Do I like computers?Am I a social person or a secluded person? Do I like pets? Do I like to read and write? Do I like helping others?......These are just some of the questions that will help you decide what are you interested in. Certainly, deciding about what to study can be a challenge.But, this is a preliminary step to make you decide what do you want to do. It all depends on all your interests, hobbies, skills and so on. A college counselor can be a a great help. Yet, he or she will not tell you what to choose as a major since it is a private decision. Redouane
Thank you comment icon As for education spending, yes! college is expensive. But there are certain ways you can make your college expenses affordable. Here in the US for instance ( I am assuming Canada is the same). you may opt to start your associate degree in a community college then transfer to a college or a university after that. Apply for financial aid or scholarship is another alternative. The bottom line is that it is worth to experience the college life and eventually get a degree. Most importantly, take your time because at the end the decision is yours. Redouane

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Kerry’s Answer

I would encourage you to take some online career assessments to see if you could identify some potential career paths or clusters. You may want to seek out some assistance from services at an Employment Ontario centre in Toronto where they can give you some assistance on post secondary choices. There are pluses and minuses to both; do your homework. It is a huge investment so you should do what you can to find out what the labour market looks like for people who graduate from programs. Schools aren't always the best to give that information. Once you have an idea of what you might want to do, call some employers and ask what type of education they would like to see from a potential candidate. It may seem like a lot of upfront work, but it will save you time and money in the long run than going into something you don't absolutely love! Best of luck!

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Nathan’s Answer

While it's good practice to have a bit of an idea where you might like to go with your degree, university/college is an opportunity to get outside of your comfort zone and explore many different options. Most people I know changed their mind about what they wanted to do for a career from the time they started their degree to the time that they finished.


In addition, you have so many opportunities available to you while you are in school that you may not have access to otherwise. Try volunteering at different places on campus, go to the campus career centre and learn about opportunities through them, join student clubs or organizations. These are all ways to better determine your interests and if you would really enjoy working in a certain career field rather than just attending classes alone.


University/college can absolutely be expensive, so if you decide to go then make the best of the opportunities available to you while you are attending school.

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Jimil’s Answer

Attending university or college can be a significant investment, both financially and in terms of time and effort. If you are unsure about what to study, it may be helpful to consider the following:

Consider alternative options: There are many options available for post-secondary education, including vocational programs, apprenticeships, and trade schools that may provide more hands-on training and quicker entry into the workforce. Researching and considering these options might help you to identify a path that aligns better with your interests and skills

Explore your interests: Take the time to explore your interests and discover what you're passionate about. This can help you make a more informed decision about what to study and give you a better chance of success.

Take advantage of the opportunities: Even if you're not sure what you want to study, university or college can provide you with opportunities to explore different fields, gain new skills, and develop your interests.

Don't be afraid of change: Your interests, goals, and priorities may change throughout your college or university experience, and it is normal to switch majors or even schools. Don't hesitate to make changes if you feel that it is the best move for you.

Seek guidance: Speak with academic advisors or career counselors to help you explore different options and understand the long-term benefits of various educational paths. They can assist you in finding the right balance between your personal goals and the financial investment.

Evaluate the cost: Make sure you understand the cost of attending the school, what financial aid options are available, and what your potential earning potential is after completing the program.

Ultimately, whether or not to attend university or college is a personal decision that will depend on your individual circumstances and goals. If you're unsure about what to study or where to go, take the time to research different options and speak with people who can provide guidance and advice. If you are struggling with this decision, consider seeking help from a career counselor or academic advisor, they can help you to make a more informed decision and help you see the big
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Lucia Valeria’s Answer

Hi Arianne,
In my personal experience, the first year of university teaches you general courses that could help you in defining your next steps.
It´s an different experience that you shouldn´t let go.

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Joan’s Answer

If you're not sure, try some courses at your local community college. It's much cheaper and usually transfer to whatever university you eventually end up at (make sure you ask around about transferring credits to another college before signing up).


I have friends that spent a few years at a community college getting their base courses out of the way for a cheaper price before transferring to a more expensive college to finish their degree. This also lets you try a couple of potential majors and figure out what you might like to have a career in.

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Jenna’s Answer

When I was in college, I struggled with the cost and worked multiple jobs while a full time student. And I times I questioned the value of so much personal effort. And then I read a quote that inspired me, and made me think of my time in school differently. John Dewey wrote that "Education is not preparation for life, education is life itself." I then thought through what I was gaining in my time at school and evaluated those benefits not in terms of a return on the investment but of who I was becoming as a person. It helped me gain perspective and I finished my degree. That was just my journey, but I do recommend thinking through your own decisions as who you want to be, not just what you want to do.
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Simeon’s Answer

There are certificates for tech jobs that you can get online and trade jobs such as plumber, electrician, HVAC, or welder that you could get as well. Make sure that if you choose not to do college that you have another career path in mind.
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