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What are some things to expect when trying to become a phlebotomist?

#Phlebotomy #Phlebotomist #Med #Nursing

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Shannon’s Answer

1 - never forget to wear protective equipment.
2 - beware of your reaction to blood. i've never been grossed out, but in college i did pass out & fall on the floor watching someone draw blood. big surprise to me b/c i thought i had no problem seeing this kind of thing. good thing i got over it fast.
3 - never set your needle down, always put it into a sharps container right away.
4 - the most rewarding thing i did in that job was to nail a blood draw from a cancer patient. she had way too many needles in her life but i got her, painlessly, on the first try. aim for that every time. (not bragging - God gave me the skill)
5 - you'll have to practice in order to become proficient. at first you use a rubber fake arm. then you use your classmates'. be nice to them always b/c they use yours right back.
6 - hospital phlebs often start work at 5:30 am so the test results are ready for the doctors to see by 7 am.
7 - if you also have EGK certification, and are a CNA/MA, you'll be able to qualify for a lot of jobs in offices & hospitals.
Thank you comment icon Thanks for the advice. Brandy
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Tailor’s Answer

As a phlebotomist expect not only to draw blood but expect to process. For example at outpatient settings you most likely will deal with specimen like urine and feces. You will be using the centrifuge and you will be separating serum/plasma. However at a hospital like ascension you may only draw people all throughout your shift with no processing because they have a lab that does it.
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Stacey’s Answer

To become a phlebotomist, you will be in a program for several months possibly a year depending on which program you take. You will have courses in anatomy, medical terminology, and physiology. You will have both classroom didactic and hands-on training. I highly encourage you to make sure your program is accredited and you become certified. Usually, this will get you ahead in the job realm. You can then work in various settings, such as blood donation centers, clinics, hospitals, lab centers, etc.
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Justin’s Answer

Depending on the course you take, the lecture may be too quick and tiring to consistently follow. However, this is not a problem as that subject is relatively digestible and easier to study. In my experience, I took an accelerated course which completed the lectures in 5 weeks (learning only on the weekends). I was barely able to follow the lectures but a week before the NCCT exam, I used many sites and the given textbook to test my memory on test tubes, medical terminologies, patient identification, etc. I used a site called NimblePrep and only used the free questions (my suggestion is to do all of the 1000+ questions if available for free and continually do the same questions multiple times a day for many days or until you feel confident). You should also do the given practice questions by the course and find patterns that you may see in the textbook to classify different test tubes.

For the lab portion, we were told to start drawing blood from each other on the first day (under the professional supervision of course). This was the most nerve-racking part but if you carefully watch the demonstrations, it becomes a lot easier. Focus on being good at finding veins from multiple people and don't be afraid to troubleshoot as long as you do it properly and the patient allows you to do so.

Overall, the learning isn't hard. I wouldn't say it is easy so that you don't make the mistake of not studying. Make sure to study hard and practice at least a week before the exam. The physical blood draw assessment is a lot easier than the NCCT exam.

If you have any questions or trouble with documents and how labs/lectures work, push and advocate for yourself. Ask questions from your professionals and feel free to ask me any other specific questions.

Justin recommends the following next steps:

The NCCT exam isn't too hard. But study hard. Study a lot for at least a week so that you wouldn't have to take the NCCT the second time.
If you have any questions or trouble with documents and how labs/lectures work, push and advocate for yourself. Ask questions from your professionals and feel free to ask me any other specific questions.
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