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Is getting a job in IT a good idea right after college?

Interested in getting a career in the IT field.

Thank you comment icon Hi! Totally agree with Sajal. If you're passionate about IT, go for it! I have a few friends planning to go into IT post-grad, and I know those jobs are offering them a kind of security I won't have as a psych and ES major. Of course, if you don't like IT, you can always change. And starting early, right after college, will give you more time to figure out if IT is what you really want to do. Marlowe

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Andrew’s Answer

If you like and are good at IT, it is one of the fields with most opportunity and income potential right out of college. I and many college classmates graduated with different degrees not related to IT (ex. Engineering, Business, Communications) but went on to work in IT right out of college. Some really liked and were good at it and have made very rewarding careers out of it, while others like myself weren't cut out for it and moved on to other fields that we were a better match for. Even though it didn't work out in my case I'm glad I gave it a try, since I would've never really known. So if you like some type of IT-related work and think you are good or can become good at it, then its definitely worth it. IT is also a very project-based industry and one where work is often virtual, and thus most people who work in the field typically change employers every few years once an IT project ends or they find a better opportunity whether in person locally or remotely in another city/state/country.
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Sajal’s Answer

Why not? If the IT field is where you want to work, you should start as early as possible. Unless you get placed through the college placement system, start anywhere. Because experience matters. Also, I suggest you enter somewhere, gather experience, and then move over to greener pastures. But getting that first break and relevant experience really matters. I need to clarify, that what I said about the experience, is relevant to any field, but more so in the IT field. Since IT is a vast field with multiple disciplines, would suggest trying things out while you are in college. Check open-source projects and contribute if you like coding. Learn about cloud computing if you want to work in that field. Learn machine learning, and AI if you want to work there. Likewise, there is data science or even system administration. There are many options. Start exploring and see what you like most and try to get into that. You can explore them while in college, so when you are out, join a field you like most.

You will never know unless you try. For reference, I did my engineering in "Electronics & Communication" with a specialization in computer systems. Out of college, I worked in a factory as an electronics equipment maintenance department head. Did it for 6months. Didn't like it and moved to join IT field after finishing few short term courses.
Thank you comment icon Alright, thanks a ton! Landon
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James Constantine’s Answer

Hi Landon,

Absolutely, launching your career in Information Technology (IT) straight out of college can be a smart move.

The IT sector is in high demand and continues to expand, presenting a wealth of opportunities for fresh graduates. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) predicts an 11% growth in IT jobs from 2019 to 2029, outpacing the average growth rate for all occupations. This surge is fueled by the escalating reliance on technology and data across diverse industries.

Starting your IT career early gives you a head start in gaining hands-on experience, forging professional connections, and keeping pace with the latest tech trends. Plus, many firms provide training programs and career growth opportunities, allowing you to hone your skills and expertise further.

However, fresh graduates may face a few hurdles when stepping into the IT job market:

Intense competition: The rising demand for IT experts also means more candidates vying for the same positions. This competition could pose a challenge for new graduates seeking their first IT job.

High standards: Employers often anticipate new recruits to have a firm grasp of the latest technologies and best practices. This can be daunting for fresh graduates who may not have had comprehensive exposure to all the necessary tools and techniques during their academic journey.

Transitioning to the workplace: Shifting from a scholastic environment to a professional one can be a tough adjustment for some recent graduates. Juggling multiple projects, meeting deadlines, and teamwork are crucial skills that may take time to fully develop.

To navigate these obstacles and boost your chances of landing an IT job right after college, consider these strategies:

Get hands-on experience: Engage in internships, co-op programs, or volunteer work during your college years to gain practical IT experience. This will not only make you more appealing to potential employers but also help you cultivate vital professional skills.

Stay informed: Regularly update yourself on new technologies, trends, and best practices in the IT industry. Attend workshops, webinars, or online courses. Platforms like Coursera, Udemy, or edX offer a range of IT-related courses that can help you stay ahead and boost your skills.

Expand your network: Link up with IT professionals through networking events, conferences, or online platforms like LinkedIn. Establishing connections with industry insiders can open doors to job opportunities and provide valuable insights into the job market.

Customize your resume and cover letter: Emphasize your relevant skills, experiences, and accomplishments when applying for IT jobs. Ensure your resume and cover letter illustrate how you can contribute to potential employers' goals and objectives.

Prepare for interviews: Get familiar with common interview questions and practice your responses to enhance your confidence and communication skills during interviews. Research the company and its offerings before the interview to demonstrate your genuine interest in joining them.

May God bless you on your journey!
James Constantine.
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Jai’s Answer

Well, it depends.
Do you like IT field ? if so then yes. well i suggest you somethings based on my experience. below are few important things you should be aware of your self before getting into IT.

1. Identify what role that best suits you.
for example if you like to as questions and identify mistakes then Testing suits best to your personality or you are good at communicating with people or managing them the Analyst or Manager.
2. Knowledge on current booming Technlogy /Tools ( like JAVA,C,C++,Python ,D365)
3. start apllying internships when you are in college it self
4. create linkdin account and maintain professional connections
well and so on.

Hope it helps.

Thanks,
Jai.
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Scott’s Answer

In the summers of your junior and senior years, I'd strongly suggest related internships. They provide a bridge between the theory and practical experience. Both my sons recently graduated and it worked out great for them.

If two recent CS-related grads apply, as a responsibility to my company, I would normally place a higher priority on the one that can show related internships, even factoring in GPA, courses taken, etc. Why? Because you'll be exposed to Software Engineering processes in a real-world environment. You'll simultaneously show you're a self-starter, and many other positive attributes, and have IT professionals you worked with support that assertion.

Btw - Taking a few months off after graduation to, say, travel is understandable/acceptable. Any more time and you'll probably have to explain the gap to the interviewer.


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