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What is the toughest part in changing a job?

hi! I want to know about what hinder you in changing your profession into a new one? Do you change your job just because of your own preference or high salary? What is the greatest challenge when changing a new job/new profession? #job #financial-planning

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Charlie’s Answer

Changing a job is all about the first word. Change. Change is hard for many. To pickup and many times and leave a sure thing for something you hope is better. Reasons why to change?
Money - money is no doubt important. But don't pick a job for what it pays. Pick it because you love it and would do it for free if you could. Doing it for the money can lead to you feeling empty inside. The caveat to this though is the long term goal. Let's say your long term goal was to go sail the world. Well that takes money, so working a very lucrative job like a dog for a few years so you can enjoy your later years maybe worthwhile.


Location - many change jobs because they want to work up to working someplace specific. Perhaps that's being at the top of the field in New York or LA, or just enjoying the perks certain areas offer.


Advancement- many are set on becoming the best at what they do or reaching some goal. This many times means working someplace for a year or two and then moving up to somewhere else where they have new challenges and opportunities to learn more skills, and gain more experience.


Necessity- sometimes people change out of necessity. Perhaps they were downsized. Maybe their parent(s) need care and they move closer to home. Perhaps to be closer to kids?


The reasons can vary for many. My advice is to never change into a job that pays less. Never intentionally go unemployed to find another job. Always be willing to accept new responsibilities and go into jobs where you can expand your skill sets. This is where opportunity lies. Just because it might pay well, don't sell your integrity or do something solely for the money. Work because you love it. If you love it, you will have passion for it. Passion breeds excellence. Excellence brings rewards from your customers and your peers.

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Michael’s Answer

This is a tough question to answer since the reason to change jobs vary so much. If it's just changing jobs, but you are basically doing the same type of work, I would say it isn't as difficult as changing professions all together. Changing jobs requires experience and developing skills. People typically work for a few years before switching companies to a new job, but doing the same type of tasks. Usually this is for career progression to take on a larger role, potentially to become a manager, or for higher salary.


If you are planning on changing professions, as in doing something entirely new, it tends to be more difficult because no company wants to train someone who has no experience in the particular job. People usually do this because they are unhappy with what they do currently, looking for more career progression, they want more challenge, or they want a better salary.


In either case, changing your job or your profession is difficult because you already established yourself with your current company. Entering into a new company requires that you learn how they do things, adjusting to company culture, knowing where boundaries are and how to deal with new managers, etc. It might also mean that you have to move to different cities, which can add on stress. However, making the change is, of course, up to the person. They need to decide on whether the new job or profession is worth the adjustments in the first place and if she or he is willing to put in the effort to succeed at the new job.

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Andria’s Answer

I think change is hard for people in general and when you go from a job you know and like to a job of unknown is a huge challenge. I have changed jobs many times within the same company. mainly for career advancement and that has always meant more money. I think the hardest part is going to a job your super excited about because you just got a big raise but then you get into the job and you dont like it and you feel your not cut out for it. now how do you move to something else that will make you happier, pay cut? Or be miserable? I think asking a lot of questions about the new position and finding out as much as you can about it before jumping in is the best. Ask to job shadow wiht someone in the position and see what they do. this will help you make a good decision on moving forward or going a different direction.

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Ed’s Answer

It's really important to decide what you would like to do in the transition. Find a profession that you are passionate about, that way going to work will be a interesting and not just another job. Do research on companies you are interested in ensuring that their culture an visions align with your own. Read annual reports and if possible talk to an employee to get first hand information.

Ed recommends the following next steps:

Review public information like annual reports
Look to see if you can locate an employee or check sites like Glassdoor App
Review posted positions and salary ranges so your expectations are reasonable.
Write resumes that fit each industry you are looking into.
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Adam’s Answer

There are many different assessments to measure in general when considering moving on from one company to another, or changing your profession altogether. In regards to changing company's and staying within the realm of work you've built a foundation of knowledge on it's important to have a career goal in perspective. There are a myriad of reasons why employees leave one company and move onto another in hoping the next opportunity grants betterment. However, a common denominator that triggers ambitious employees to seek other opportunities is stagnation and lack of progression. Whenever growth is stunted, a company doesn't have the means to advance, or if a company's structure lacks career development/cross-departmental movement then red flags are normally triggered. The biggest thing again is having specific goals outlined for where you'd like to see yourself in a career field. Life takes us on it's own path but at least having an agenda, so to speak, with actionable steps to reach an objective helps keep a firm footing on your drive. Money and success are by-products of your tenacity but your passion is most important to remain nourished on the not so great days/seasons.

