2 answers

Which age group is the easiest to work with while working as a career counselor?

Asked Baltimore, Maryland

I'm interested in working with teens and adults as these age groups are more likely to be working than the elderly but also am looking to have a well rounded client base. #career-counseling #counseling

2 answers

Daniela’s Answer

Updated State of Goiás, State of Goiás, Brazil

Mounia,

In my opinion, the younger the age, the greater the ease of change and consequently the counseling.

As we grow older, we accumulate many experiences, life stories and knowledge. For this reason, change becomes tougher, more difficult, but it is not impossible.

On the other hand, when we are younger (as in the case of children and adolescents), we are more vulnerable to change, because we do not have so much knowledge yet and experience of life. In this way, this public tends to accept advice and change more easily.

In any case, counseling the senior public is also a very interesting and innovative activity, since many adults have shown a greater willingness and motivation to test new activities in life, such as learning a new language, planning a trip abroad, making a New college, and even pursue new professional challenges.

That is all. Reflect on the tips and good luck!

Updated
Thank you very much for your concise answer!

Marjorie A.’s Answer

Updated Rockville, Maryland

Hi Mounia,

Enthusiasm is the key. So any age group, elementary/middle school/high school/young+ adults who have an interest in learning about careers can make the process much easier for the provider. Each group has different needs in career development, so be cognizant of this in your delivery.

For example, young children are open to new ideas and want to pursue every exciting career. They are introduced to careers through various exploration activities; such as, modeling by their parents or others they respect, hobbies, and visuals. Middle school students can develop career options in similar ways but they start to broaden their options due to exposure and personal/social/academic maturation. Many MS students take career interest inventories/aptitude tests in their schools and begin career projects in classes or hobbies, such as scouts. High school students are continuing to crystallize their ambitions due to ES and MS exploration. Again, more exposure with HS projects, hobbies, academic introductions, summer enrichment programs, internships and awareness through mentors and technology formulate their choices. They also take career aptitude tests and are exposed to career programs at school through Naviance or Choices/Bridges.

Of course young and older adults will base their choices on life experiences and the urgency of a career change. The changes could be voluntary or involuntary and their enthusiasm could be skewed by positive or negative beliefs, lack of confidence, unwillingness to adapt to change, and questionable motivation. Some may need more coaxing than the younger (ES/MS) population.

Very good question and hope this helps!!

Updated
This helps quite a bit! Thank you for the different perspective and concise answer!