When changing professions having outlined goals and a game plan is imperative as it's an even bigger leap into the unknown. However, there are always applicable skills learned in a current setting that can be used in a new arena. Many people give up their standard 9-5's to start a business or switch from corporate roles into academia as teachers/professors. There isn't a distinct right path to take in changing professions but it takes more preparation, planning, and confidence in yourself to make the switch effectively as possible. We're all habitual creatures and it is hard to step outside the box but staying invigorated and excited about our career growth takes some gymnastics more often than not.

Here are some tips to assessing when to entertain other opportunities outside of circumstances like family related moves, downsizing/layoffs, etc.
1) Organization structure not aligned with personal career goals
2) Toxic work culture (usually stemming from bad managers/management/hostile environment)
3) Disjointed work flows/expectations that stifle project progress
4) Lack of role progression or advancement to higher ranks after certain tenure/achievements
5) Feeling bored or unchallenged by tasks and responsibilities
6) Lack of emphasis on skill development
7) Lack of transparency, vision, mission, plans with company goals. Feeling like you don't matter.
8) Lack of autonomy and independence
9) Lack of recognition of efforts, achievements, application success, etc.
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Rebecca’s Answer

It really depends on a lot of factors and circumstances. What is the initiatives of changing the careers? Different stages may have different decision. E.g. Imagine a middle age success bankers who earns decent salary now with a family. If he / she would like to change his/her to be a lawyer, it may not be easy. He/She may need to study the law degrees and be a trainee for a few years before he/she can become a qualified solicitor. He/She may not earn as much as a banker at the beginning few years and he/she may have some family burden.
When you are young and before having a family, I would encourage you to find out what you really interested on and the career you would like to pursue. There may be failure or it is not really something you want to do. But, you have the time and does not any financial burden to hinder you from making the change.
Hope this helps! Good Luck!
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Angela M.’s Answer

Before you consider taking a new position, I would consider the following:

1. Talk with your manager and let them know you would like to grow more in your current role, grow more in a new role within the same team or grow more outside of your team but within the same company.
2. There it appears there are not any new growth opportunities, see if you can "re-create" your current job/role by adding some new project or initiative which will showcase your strengths, especially in the areas you are interested in.
3. Make sure to keep an active network (LinkedIn is a good initial space to try) and keep up to date on current job openings, salaries so you get an understanding of what the market is like.
4. Take online classes - there are a lot of free ones - in the area you are interested in.
5. Keep your resume updated at least 2x/year. Interview at least 2x/year.
6. Get a new role before you leave your old role, and
7. Last but not least, it's just as important how you leave your job as how you start one!

Good luck and go get it!!!!
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Sylvia’s Answer

I have found the hardest part in changing any job is that in doing so you sometimes leave your comfort zone, the people you have worked with for possibly a long time and charting new territory. This can be daunting to most people and is why they settle and remain in jobs that do not satisfy them.


I would dig deep and do a cost-benefit analysis of what you love about the job you are in, what you dont like about your job and whether changing a career would satisfy you more.


Money is obviously a factor. But that should not be the deciding factor. As you experience more and more in life you may find that job satifaction and liking/loving what you do is far more important than money. I have taken lower salaries to do pursue jobs that satisfy me more. And that shoukd really be your ultimate goal. Because I know many unhappy people and its mainly from lack of personal satifaction but the pursuit of money.

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Don’s Answer

There are so many reasons to change your job or your career choice: the company you joined didn't have the culture you expected, your workload is not quite what you thought it would be, commute (much bigger concern in markets like LA and SiliconValley). I think the biggest challenge when joining a new job is adapting to the new culture. Every business has their own culture and it's important to understand that AS you are interviewing as well as starting a new position. Culture is so important in a career and if you end up joining a company based on salary and not thinking about culture and your fit in that culture, the money may not be worth it.
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